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Your favorite brand of pasta

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66 replies to this topic

#31 HungryC

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 06:53 AM

I probably eat more of the Barilla Plus (a multigrain version of the usual stuff) than anything else.  I do like the texture--it's a firm bite.



#32 lindag

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 07:24 AM

Have you checked Cooks Illustrated?  They often test the different brands of pasta.



#33 Shelby

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 07:57 AM

For everyday use, I like Barilla.  For special occasions--when I don't make fresh pasta--hands down the best dried pasta I've ever had is Caponi Pontedera.  It's expensive.....but it's good.  



#34 Joe Blowe

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 08:35 AM

Some additional data:  An interesting dried-pasta tasting


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#35 Paul Bacino

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 09:57 AM

Most of the time..regular ole Brialla.. Works for me too. I can pick it up for less than 1 dollar for a 16 oz box..comes in a lot of styles. When you feed 20 plus people on Sundays..regularly..it becomes economic.

Can you still buy Barilla in 1-lb boxes?

Well..Mine are!!

 

454g  = 1#   according to Barilla


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#36 rx6006

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 06:16 PM

Growing up, the only pasta in the house was San Giorgio. In my own house, I stock Barilla. They're both fairly priced, and of good quality. Occasionally, I buy a brand from Whole Foods (the name escapes me) that uses a Jerusalem artichoke flour blend. I find that blend works well when using fettuccine noodles doused in a cream based sauce.


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#37 gfweb

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 07:25 PM

Have you checked Cooks Illustrated?  They often test the different brands of pasta.


IIRC Cooks liked dececco. Both for taste and for price.

#38 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 07:55 PM

DeCecco is the only brand of dried pasta I have used for many years.  I try to avoid cooking with dried pasta, but far too often I am lazy.



#39 heidih

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 07:58 PM

I find it curious that folks comment about dry being inferior to fresh - are they not different animals?
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#40 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 08:51 PM

I'd say egg pasta and water pasta (for lack of a better term) are different animals, as it were.  As I recall MC has a topic about adding zanthan gum to egg pasta to endow it with the bite of a good commercial water pasta.  Normal egg pasta is more tender.  If egg pasta is even slightly over cooked it is not a nice experience.



#41 merstar

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 10:31 PM

Barilla is my favorite - perfect texture.


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#42 nickrey

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 11:37 PM

I use home branded artisan pasta imported by my local Italian providore. Someone above mentioned bronze die extrusion. This leaves little ridges down the pasta to which the sauce will stick. This type of extruded pasta is a level above Barilla (which is good for a mass produced product) and typically a bit more expensive but the difference is noticeable and worth pursuing. 


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#43 Franci

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 05:50 AM

I really dislike Barilla. As everyday pasta I like De Cecco much more. As a nicer brand I like Cocco.



#44 Hassouni

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 08:13 AM

Isn't De Cecco made in bronze dies? I don't eat much pasta but I remember the raw product having a rougher feel (in a good way) than most other brands



#45 rotuts

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 08:41 AM

yep.

 

http://www.dececcous...?Pagina_Mondo=5

 

I also like deCecco.

 

if on sale, when no one is looking, I Bulk Up on Ranzoni 'Smart Taste'    its said to have 'fiber'

 

must be the modified wheat starch.    not always a good idea to study the fine print.


Edited by rotuts, 18 August 2013 - 08:42 AM.


#46 weinoo

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 10:42 AM

I like Setaro brand dried pasta from Naples.  Comes in 1 kilo packages for about $7.

 

Barilla is produced both in Italy and in the U.S. The American product is fortified with niacin, iron, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin and folic acid, whereas the Italian product only lists two ingredients: semolina and durum flours.  For the money, they're both pretty reliable.


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#47 merstar

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 07:39 PM

I really dislike Barilla. As everyday pasta I like De Cecco much more. As a nicer brand I like Cocco.

Interesting. I'm just the opposite - I dislike De Cecco - the texture is too heavy.


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#48 Shel_B

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 03:03 AM

I probably eat more of the Barilla Plus (a multigrain version of the usual stuff) than anything else.  I do like the texture--it's a firm bite.

I've tried that and found it satisfactory. Nice texture and flavor. It's got a bit of earthiness to it that's appropriate in some situations.

.... Shel


#49 Shel_B

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 03:15 AM

With so many recommendations for Barilla, I bought a box a couple of weeks ago, and tonight I tried it in a Cacio e Pepe.  Got home from a short outing and wanted a quick snack.

