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#61 andiesenji

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 08:14 PM

I have to confess that I often use couscous in a totally non-traditional way, paired with foods from other cultures.
One of my favorite Asian dishes is orange chicken, very spicy. I think it tastes better with couscous than it does with rice.
I have also paired it with Mexican foods, Indonesian foods and regional American foods.
I think it is far too versatile to limit its use to the traditional middle eastern table.

A couple of weeks ago I made a version of Ayam Panggang Klaten, from Java, chicken in a coconut milk/nut sauce that is fairly spicy. It is cooked until almost all the liquid has been reduced and the sauce is very thick and creamy.
It is very good with steamed rice, but with couscous it is sublime.

I should add that I began doing "fusion" cooking long before anyone ever mentioned the term.

Edited by andiesenji, 15 January 2005 - 08:15 PM.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#62 chefzadi

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 08:21 PM

I've heard of Clifford Wright before coming to this forum. But I've not read his writings. Anyway, after seeing him mentioned a few times in this thread, I did some googling and found his website. I did a keyword search on Algerian cuisine. He confirms things that I've said in this thread. But he also mentions a few things that I would not consider "typical" of Algerian cookery. In the second paragraph of the link I will provide below he states that Algerians mix in melted butter and cinnamon into semolina couscous. The statement is made within the context of distinguishing Algerian style couscous from Tunisian style couscous. I've only seen cinnamon added to semolina couscous for a limited number of sweet dishes in Algeria. The addition of cinnamon to the semolina couscous for savory meals would be a regional and very limited addition. Algerian semolina couscous is not characterized by or distinguished by the addition of cinnamon.


http://www.clifforda...es/kaskasu.html

Btw, he also talks about Israeli couscous in the first paragraph.
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#63 chefzadi

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 08:38 PM

I have to confess that I often use couscous in a totally non-traditional way, paired with foods from other cultures. 
One of my favorite Asian dishes is orange chicken, very spicy.  I think it tastes better with couscous than it does with rice.
I have also paired it with Mexican foods, Indonesian foods and regional American foods.
I think it is far too versatile to limit its use to the traditional middle eastern table.

A couple of weeks ago I made a version of Ayam Panggang Klaten, from Java, chicken in a coconut milk/nut sauce that is fairly spicy.  It is cooked until almost all the liquid has been reduced and the sauce is very thick and creamy.
It is very good with steamed rice, but with couscous it is sublime.

I should add that I began doing "fusion" cooking long before anyone ever mentioned the term.

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In the culinary universe I would put couscous next to rice in terms of versatility. We all have our own culturally and intellectually defined cut off points for "authenticity". As for myself couscous served with dishes outside of the realm of North African cookery is heresy. But the first time I tried kimchi pancakes I told my mother in law that they would taste better with cheese. My wife's family gasped and looked at me like I was sick.
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#64 Wolfert

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 11:48 AM

North African cooking is blessed with so many recipes for couscous and for serving it.

I love the traditional couscous recipes best---couscous with favas and buttermilk; couscous with seven vegetables; couscous cooked with wild greens and peppers; couscous with Lamb Confit and Greens; barley couscous with lamb and Chard; barley couscous with favas and buttermilk; and couscous with pomegranates, orange and cinnamon.

What I like is that they employ ingredients that have traditionally complemented one another and that , when combined, create a flavor different and more pleasing then when served on their own. Until I've tasted all the great couscous dishes of the world, I plan to keep away from dipping into fusion couscous.

I am intrigued by sophisticated kitchen techniques and if a way can be found to make steaming easier (it isn't hard but people do groan) I'm game to try it.

I also wear the hat of a French South West cook and I am very enthusiastic about preparing duck confit with the technique of sous vide. Something I've been learning about on another thread.

Edited by Wolfert, 16 January 2005 - 11:50 AM.

