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How To Make Transfer Sheets

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#31 lapasterie

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Posted 14 September 2005 - 05:10 PM

I went to a demo at the Phily candy show and the chef said he melts his colored cocoa butter in a yogurt maker. Hesaid that if you put the bottles in the machine overnight it is just the right temperature. He also said the yogurt makers can be found at Walmart for about $15.00.

#32 chocartist

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Posted 14 September 2005 - 05:47 PM

I went to a demo at the Phily candy show and the chef said he melts his colored cocoa butter in a yogurt maker. Hesaid that if you put the bottles in the machine overnight it is just the right temperature.  He also said the yogurt makers can be found at Walmart for about $15.00.

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Melting cocoa butter in a yogurt machine is a very slow process. It takes longer to melt cocoa butter than you might think. I use the yogurt machine to keep the bottles of cocoa butter warm once melted. I bought mine at Sur La Table. If you can find one for $15.00, grab it.

#33 stscam

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Posted 19 October 2005 - 11:01 AM

This screen printing business to make chocolate transfer sheets is way harder than it looks. But I think I'm making progress.

1) I designed a logo in Pagemaker, then printed it in black ink onto a transparency sheet.

2) Next I prepared the screen by laying down a layer of emulsion front and back, letting it dry, then exposing the transparency for 17 minutes with a 300w light source. Developing was just a matter of washing the screen with lukewarm water. I used regular emulsion, rather than food safe, because this is just experimentation at this point.

3) The third step was to make the actual transfer sheet. For these early trials I used art store acetate as the base medium. I melted cocoa butter and colored it with Chef Rubber powders (going for a yellow-gold).

4) After the stencil was dry I poured tempered chocolate over the logos, let them set and pulled them up.

Here are some of the things I've learned so far:

- Steps 1) and 2) are really easy. Success is almost 100% assured.

- Step 3 is fraught with opportunities to fail.

- Make sure that your cocoa butter is not too liquid. Lloyd says it should be the consistency of sour cream, and Lloyd's the man. I had a lot of trouble getting it to that viscosity and more trouble holding it there.

- I started off using a standard printing squeege. This seemed to force too much material through the screen, so that the edges smudged badly.

- Then I tried a small palette knife. The smudging wasn't so bad, but it was still a problem.

- Next I tried a small artist's sponge, daubing the cocoa butter into the stencil. This seemed to give me more control, with cleaner images, but I wasn't always able to get enough color onto the acetate sheet.

- So then came the ultimate test - pouring chocolate onto the acetate and see what happens. Well, what happened was that the image transferred nicely, but it was so dull and dark as to be nearly invisible. That was disappointing.

Now it's back to the drawing board (or the mixing bowl) to try some other variations. I'm thinking that my colored cocoa butter isn't saturated enough - that the color needs to be stronger and more opaque. I'm also going to try a different kind of plastic as the transfer sheet medium. My chocolate, BTW, was 58% Cacao Berry couverture.

Any thoughts from fellow e-gulleteers would be most welcomed. I'd attach photos, but there's nothing particularly photogenic as yet.


Cheers,
Steve Smith
Glacier Country

#34 Trishiad

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Posted 19 October 2005 - 11:22 AM

How fun Steve! Did you start with colored cocoa butter and add powder for a different color? Do you think it would work just as well with white chocolate or would that be too thin?

#35 stscam

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Posted 19 October 2005 - 02:41 PM

I'm not sure how white chocolate might work. Until I started this project I'd never done any screen printing at all, so call me NEWBIE.

Cheers,
Steve Smith
Glacier Country

#36 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 19 October 2005 - 08:40 PM

I have played around doing this and find that I can't make it work using straight cocoa butter colors. They need to be in an opaque base as you realized. The best I can do is start with white (from PCB) and add some color to it. Adding the colored cocoa butter to the white opaque cocoa butter doesn't work well. It thins it down too much (makes it transparent) and I can't get the color intensity I want, only pastels.

