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"The Bread Baker's Apprentice" by Reinhart

Bread

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491 replies to this topic

#481 Marlene

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 06:44 PM

After attending a week long bread baking course in New York recently, I tried the Vienna bread again, using some of the techniques I learned. Apparently I failed at shaping. :biggrin:

Bar none, this is the best result I've obtained. Great oven spring and bloom and a crumb to die for.

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Marlene
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Practice. Do it over. Get it right.
Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

#482 Kerry Beal

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 07:22 PM

After attending a week long bread baking course in New York recently,  I tried the Vienna bread again, using some of the techniques I learned.  Apparently I failed at shaping. :biggrin:

Bar none, this is the best result I've obtained.  Great oven spring and bloom and a crumb to die for.

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Oh god - that looks gorgeous!!!

#483 Marlene

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Posted 24 April 2008 - 07:26 PM

Thanks Kerry. :smile: We love this bread.
Marlene
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Practice. Do it over. Get it right.
Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

#484 Marlene

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Posted 06 May 2008 - 06:37 PM

Italian Bread from BBA

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Marlene
cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.
Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

#485 CaliPoutine

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Posted 11 April 2009 - 09:28 AM

Bagels, with sesame and sea salt.  I am not a good baker and I have never made bagels before, yet the recipe and directions were easy to follow, and the bagels were delicious.  Thank you, Mr. Reinhart.

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Hey K,

I didnt realize you made these. I have the dough in the fridge and will boil and bake overnight. One one of my previous trip to S. Fl I got my favorite bagel shop to sell me some high gluten flour. I'm very excited as I've wanted to make this recipe for a long time. ( I bought diatastic malt about 2yrs ago, I hope its still good).

#486 franktex

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Posted 14 June 2009 - 08:43 AM

I'm a novice at bread baking, and picked up a copy of The Bread Baker's Apprentice. It has a recipe for Light Wheat bread that calls for Powdered milk. I have also seen one that calls for powdered potatoes. Whay would these ingredients be included in bread?
Frank in Austin

#487 Lisa Shock

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Posted 14 June 2009 - 11:00 AM

I'm a novice at bread baking, and picked up a copy of The Bread Baker's Apprentice. It has a recipe for Light Wheat bread that calls for Powdered milk. I have also seen one that calls for powdered potatoes. Whay would these ingredients be included in bread?

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Potato starch adds a soft gelatinous texture to bread, and helps to prevent staling.

Dry potato flakes are easy to store, measure and use. They also tend to be free of Bacillus Mesentericus, aka 'Rope' an infection of bread which leaves you with loaves with runny centers and a weird cantaloupe smell. Rope spores are not killed by normal cooking temperatures, so they can survive very well in products like home-cooked potatoes.

There are old recipes that call for cooked potatoes, but they are less exact because of moisture content variations. The cooked potatoes may contain the Rope bacilli and ruin your loaves and potentially infect the whole kitchen so that nothing bakes well for you.


Powdered milk is easy to store and measure, and is generally non-fat. (If it has fat the % is regulated.) So, it's a more consistent ingredient. Whey protein can interfere with gluten development, scalding and most processing to powder deactivates the whey. So, powdered milk eliminates the need for scalding, saving the baker time.

Milk adds flavor, improves crumb texture, prevents wild fermentation, adds crust & crumb color (the lactose is not digested by yeast, so it survives into the oven where it browns nicely)

#488 franktex

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 06:30 AM

Thanks for the prompt answers and info. I look forward to checking out this section of eG much more as I gain baking experience. (I got biscuits down though!)
Frank in Austin

#489 Lisa Shock

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Posted 15 June 2009 - 10:21 AM

There are some good resources here, both in the forums and in the eG Culinary Institute section.

Have fun baking!

#490 Chris Hennes

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 04:41 PM

Does anyone know why Reinhart's recipes call for additional yeast to be added when making a poolish- or other pre-ferment-based bread? There is already plenty of yeast in the pre-ferment, as far as I can tell, so I don't understand why you'd bother adding any more. I haven't even noticed a substantial difference in rise times when omitting the second batch of yeast.

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#491 John DePaula

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Posted 07 April 2010 - 10:40 AM

I made the Multigrain Bread Extraordinaire yesterday and it was pretty fantastic. The depth of flavor was intense and made me wonder how we ever got away from baking with whole grains in the first place. Nothing matches the flavor you get from fresh whole grains!
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
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When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#492 Rico

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Posted 13 January 2011 - 04:03 PM

Thread revival. I've made a few things in this book, and they've turned out wonderfully - at least I think: I'd never had Anadama bread, so I do know if it tasted like it's supposed to taste, but it tasted good.

But I learned something today: Read all the directions. When he says 6-10 tablespoons of water, he might actually mean that you might need to use all 10, and not just 6. Wasted the day trying to make ciabatta. Ended up with ciabrick.





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