“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

#65 andiesenji

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 02:42 PM

I do love the traditional couscous pairings. However I am so fond of couscous that there were times when I wanted some for a meal but did not have the necessary ingredients for preparing a traditional meal. So, rather than forego having the couscous, I simply prepared it and had it with something else.
I didn't deliberately try to bastardize the food, I simply made a substitution that I found to be most enjoyable.
I was born and raised in a portion of the south where sometimes you hear someone say "we never serve that with that" - however in my grandfather's home, we had a large extended family, half from England, half from the American South, his cook was a Gullah woman from the Carolina lowcountry and he had spent time in India and Egypt in the early part of the last century and had come to enjoy those foods also. The selection of foods was extensive and often unusual. Neighboring farmers considered us "furriners" and rather odd and I don't think any of them were ever very comfortable when visiting.
I learned to make mustard, the way my granddad liked it, when I was about 10 and still make it that way.
His cook learned to cook curries and other foods he discovered on his travels.
I don't recall having couscous as a child, it may not have been available commercially in that area at that time (1940s). However we did have a lot of rice and pasta, including orzo and a homemade pasta which was forced through a potato ricer and cooked while very fresh.
Growing up in such a household resulted in my being rather adventuresome when it came to food.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#66 chefzadi

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 02:54 PM

I do love the traditional couscous pairings.  However I am so fond of couscous that there were times when I wanted some for a meal but did not have the necessary ingredients for preparing a traditional meal.  So, rather than forego having the couscous, I simply prepared it and had it with something else. 
I didn't deliberately try to bastardize the food, I simply made a substitution that I found to be most enjoyable. 
I was born and raised in a portion of the south where sometimes you hear someone say "we never serve that with that" - however in my grandfather's home, we had a large extended family, half from England, half from the American South, his cook was a Gullah woman from the Carolina lowcountry and he had spent time in India and Egypt in the early part of the last century and had come to enjoy those foods also.  The selection of foods was extensive and often unusual.  Neighboring farmers considered us "furriners" and rather odd and I don't think any of them were ever very comfortable when visiting. 
I learned to make mustard, the way my granddad liked it, when I was about 10 and still make it that way.
His cook learned to cook curries and other foods he discovered on his travels. 
I don't recall having couscous as a child, it may not have been available commercially in that area at that time (1940s).  However we did have a lot of rice and pasta, including orzo and a homemade pasta which was forced through a potato ricer and cooked while very fresh. 
Growing up in such a household resulted in my being rather adventuresome when it came to food.

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Of course Andie. That's why I mentioned the part about Korean Kimchi cakes and cheese. I still think it's a brilliant idea! And in defense of my case I have to mention that I've seen kimchi pizza in Seoul and Los Angeles.

As for your earlier comment that you were doing fusion long before it was called fusion. Couscous as we know it today wouldn't exist without the Berbers, the Arabs, spices from India, tomatoes and peppers from the new world,etc. It's culinary evolution.

In my household we eat Algerian, Korean and French food. Who knows what great fusion dishes my kids will come up with they grow up? We already have a few favorites. Boeuf aux carottes cooked with just a little bit of soy sauce and garlic (a cross with Korean braised shor ribs) and it's delicious. We make Scallop spring rolls with spicy aioli. In France Algerians finish a meal of couscous french cheeses and pastries....

Please keep being adventuresome... The most important thing about food is that you enjoy yourself.
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#67 Wolfert

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 02:54 PM

As a food writer, I have always loved dishes about which a story can be told, a story, perhaps, about why and by whom a particular dish is cooked, or relating something about the place where it is served. It puts the dish in context and makes it come alive. It is a bridge I create with my readers.

On the other hand, II totally understand where you are coming from. And, it does seem appropriate as new products such as couscous become available, to delve into them, explore their possibilties, and enjoy them as you wish.
“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

#68 andiesenji

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 02:58 PM

I am intrigued by sophisticated kitchen techniques and if a way can be found to make steaming easier (it isn't hard but people do groan) I'm game to try it.