BUT it you buy colors for cocoa, those are different then colored cocoa butter. They are closer to being like a food coloring paste, but thinner. They will let you get an intense color with minimal added cocoa butter thinning down your opaque base. I've bought these colors thru Albert Uster and believe it or not, my local Michaels craft stores. They come in like 4 oz. bottles from Uster and about .5 oz jar at the craft store. Those little half oz. jars of black will color my chocolate a dark black! These colors should give you what you need when screen printing.

When I use my PCB colors I nuke the whole bottle on 30% power for like 2 minutes. Just enough to melt parts of the bottle but not the whole thing. I shake it up to melt more in the bottle. Then I let it set for a couple minutes. Then my colors are the right consistancy for me.

Where as, if I heat my PCB color and pour it into a bowl and let it set, then it goes from liquid to solid faster..........more surface exposed to cool air, verses holding it in the bottle.

I think your right on the verge of getting this. I do think that the consistancy of your "ink" (in this case your cocoa butter) is critical. If it's too warm/thin it will bleed and apply too thinly. I do however think a rubber scraper is the correct way to get an even layer..........you may just need a little more practice or a thinner lighter rubber scraper. The ones they use for standard silk screen inks are rather thick and bulky.

I'm not totally certain (because it's been about 20 years since I last silk screened) but the you should be able to use frisket as a food safe block. It's basicly acetate with an adhesive........I think (it used to be anyway). But then you cut in your image by hand, then apply it to your screen. Your using a light sensitive emulsion right now, and I really question that it's food safe. The reason I mention this is, it is something you need to look into now. If you can't find a food safe product to use as your block, theres no point in perfecting this. Unless your willing to hand cut your own stencils using frisket.

#37 bkeith

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Posted 20 October 2005 - 10:48 AM

You might also consider adding white powdered color to your cocoa butter. That'll add the opacity and might also help with the consistency. Depending on how much you add (white and/or other powder colors), you may be able to get closer to a sour cream consistency without having to try to get there via temperature alone.
B. Keith Ryder
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#38 stscam

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Posted 20 October 2005 - 09:43 PM

Wendy & Keith, thanks for the input.

Today I tried to just paint my colored cocoa butter mixture directly onto the acetate to see how it opaque it really is. It took two thick coats to get a nearly solid layer onto the medium. The transfer was better than through the screen, but still not nearly as bright as a commercial transfer sheet.

The idea of adding white to the cocoa butter makes a lot of sense, as it should add density to the base. I'll try that next.

I've got some PCB colored cocoa butter here, so I'll try that too.

Thanks & cheers,

Edited by stscam, 20 October 2005 - 09:44 PM.

Steve Smith
Glacier Country

#39 stscam

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Posted 22 October 2005 - 02:07 PM

Saturday's experiment in transfer making involved: adding white color powder to my cocoa butter mixture in an effort to make it more opaque; making sure the consistency of the mixture was sour-creamy rather than liquid; and using a plastic bench scraper to apply more pressure to the "ink" to force more through the screen.

The results were encouraging. Adding more white helped "darken" the color. Using a less liquid "ink" and applying more pressure seemed to push more onto the acetate. It's still not as strong an image as I would like, but it's far closer than any previous effort. The thicker "ink" helped, but I still got some smear on the plastic - probably from applying too much pressure.

I'm also thinking the screen I'm using is too fine (bought it already in a frame at an art store), and the cocoa butter is having a tough time "oozing" through. The lines of the screen fabric are also visible on the finished image. I'm going to look around for something less fine. Also - does anybody think using a roller rather than a straight squeege (like the scraper) would work any better?

Making incremental progress. Maybe pictures soon.

Cheers,
Steve Smith
Glacier Country

#40 Lloydchoc

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Posted 22 October 2005 - 10:23 PM

A few tips on transfer sheets:
Use powdered food color and plain cocoa butter--don't use the expensive stuff from PCB or chef rubber. Use Titanium dioxide to make it opaque. Use very fine screen material (I have used up to 355 threads/inch). Use the stiffest squeege you can find (at least 70 durometer).

Most of the emulsions are probably food safe--Ulano only had the TZ certified--most of the other emulsions have a similar chemical makeup.

