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Paella

Spanish

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126 replies to this topic

#121 EnriqueB

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 12:37 AM

The Ultimate Rice Cooker Cookbook suggest you can cook polenta in a rice cooker

 

it has 4 pages on it.  I have not done this but thanks for that inspiration

 

i have done risotto  ( very good i thought for one button cooking ) and paella   also good.

 

I think it can cook any grain + water  or milk or flavorings of your choice

 

Sorry rotuts, but you cannot call "paella" to something that goes out of a rice cooker. Paella is a specific pan and it is necessary to provide the unique characteristic features of paella rice, i.e. a completelly dry rice in a very thin layer, that cannot be obtained with a rice cooker. It may produce a wonderful rice with similar aromatics but it will never be paella.  :smile:


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#122 rotuts

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 05:59 AM

OK EB correct you are.

 

however, having lived in (E)Spain for several years, the error was mine :

 

( I did use both Bomba and Calaparra rice, different times )

 

it was " Paella-ish."

 

it brought back fond memories.  as I glazed at the Paella Pans still in their Galeria Preciados paper, still tied w their string ...

 

they are mounted on the wall.

 

PS   Mea culpa dos :

 

i cooked it inside !

 

:huh:


Edited by rotuts, 12 June 2014 - 06:40 AM.


#123 paulraphael

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 08:17 AM

I'm no expert on paella, but I'm suspicious of definitions that depend on a particular tool or procedure. For years traditionalists like Marcella Hazan said that risotto was only possible if one followed a very strict set of procedures in an open pan with constant stirring. Now almost everyone who's tried it in a pressure cooker has kept doing so, including some prominent Italian chefs. We've come to our senses and defined risotto by the result, not by what the wizard is doing behind the curtain.



#124 rotuts

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 08:35 AM

paella does need a certain type of rice, as risotto does.

 

ive had paella in Spain, many times.  indeed the 'better' version is cooked outside on a 'camp fire' featuring

 

local scavenged wood.

 

but for a no fuss one button dish :  Fuzzy Rice Cooker 

 

and you use spanish saffron of course.



#125 paulraphael

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 09:01 AM

I'm questioning the tool and procedure, not the ingredient.



#126 EnriqueB

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 12:25 AM

I'm no expert on paella, but I'm suspicious of definitions that depend on a particular tool or procedure. For years traditionalists like Marcella Hazan said that risotto was only possible if one followed a very strict set of procedures in an open pan with constant stirring. Now almost everyone who's tried it in a pressure cooker has kept doing so, including some prominent Italian chefs. We've come to our senses and defined risotto by the result, not by what the wizard is doing behind the curtain.

 

paulraphael, whereas I completelly agree with you in general, and agree in the case of risotto, I cannot agree in this specific case. I'm not a fundamentalist of paella (and there are quite a few around here), but rather I am defining paella in terms of its unique features, and these are: a completelly dry rice using short-grain rice whose grains do not join but feel separated, in a very thin layer in such a way that the bottom layer produces an intense maillard reaction (called "socarrat") and a kind of "oily" and very tasty top layer is formed. The rice must cook uniformly (and that's why a very thin layer is required), and each grain should have a slightly hard cender ("aldente"). Realize many paellas even here in Spain do not fit this definition, but it is what constitutes a real and good quality paella.

 

Getting these unique identifying features seems very hard without a pan that is quite wide and without a very controlled stock evaporation. In fact getting these results requires being extremelly careful with the rice/stock ratio and the heat control, which must be very strong during the first part of the cooking, then reduced, then increased again. Good paellas are one of the hardest recipes I know to get properly done.

 

Traditional paellas were cooked on fire on woods (called "sarmientos") which would also give smoke flavour to the rice. Modern paellas can be cooked on a variety of wide pans with differnt heat control, but other tools such as a pressure cooker or a rice cooker simply do not produce a cooking environment that can produce the characteristic features of paella. I am really open to new techniques and developments, but have not seen at the moment any tool or technique that can reproduce these identifying features.



#127 Kerala

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 09:50 AM

paulraphael, whereas I completelly agree with you in general, and agree in the case of risotto, I cannot agree in this specific case. I'm not a fundamentalist of paella (and there are quite a few around here), but rather I am defining paella in terms of its unique features, and these are: a completelly dry rice using short-grain rice whose grains do not join but feel separated, in a very thin layer in such a way that the bottom layer produces an intense maillard reaction (called "socarrat") and a kind of "oily" and very tasty top layer is formed. The rice must cook uniformly (and that's why a very thin layer is required), and each grain should have a slightly hard cender ("aldente"). Realize many paellas even here in Spain do not fit this definition, but it is what constitutes a real and good quality paella.

 

 

Beautiful description. I'm sure I nailed it once or twice last summer!







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