I also wear the hat of a French South West cook and I am very enthusiastic about preparing duck confit  with the technique of sous vide. Something I've been learning about on another thread.

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I love kitchen gadgets and appliances and am always happy to try something new. I have or have had just about every kind of electric rice cooker on the market. I have the aforementioned copper couscousier and a stainless steel one with a magnetic bottom that works on my induction range. I also have a charcoal-fired cooker/steamer that is vaguely like a Mongolian hot pot only has more parts and is larger. It can only be used outdoors and is somewhere in my storage building. I have used it to cook rice at picnics and other outdoor food events.

I have made duck confit in the traditional method and had planned on using the legs from a Rouen duck this past week to try the sous vide method which I too have been following. However I ended up simply roasting the duck and rendering the fat, which was considerable, compared to other ducks. I had part of one breast and it was very good, darker meat than other ducks. My housekeeper took the rest of it to school to share with her classmates and apparently they were enthusiastic about it. (She is in design school half-days.)
Even though I no longer have family at home, I still love to cook and love to try new things.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#69 hazardnc

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 03:25 PM

I was born and raised in a portion of the south where sometimes you hear someone say "we never serve that with that" - however in my grandfather's home, we had a large extended family, half from England, half from the American South, his cook was a Gullah woman from the Carolina lowcountry and he had spent time in India and Egypt in the early part of the last century and had come to enjoy those foods also.Neighboring farmers considered us "furriners" and rather odd and I don't think any of them were ever very comfortable when visiting.


My mother-in-law was born in Palestine in 1940 to a Palestinian father and an American South (South Carolina) mother. Her family relocated to the States in 1948, moving to Lynchburg, VA. My mother-in-law's family often mixed her father's Middle Eastern dishes with Southern classics. To this day, Christmas dinner will most likely include kousa mahshi, fried eggplant and lahm bi ajeen alongside candied sweet potatoes and country ham!

My husband's friends certainly thought his family was strange. No one in Grand Forks, ND had ever seen tabouli and they would never cook with yoghurt.

As a food writer, I have always loved dishes about which a story can be told, a story, perhaps, about why and by whom a particular dish is cooked, or relating something about the place where it is served. It puts the dish in context and makes it come alive. It is a bridge I create with my readers.


Ms. Wolfert, do you have the book A Taste of Palestine: Menus and Memories by Aziz Shihab? The author gives many wonderfully rich stories alongside his recipes.

#70 Wolfert

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 04:20 PM

Yes, I do have the book and I treasure it. One of my favorite stories is the'walk to Bethlehem"
“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

#71 chefzadi

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 06:29 PM

Sous vide is my preferred method for cooking duck confit. I did alot of sous vide preparations when I was working in France. I was thinking of volunteering to do the Sous vide tutorial here on egullet. But I don't have the time. It can be rather time consuming to translate the methods and equipment from French to English.

But the topic does remind me of vacuum packed "instant" couscous I saw in France. I never used it for obvious reasons. But I'm finding that there is some resistance to steaming couscous 2-3 times from some of my students. They readily admit that it's vastly superior to the packaged directions on the boxes but some of them don't have the time or don't want to spend the time.

Has anyone tried the boil in bag type of couscous? If so, how does it compare to the packaged variety prepared according to the directions on the box? Is it available in America?
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#72 Wolfert

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 07:34 AM

Tunisia has a huge repertoire of couscous recipes. This attractive and spicy onee is most unusua and delicious. It is also easy to prepare.

You make a rich and robust sauce, mix it with the couscous, and steam it altogether. The easy part is you don't need to turn it out mid cooking. You just steam the couscous until it is perfectly cooked.

http://paulawolfert....s/tun_cous.html

Edited by Wolfert, 17 January 2005 - 07:45 AM.