Screen printing is more difficult than it appears--especially if you are making up your own "ink". I'm still throwing away a lot of prints, but then I am trying to work to a finer tolerance than what is available commercially.

#41 Desiderio

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Posted 14 April 2006 - 10:57 PM

I am sure there is a thres of this around , however I will ask anyway :biggrin: .
To make your own transfer sheets can I use normal acetate sheets out of a craft store ( if they have any), and then just proceed with colored cocoa butter?
If is the case the rubber chef premade colored cocoa butter will work ok, or I should buy just the color and do my mix with the cocoa butter?


Thank you for your help :rolleyes:
Vanessa

#42 Kerry Beal

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 05:38 AM

I am sure there is a thres of this around , however I will ask  anyway  :biggrin: .
To make your own transfer sheets  can I use normal acetate sheets out of a craft store ( if they have any), and then just proceed with colored cocoa butter?
If is the case the rubber chef premade colored cocoa butter will work ok, or I should buy just the color and do my mix with the cocoa butter?


Thank you for your help  :rolleyes:

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Either the premixed colours in cocoa butter or the ones you mix yourself will work fine. See this thread for some links to opacifying your colours for transfers.

You can find acetate at craft stores, office supply stores or art stores.

Edited to make 'this thread' into a link - what a neat feature.

Edited by Kerry Beal, 15 April 2006 - 05:48 AM.


#43 HQAntithesis

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 04:35 PM

Hi, I just ran through this thread because I was interested to see if there was any mention of having to temper the cocoa butter before applying it to the transfer sheet but I couldn't find anything. Does the cocoa butter have to be tempered before being applied? I've never actually tried tempering it before but have read that it is necessary (though not in direct reference to this application :huh: ).

#44 Desiderio

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 04:47 PM

Hi, I just ran through this thread because I was interested to see if there was any mention of having to temper the cocoa butter before applying it to the transfer sheet but I couldn't find anything. Does the cocoa butter have to be tempered before being applied? I've never actually tried tempering it before but have read that it is necessary (though not in direct reference to this application  :huh: ).

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Hello , cocoa butter does not need to be tempered prior use.
Vanessa

#45 John DePaula

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 04:47 PM

Hi, I just ran through this thread because I was interested to see if there was any mention of having to temper the cocoa butter before applying it to the transfer sheet but I couldn't find anything. Does the cocoa butter have to be tempered before being applied? I've never actually tried tempering it before but have read that it is necessary (though not in direct reference to this application  :huh: ).

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I don't try to temper the cocoa butter (I don't think you can temper cocoa butter, per se) and have had no problems.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#46 Art

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Posted 16 April 2006 - 08:19 AM

I don't try to temper the cocoa butter (I don't think you can temper cocoa butter, per se) and have had no problems.

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Tempering is basically simply getting the cocoa butter to crystalize properly. Chocolate as we know it is simply cocoa butter, cocoa solids (i.e., basically what you have with cocoa powder), sugar and sometimes an emulsifier. The cocoa solids, sugar, and emulsifier do not play a role in the crystalization of the cocoa butter. (There are some exceptions.)

When I purchase cocoa butter in bulk (i.e., by the palate), it comes in tempered form.

So, yes, it is possible to temper cocoa butter by itself.

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#47 Desiderio

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 12:24 PM

Silly question I know , but i dont have problem making transfer sheet ( got some arts school in my past :raz: ) the trouble is how to use them correctly , I never used them before I made one to try and maybe the acetate I am using isnt the right type beacue the colored cocoa butter stayed on the sheet and not on the chocolate surface , some of them did transfer ok , but still the surface didnt look nice and smooth .Is there any method to use transfer sheet properly , I am doing something wrong ( probably yes ! ).And there is one type of acetate better than other , I think I bought the one that doesnt bleed if u stencil and paint on it and have the feeling that might be it , the color stay on the surface and doesnt tranfer pn other surfaces.

