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Drinks! (2011–2012)


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#541 bostonapothecary

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 12:58 PM

1 oz. sour orange juice
1 oz. green chartreuse
1 oz. d' oliveira's 10 year madeira demi doux
1 oz. hispaniola mamajuana

another drink in the collage series.

the madeira and sour orange juice combine to create a stunning overtone. all the sugar contents average out quite well against the acidity of the sour orange juice.
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#542 tanstaafl2

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 08:30 AM

The Blonde Wood (I know, it sounds like a joke is to follow...)

1.5 Rye (Used Bulleit)
1.0 Dupont Pommeau de Normandie
0.5 Lillet "Blonde" (Blanc)

Apparently Lillet is describe either way depending on where you are located. Here the bottles say Blanc but "The Blanc Wood" doesn't have quite the same ring I suppose.

I think this is the correct formula. Will have to check when I get home this evening.

Perhaps a bit sweet with a touch of bitterness on the back end from the Lillet. But interesting and worth trying again. Cocchi Americano might also be worth a try.

Have had a small glass of the Prunier Pineau des Charentes most evenings for the last few days as well. My, my is that addictive...

Only brand I have tried and only one available locally that I have seen so far. Are there others people recommend that I should try to push for? Several noted at K&L and Beltramos and Astor has Jean-Luc Pasquet but I know nothing about them.
If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...
~tanstaafl2

#543 bostonapothecary

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 09:04 AM

The Blonde Wood (I know, it sounds like a joke is to follow...)

1.5 Rye (Used Bulleit)
1.0 Dupont Pommeau de Normandie
0.5 Lillet "Blonde" (Blanc)

Apparently Lillet is describe either way depending on where you are located. Here the bottles say Blanc but "The Blanc Wood" doesn't have quite the same ring I suppose.

I think this is the correct formula. Will have to check when I get home this evening.

Perhaps a bit sweet with a touch of bitterness on the back end from the Lillet. But interesting and worth trying again. Cocchi Americano might also be worth a try.

Have had a small glass of the Prunier Pineau des Charentes most evenings for the last few days as well. My, my is that addictive...

Only brand I have tried and only one available locally that I have seen so far. Are there others people recommend that I should try to push for? Several noted at K&L and Beltramos and Astor has Jean-Luc Pasquet but I know nothing about them.


these product categories are a lot of shooting in the dark. but they are very rewarding. i used to see the ferrand pineau des charentes around here but have never bought it.

one thing about the category is that they can become too old and start to get frail and card board-y like many too old white wines. the floc de gascomes age really fast and some have a tiny hidden born on date. the last time i bought one it was too old and went down the drain. the aroma of bottlings that are not too old basically get summed up as either ordinary or extraordinary.

i should point out that too old is not that common, so don't get paranoid when you select one. i'd just recommend avoiding floc de gascomes unless they let you return it if you think it is too old.

randall grahm from bonny doon makes a california pommeau that is worth looking out for. aesthetically detached it was not as extraordinary as others i've had from normandie, but it is fun to explore what randall is coming up with. he was making peach brandy before anyone was even looking for it...

the greatest book ever written on spirits is brandies and liqueurs of the world. i think i remember them covering this category well.

Edited by bostonapothecary, 12 January 2012 - 09:16 AM.

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#544 tanstaafl2

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 09:33 AM

these product categories are a lot of shooting in the dark. but they are very rewarding. i used to see the ferrand pineau des charentes around here but have never bought it.

one thing about the category is that they can become too old and start to get frail and card board-y like many too old white wines. the floc de gascomes age really fast and some have a tiny hidden born on date. the last time i bought one it was too old and went down the drain. the aroma of bottlings that are not too old basically get summed up as either ordinary or extraordinary.

i should point out that too old is not that common, so don't get paranoid when you select one. i'd just recommend avoiding floc de gascomes unless they let you return it if you think it is too old.

randall grahm from bonny doon makes a california pommeau that is worth looking out for. aesthetically detached it was not as extraordinary as others i've had from normandie, but it is fun to explore what randall is coming up with. he was making peach brandy before anyone was even looking for it...

the greatest book ever written on spirits is brandies and liqueurs of the world. i think i remember them covering this category well.


Brillet is one name that has shown up here in a few searches. Would certainly try the Ferrand pineau if I can find it and it is not super expensive.

Belle de Brillet also sounds like it might be interesting.

Haven't seen any Floc but haven't looked closely. My favorite store does have a couple of Armagnacs so I suppose it is possible. Given the concern about its frailty I might pass though.

The Dupont pommeau is the first and only brand of pommeau I have seen as well. I guess while I don't have a lot of choices within these more obscure categories at least I have an option or two now and again and that is a start.
If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...
~tanstaafl2

#545 bostonapothecary

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 10:10 AM

Belle de Brillet also sounds like it might be interesting.


belle de brillet is just a common pear liqueur dressed up with marketing. so many reputable bars put it on their menus under the cognac and eau de vie section. a strange phenomenon because it is definitely the odd man out with all that sugar.

the ferrand guys make an awesome version sold under their matilde label. these are built under the same concept as a pommeau or pineau des charentes which is a distillate diluted by the origional fruit juice source, but they differ because there sugar contents are not in the same range. pineau des charentes should have well under 200 g/l of sugar but the pear versions are over 300g/l and are meant to constrast an equal volume of lemon or lime juice.

the ferrand guys are really proud of the matilde product and have told me it is basically non profit because it is so expensive and difficult to make. pear eau de vies aren't cheap...

in cape verde they make a product using a similar pattern called "punch" where their rum is cut and sweetened with fresh cane juice. i have one bottling from vale d'paul but have never really gotten into it. the aroma seems very ordinary to me.
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#546 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 10:19 AM

The Blonde Wood (I know, it sounds like a joke is to follow...)




Perhaps you might prefer to take the whole thing French: Le Bois Blanc (or Blonde).

That's close anyways, someone will surely make it more correct.

 

 

 

[Moderator note: This topic continues in Drinks! (2012, part 2)]


Edited by Mjx, 08 April 2013 - 01:23 AM.

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