“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

#73 andiesenji

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 10:49 AM

As an interesting side note, I just got the February issue of Sunset magazine and on page 78 is a recipe "Tagine in no time" subtitled "A rich Moroccan stew –in half an hour."
By Emma Smith, it is a recipe for Moroccan lamb chops to be served over couscous or have a baguette on hand. Also includes mention of harissa.
I thought it was interesting that just when we were having this discussion, a recipe would be printed in this magazine.
O.T. In addition there is an article with lovely photos, of a garden at the Benziger Sonoma vineyard, Glen Ellen, not far from you.

Edited by andiesenji, 17 January 2005 - 10:50 AM.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#74 Wolfert

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 12:10 PM

Emma is the enemy.

Edited by Wolfert, 17 January 2005 - 05:56 PM.

“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

#75 andiesenji

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 12:33 PM

It certainly seems a bit simplistic. How can the subtle flavors develop in such a short amount of time?
It takes me much longer just to prepare the ingredients for this type of dish. The cooking takes much longer.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#76 boaziko

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Posted 17 January 2005 - 01:50 PM

[quote name='chefzadi' date='Jan 17 2005, 04:29 AM']
Sous vide is my preferred method for cooking duck confit. I did alot of sous vide preparations when I was working in France. I was thinking of volunteering to do the Sous vide tutorial here on egullet. But I don't have the time. It can be rather time consuming to translate the methods and equipment from French to English.

But the topic does remind me of vacuum packed "instant" couscous I saw in France. I never used it for obvious reasons. But I'm finding that there is some resistance to steaming couscous 2-3 times from some of my students. They readily admit that it's vastly superior to the packaged directions on the boxes but some of them don't have the time or don't want to spend the time.

Has anyone tried the boil in bag type of couscous? If so, how does it compare to the packaged variety prepared according to the directions on the box? Is it available in America?

View Post


/quote]

Hi chefzadi,

I don't have the data about the US version, but i guess the Israeli one is similar.
Here is a link to a 5 min' COUSCOUS, one of few popular brands in Israel.

http://www.couscousm...cgi/couscous.pl

Sure it is far from anything you can easily get in many North African restaurants, and it can not match the fond memory I have of the first CC I got from the lady that used to work at parent's house 30 years ago. She was from Tripoli, Libya, and made heavenly fluffy CC. she would also make Bourik (Thin Dow "leaves" filled with potato puree, egg and Harissa, which at the time I avoided.)

She would also make us Stuffed cabbage, something I loved so much, that even though I was in my early teens I stayed in the kitchen and watched carefully, so I can make quite a good version of it till this day.
The days that she cooked for us, or let us have her home made CC ,were the days with the best meals of our childhood.

The above speedy CC is only used as a last resort, when I can't get hold of a much better, hand made CC.

Boaziko
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#77 hazardnc

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 01:00 PM

I found this blurb that explains what I have in my pantry:

"WHAT? Pearls of marketing wisdom. Following in the tradition of pasta shaped and/or marketed like grains (think Italian orzo and rice), Israeli couscous is technically not related to the staple carbohydrate of the Mahgreb called couscous. Invented in the 1950s by the Tel Aviv-based firm Osem, Israeli couscous is extruded (like ordinary pasta) and toasted to dry (like Jewish farfel). The result, when cooked, is a chewy, buttery carbohydrate that is shaped more like pearls of tapioca than actual couscous, and that has, over the years, become a staple in Israel. To make matters more confusing, traditional African couscous is often mistakenly referred to as a grain. In fact, it is a method of treating durum semolina (the same wheat used to make pasta), that produces small granules, which are then steamed several times and fluffed.

WHEN? May 19, 2000: Michelle Bernstein, The Strand"

If I want to make the moghrabbiyeh, I am going to have to do some more shopping!

