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How To Make Transfer Sheets

Confections

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68 replies to this topic

#61 sote23

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Posted 27 May 2006 - 02:44 PM

I've just returned from the Philadelphia Candy Show with exciting new techniques to share.  If you haven't heard of www.designerstencils, check them out.  Their stencils are fabulous!  They are also designing large stencil sheets for making transfer sheets and will also be selling acetate sheets soon.

While there, I demonstrated air brushing stencil designs on chocolate and acetate.  You can also use tempered chocolate smoothed across the top of the stencil with an off set spatula to create designs.  But what's really exciting is using a stenciling brush to apply warm colored cocoa butter to acetate sheets or directly onto chocolate.  Imagine what you can do on the lip of a dessert plate!

Now that I've used some of Chef Rubber's fabulous pre-colored cocoa butters, I'll never bother mixing my own (with powdered food coloring).  He sells over 100 colors that are ready to use.  All you do is warm the plastic bottle gently in the microwave to no more than 86 degrees and it's ready to use for stenciling, air brushing, and lots of other things.  His website, www.chefrubber.com, is a gold mine for chocolate artisans.

After working (and playing) with chocolate for over 30 years, it's great to discover new magic tricks to add ti my repertoire.

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how does one air brush stencils on to chocolate? i would love to hear more about it, as well as the large stencils for transfer sheets.

#62 schneich

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Posted 29 October 2006 - 12:21 PM

i tried the method today, filled an empty stamp pad with a white colored (titan dioxide) cocoa butter and stamped onto acetate. results on the acetate were quite good, but when i poured the temperedd chocolate the "stamping" would stick to the acetate, and not to the chocolate. on little sheet i put right in the freezer, and the transfer worked fine, the other one where it didnt work i left at room temp.... any suggestions ???

maybe its the acetate... ???

chocolate too cold ??



cheers


t.
toertchen toertchen
patissier chocolatier cafe
cologne, germany

#63 John DePaula

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Posted 29 October 2006 - 03:42 PM

i tried the method today, filled an empty stamp pad with a white colored (titan dioxide) cocoa butter and stamped onto acetate. results on the acetate were quite good, but when i poured the temperedd chocolate the "stamping" would stick to the acetate, and not to the chocolate. on little sheet i put right in the freezer, and the transfer worked fine, the other one where it didnt work i left at room temp....  any suggestions ???

maybe its the acetate...  ???

chocolate too cold ??



cheers


t.

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Correct... chocolate was too cold. Slightly warmer should fix the problem, as long as you're still in temper.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#64 chocartist

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Posted 30 October 2006 - 07:17 AM

Regarding air brushing stencils onto acetate sheets: Lay the stencil on the acetate, holding it in place with your finger. I use Chef Rubber's colored cocoa butter melted no higher than 88 degrees. Fill the cup and spray. For best results hold the gun slightly angled to the surface as you spray (without allowing any of the cocoa butter to flow out). If you hold the gun at a sharp angle, the air pressure sometimes lifts the stencil and causes the design to smear. Give the sprayed design plenty of time to dry completely. I put the sheet in the refrigerator for about 5 minutes, take it out and allow it to come to room temperature. If the cocoa butter is still tacky at this point, it means that you probably overheated the cocoa butter and broke its temper.

My best advice when air brushing with cocoa butter is to warm the tip of the gun with a hair dryer before spraying; it helps to keep the tip of the gun from clogging. I also find that the best way to clean the brush is with Dawn dishwashing detergent and hot water.

#65 Kerry Beal

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Posted 30 October 2006 - 02:13 PM

Regarding air brushing stencils onto acetate sheets:  Lay the stencil on the acetate, holding it in place with your finger.  I use Chef Rubber's colored cocoa butter melted no higher than 88 degrees.  Fill the cup and spray.  For best results hold the gun slightly angled to the surface as you spray (without allowing any of the cocoa butter to flow out).  If you hold the gun at a sharp angle, the air pressure sometimes lifts the stencil and causes the design to smear.  Give the sprayed design plenty of time to dry completely.  I put the sheet in the refrigerator for about 5 minutes, take it out and allow it to come to room temperature.  If the cocoa butter is still tacky at this point, it means that you probably overheated the cocoa butter and broke its temper.

My best advice when air brushing with cocoa butter is to warm the tip of the gun with a hair dryer before spraying; it helps to keep the tip of the gun from clogging.  I also find that the best way to clean the brush is with Dawn dishwashing detergent and hot water.

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Elaine,
What sort of airbrush are you using?

#66 schneich

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Posted 30 October 2006 - 04:00 PM

Correct... chocolate was too cold.  Slightly warmer should fix the problem, as long as you're still in temper.




i temper with mycryo, i usually have around 35 c on tempering (white choc) how high can i heat it without loosing the temper ???


cheers

t.

Edited by schneich, 30 October 2006 - 04:01 PM.

toertchen toertchen
patissier chocolatier cafe
cologne, germany

#67 John DePaula

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Posted 30 October 2006 - 06:55 PM

Correct... chocolate was too cold.  Slightly warmer should fix the problem, as long as you're still in temper.




i temper with mycryo, i usually have around 35 c on tempering (white choc) how high can i heat it without loosing the temper ???


cheers

t.

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At 35C I don't see how you're in temper... seems way too high.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#68 Desiderio

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 03:22 AM

I use mycryo as well , but I work around 31 for dark , 29 for milk.35 seems t high for me as well.
Vanessa

#69 schneich

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 01:59 AM

i mean i add the mycyro stuff at 35, just as the manual tells me...
normally i wait for a few minutes and check the temper on a cold marble.
if the temper is good i smear the acetate ;-)

so is my temperature maybe too hot to bind to the transfer ???? that would be weird...







p.s. callebaut says you should add the mycyro at 35c. sometimes it seems to me that the tiny mycryo crystals dont really "melt" the chocolate at 35c, it looks as it has tiny breadcrumbs in it...
now i use to add the mycryo at 35,2 or 35,3 and it perfeclty melts...
toertchen toertchen
patissier chocolatier cafe
cologne, germany





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