 

I cooked the pasta precisely according to the directions, and it turned out nicely al dente.  Other than that, it was a disappointment.  Not very flavorful, and although cooked al dente, there was an outer layer to the pasta that was mushy - I'd bite through the mushiness to get to the good stuff.

 

I think I'll stick to the artisanal brands I've tried and liked.  Sure, they're more expensive, but I eat pasta so infrequently, I want to really enjoy every bite.


.... Shel


#50 Michael Speleoto

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 05:32 AM

De Cecco is what's usually available in the shops here in the UK, so I go with that. Or Garofalo if I'm in Costco. But really, I buy anything that's been made using bronze die extrusion. The smooth nylon die stuff that you normally get in supermarkets is just unpleasant as the sauce doesn't seem to adhere to it very well.



#51 phatj

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 05:39 AM

I appear to be in the minority, but I never really noticed any difference between one brand and another. I just bought whatever was cheapest at the supermarket (I pretty much don't eat pasta at all any more, as I avoid processed carbs).



#52 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 01:48 PM

Dreamfields reduced carb pasta
Wawa Sizzli FTW!

#53 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 04:09 PM

It's the air, stupid!

 

As posted above, I prefer De Cecco.  However my market stocks very few shapes of De Cecco -- notably not linguine, which is my favorite shape of dried pasta.  Recently I saw a new brand (at least new for me), Delverde.

 

Since it was on sale I bought a box of Delverde linguine fini to try.  It is not a bad pasta and I plan to buy again.  The texture is a bit slimier than De Cecco.  I don't mean that to be pejorative.

 

The Delverde box says "artisan made, bronze dies, slow dried, spring water".  This is a bit confusing as the Delverde website speaks of water from the Verde river, but never says Verde river water, which river is apparently fed from springs, is what is used to make the pasta.  But the quality is attributed to "the purity of the air":  "Pasta that breathes deep".

 

Note, even though I can buy linguini fini, I still can't find linguini!



#54 Ashen

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 08:49 PM

I am partial to divella.  The red bag is fine by me but bronze die extruded is also available in a green bag.

 

More important than brand is how it is cooked and sauced imo

 

A very interesting article about that here

 

http://www.nytimes.c...nted=all&src=pm

 

I was interested to learn that it is possible to visually spot   pasta that is dried at high heat vs  low heat drying.   The difference is down to Maillard reaction  and imparts its own flavour. 


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#55 ScoopKW

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 01:52 AM

I generally use Cav. Giuseppe Cocco pasta when I use store-bought. I like the texture and flavor. I buy it at a local market, where they always seem to have a few boxes in their discount section, marked down from "you've-got-to-be-kidding-me" to "cheaper-than-a-plane-ticket."


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#56 Jon Savage

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 02:47 PM

I'm quite partial to the Trader Joe's stuff, regular, whole wheat (the only whole wheat pasta I've actually liked), and of course their organic pasta is excellent as well. Some shapes do (or at least did) use bronze die extrusion as well.


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#57 GlowingGhoul

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 08:23 AM

I used Barilla for years, primarily because I used their sauces (which have much less sugar than other mainstream brands, giving them a more complex flavor), until an Italian friend of mine said Barilla pasta doesn't develop a proper al dente texture. It's either undercooked or slightly mushy.

 

I started trying other imported brands, and to my surprise the texture was much, much better. I currently use DaVinci. It's priced the same as Barilla.



#58 Franci

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 08:10 PM

I like Setaro brand dried pasta from Naples.  Comes in 1 kilo packages for about $7.
 
Barilla is produced both in Italy and in the U.S. The American product is fortified with niacin, iron, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin and folic acid, whereas the Italian product only lists two ingredients: semolina and durum flours.  For the money, they're both pretty reliable.


Now, I'm noticing this more and more, also De Cecco and Garofalo are fortified! Does it mean I need to resort to the artisanal brands for my every day pasta?

#59 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 08:24 PM

I also notice De Cecco is fortified.  But is this a bad thing?  Can you taste the difference?



#60 jmolinari

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 01:58 PM

the fortification isn't the problem. It's the use of durum flour instead of only semolina, which makes barilla pasta made in america SUCK.

I use De Cecco and Di Martino Bronzo.


Edited by jmolinari, 11 October 2013 - 01:59 PM.






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