#78 chefzadi

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 01:13 PM

I found this blurb that explains what I have in my pantry:

"WHAT? Pearls of marketing wisdom. Following in the tradition of pasta shaped and/or marketed like grains (think Italian orzo and rice), Israeli couscous is technically not related to the staple carbohydrate of the Mahgreb called couscous. Invented in the 1950s by the Tel Aviv-based firm Osem, Israeli couscous is extruded (like ordinary pasta) and toasted to dry (like Jewish farfel). The result, when cooked, is a chewy, buttery carbohydrate that is shaped more like pearls of tapioca than actual couscous, and that has, over the years, become a staple in Israel. To make matters more confusing, traditional African couscous is often mistakenly referred to as a grain. In fact, it is a method of treating durum semolina (the same wheat used to make pasta), that produces small granules, which are then steamed several times and fluffed.

WHEN? May 19, 2000: Michelle Bernstein, The Strand"

If I want to make the moghrabbiyeh,  I am going to have to do some more shopping!

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Quote from Cliffordwright on Algerian couscous and Israeli couscous.

"Algerians also have different names for different couscous dishes such as bufawar or burkukis, a little semolina ball that’s actually a large couscous and which is identical to muhammas, maghribiyya, and the so-called Israeli couscous (which is not Israeli, but a marketing name made up by an Israeli firm)."

Note maghribiyaya.
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#79 hazardnc

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 01:45 PM

Thank you, Chefzadi.

The method in the recipe I am using calls for first soaking and then steaming the maghribiyya.

My package of Israeli couscous must be the instant variety, as it says one only need to pour boiling water over it and then let it rest for 10-15 minutes.

I am going to go ahead and brave the dish with Osem brand and see how things turn out. If I like it this way, I am going to check out our halal market here and see if they carry another variety.

#80 chefzadi

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 01:53 PM

Thank you, Chefzadi.

The method in the recipe I am using calls for first soaking and then steaming the maghribiyya. 

My package of Israeli couscous must be the instant variety, as it says one only need to pour boiling water over it and then let it rest for 10-15 minutes.

I am going to go ahead and brave the dish with Osem brand and see how things turn out.  If I like it this way, I am going to check out our halal market here and see if they carry another variety.

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Let me know if you find another variety at the Halal market. I have not been able to find
maghribiyya in Los Angeles. Also, I've not tried Israeli cousous, but you are probably aware I recommend steaming the finer versions of so called "instant" couscous. So why not prepare a small portion of your instant Israeli couscous according to the package directions and if the result is too dry, try steaming them.
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#81 hazardnc

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 01:58 PM

So why not prepare a small portion of your instant Israeli couscous according to the package directions and if the result is too dry, try steaming them.


Good idea - I will try that.

Before I make an ass of myself at the halal, could someone help me with the pronunciation?

#82 zeitoun

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 02:08 PM

I am going to go ahead and brave the dish with Osem brand and see how things turn out. 

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And please, don't forget to snap some pictures :biggrin:!!!!
"A chicken is just an egg's way of making another egg." Samuel Butler

#83 chefzadi

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 02:08 PM

So why not prepare a small portion of your instant Israeli couscous according to the package directions and if the result is too dry, try steaming them.


Good idea - I will try that.

Before I make an ass of myself at the halal, could someone help me with the pronunciation?

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You saw the long list of different names for the maghribiyaya? Even the spelling variations? Also at the Halal market they might not even speak much Arabic.

Anyway, maghribyaya is actually pretty easy. You can pronounce all the vowels "short".
But in different Arabic dialects this varies as well.
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#84 FoodMan

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 03:24 PM

I'm with chefzadi, pronounciation could vary a lot. I would recommend trying "mog-ra-biya".

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#85 hazardnc

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 03:38 PM

I tried "moh-grahb-ee-ya" and it worked fine :biggrin: . The halal market does not carry it, but a small Lebanese grocer here does - picking it up tomorrow (if it is different from what I have on hand)

I found some online as well Kalyustans

#86 FoodMan

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Posted 18 January 2005 - 03:44 PM

Topic has been moved here from the "Middle East and Africa Forum"

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#87 hazardnc

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 09:47 AM

[
I made Chicken with Moghrabbiyah last night. The recipe comes from Hanou's "Middle Eastern Street Food." I was interested in trying the dish as I had a package of Israeli couscous in the pantry and I had been looking for a dish that included the couscous and chickpeas.

