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Avant garde contemporary Spanish cuisine

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#1 pedro

pedro
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Posted 16 February 2005 - 01:24 PM

Thanks very much for joining us in this eG Forums Q&A.

I'm interested in knowing what's your experience with contemporary Spanish cuisine, particularly in the avant garde field, and what do you think about it: is it likely to be adopted elsewhere, how much do you value creativity among other factors, . . .
PedroEspinosa (aka pedro)

#2 Eric Asimov

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Posted 16 February 2005 - 03:54 PM

Pedro,

I'm fascinated by it. I unfortunately haven't eaten at El Bulli, but I did eat at La Broche in Miami, which I thought was great. I don't think enough people agreed with me, because I think it's out of business. And I believe that I think more highly of WD-50 than a lot of my colleagues. I think it's fun and surprising, and can have the beneficial effect of forcing you to confront your own expectations, when it's done right. Done wrong, and it's a bad joke.

I do think ultimately it's a novelty, a culinary cul de sac, not really an alternative to fresh, seasonal cooking. But I think this sort of experimental cooking, in the right hands, can be both educational and highly entertaining.

#3 The Cynical Chef

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Posted 16 February 2005 - 04:13 PM

I do think ultimately it's a novelty, a culinary cul de sac
[/quote]


Culinary Cul de Sac! Love that line.... would you mind terribly if I borrowed it from time to time?
John Malik
Chef/Owner
33 Liberty Restaurant
Greenville, SC

www.33liberty.com


Customer at the carving station: "Pardon me but is that roast beef rare?"

Apprentice Cook Malik: "No sir! There's plenty more in the kitchen!"

#4 pedro

pedro
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Posted 16 February 2005 - 05:33 PM

. . . I did eat at La Broche in Miami, which I thought was great. I don't think enough people agreed with me, because I think it's out of business.


It is. Hearsay here in Spain is that Arola could be opening an operation in NY one of these days.

And I believe that I think more highly of WD-50 than a lot of my colleagues. I think it's fun and surprising, and can have the beneficial effect of forcing you to confront your own expectations, when it's done right. Done wrong, and it's a bad joke.


I've been twice to WD-50 and I agree with your view. It's definitely fun, sometimes is surprising and Wylie's best dishes are worth the visit. When I was there a month ago, I found that compared with my previous visit back in January 2004, he was able to sustain the momentum achieved in his top dishes, while at the same time reducing the number of not-so-good and failed dishes. Therefore, a much more balanced and satisfactory meal in 2005.

I do think ultimately it's a novelty, a culinary cul de sac, not really an alternative to fresh, seasonal cooking. But I think this sort of experimental cooking, in the right hands, can be both educational and highly entertaining.


I don't think they're totally opposed concepts. I mean, most of the chefs, if not all, who are truly leading this movement in Spain use seasonal and fresh products in their dishes, while appliying cutting edge techniques. Ferrán Adrià himself told us that he rarely cooked with products coming from outside a range of 70 miles around elBulli.
PedroEspinosa (aka pedro)





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