After reading the information on this thread, I began to question whether the couscous in my pantry could be substituted for the mograhbia in the recipe. (please note - this ingredient is spelled many differrent ways and I am sticking with the shorter spelling!) The Israeli couscous is an instant cook couscous. The method in the recipe called for first soaking and then steaming the moghrabia.

Wanting to be as authentic as possible, I decided to visit a local Lebanese grocer. There, I found a package of moghrabia - the pearls of couscous notably larger than what I had at home. I decided to use the Lebanese moghrabia for my first attempt.

Here is a photo of the two brands and a photo showing the size of the pearls:
Posted Image
The different brands

Posted Image
Note the different size of pearls. The Israeli couscous is a "toasted pasta specialty"

The dish is not complicated, though one does go through a number of pots and pans. In addition to soaking the chickpeas overnight, you must cook the chicken in a large casserole, soak the moghrabia and then steam the moghrabia, turn the moghrabia out into a large skillet and saute it along with te cooked chickpeas and onions and the top this mixture with the cooked chicken. Here are some photos:

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The spices are cinnamon (obviously!), 7-spice blend (available at mid-east markets), caraway and gound pepper. The soaked chickpeas are in the back

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The moghrabia post steaming

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The finished dish


I loved the spice combination as it reminds me of a similar dish we make that includes rice with meat, pine nuts and almonds. This is topped with poached chicken sprinkled with cinnamon.

The couscous had a unique texture - I probably should have steamed it a bit longer. It had a very chewy bite to it that contrasted nicely with the chickpeas. My husband did as the Lebanese do and wrapped his up in khubz (bread). He is a starch hound.

If I make this dish again, I will try the Israeli couscous just so that I can compare the texture.

#88 zeitoun

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 10:13 AM

This is wonderful! Thanks for the pictures and the comments.

My experience with moghrabiyyah is that the grain certainly should retain some bite but not too much, so maybe it should have been steemed a little more as you noted. I wonder though, during the sauteeing process, was there any liquid involved (may be some of the liquid you used to poach the chicken with)? The moghrabiyyah(s) I've had always had some kind of starchy, brothy liquid base in it. It should not be soupy though, something close to the texture you'll find in a very creamy/starchy risotto maybe?
"A chicken is just an egg's way of making another egg." Samuel Butler

#89 hazardnc

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 10:19 AM

This is wonderful! Thanks for the pictures and the comments.

My experience with moghrabiyyah is that the grain certainly should retain some bite but not too much, so maybe it should have been steemed a little more as you noted.  I wonder though, during the sauteeing process, was there any liquid involved (may be some of the liquid you used to poach the chicken with)? The moghrabiyyah(s) I've had always had some kind of starchy, brothy liquid base in it.  It should not be soupy though, something close to the texture you'll find in a very creamy/starchy risotto maybe?

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Yes, once you turn the moghrabiya into the skillet, you add 1 1/2 cups of the broth (or more) and saute for a few minutes.

My dish was very starchy. I wonder if I should have rinsed the moghrabiya after soaking but before steaming to remove some of the starch?

Hanou says to add broth as desired, depending on how soupy/stewy you prefer yours.

#90 FoodMan

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 10:40 AM

This looks great hazardnc, I do agree that it should have a little more liquid in it at the end like zeitoun mentioned, but definitly not soupy. It does look awsome though and I cannot wait to add my pictures to this thread once I make mine. I love the way you compare the two "grains" in the picture, this gives everyone a better idea of what to look for.

Your husband has the right idea in eating it with khobz (pita bread). In Tripoli, Lebanon, you would find street vendors selling this dish. The way they serve it is usaully inside a split pita loaf and they add pickled turnips and pickled cucumbers to it. Starch rules!!

Elie

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