Thank you vanessa
Vanessa

#48 SweetSide

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 12:28 PM

Silly question I know , but i dont have problem making transfer sheet ( got some arts school in my past  :raz: ) the trouble is how to use them correctly , I never used them before I made one to try and maybe the acetate I am using isnt the right type beacue the colored cocoa butter stayed on the sheet and not on the chocolate surface , some of them did transfer ok , but still the surface didnt look nice and smooth .Is there any method  to use transfer sheet properly , I am doing something wrong ( probably yes ! ).And there is one type of acetate better than other , I think I bought the one that doesnt bleed if u stencil and paint on it and have the feeling that might be it , the color stay on the surface and doesnt tranfer pn other surfaces.

Thank you vanessa

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Is it perfectly clear and shiny, or is one or both sides slightly rough?
Cheryl, The Sweet Side

#49 Desiderio

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 12:40 PM

Silly question I know , but i dont have problem making transfer sheet ( got some arts school in my past  :raz: ) the trouble is how to use them correctly , I never used them before I made one to try and maybe the acetate I am using isnt the right type beacue the colored cocoa butter stayed on the sheet and not on the chocolate surface , some of them did transfer ok , but still the surface didnt look nice and smooth .Is there any method  to use transfer sheet properly , I am doing something wrong ( probably yes ! ).And there is one type of acetate better than other , I think I bought the one that doesnt bleed if u stencil and paint on it and have the feeling that might be it , the color stay on the surface and doesnt tranfer pn other surfaces.

Thank you vanessa

View Post


Is it perfectly clear and shiny, or is one or both sides slightly rough?

View Post


it is perfecly clear on both sides ,on the package it says "wet media film specially treated on both sides to sccept paint, markers airbrush, without bleeding crawling or chpping" dura-lar the acetate alternative
Vanessa

#50 SweetSide

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 03:55 PM

Silly question I know , but i dont have problem making transfer sheet ( got some arts school in my past  :raz: ) the trouble is how to use them correctly , I never used them before I made one to try and maybe the acetate I am using isnt the right type beacue the colored cocoa butter stayed on the sheet and not on the chocolate surface , some of them did transfer ok , but still the surface didnt look nice and smooth .Is there any method  to use transfer sheet properly , I am doing something wrong ( probably yes ! ).And there is one type of acetate better than other , I think I bought the one that doesnt bleed if u stencil and paint on it and have the feeling that might be it , the color stay on the surface and doesnt tranfer pn other surfaces.

Thank you vanessa

View Post


Is it perfectly clear and shiny, or is one or both sides slightly rough?

View Post


it is perfecly clear on both sides ,on the package it says "wet media film specially treated on both sides to sccept paint, markers airbrush, without bleeding crawling or chpping" dura-lar the acetate alternative

View Post



I wouldn't use it. It may not be food safe, and the treatment that is preventing the chipping is also preventing the cocoa butter from releasing.
Cheryl, The Sweet Side

#51 Desiderio

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Posted 30 April 2006 - 03:43 PM

I think I am going to order some premade transfer sheets!!
I dont understand why but my colored coca butter it stays on the sheets doesnt transfer on the chocolate when I put them on it ,I wait till it get dry the peel the sheet and the darn colored cocoa butter stays on the sheet!!!
I know there is something wrong cause I havent seen anyone here talking about this problem.So I dont know what that could be.
Vanessa

#52 stscam

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Posted 01 May 2006 - 03:07 PM

Vanessa,

We still have a few issues with cocoa butter sticking to the transfer sheet and not to the chocolate, so we're not experts . . . yet. But here are some things you might try:

How long do you let your cocoa butter sheets set? Try letting them set at least overnight (if you're not already doing this).

Do you let the chocolate you pour onto the sheets set in a fridge? That might help.

And make very sure that the chocolate has completely set before removing the pieces. They should lift cleanly, without sticking, off the acetate.

For what it's worth, I've never had a similar problem with commercial transfer sheets. But making your own is a noble thing.

Cheers,

Steven
Steve Smith
Glacier Country

#53 Desiderio

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Posted 01 May 2006 - 05:58 PM

Vanessa,

We still have a few issues with cocoa butter sticking to the transfer sheet and not to the chocolate, so we're not experts . . . yet.  But here are some things you might try:

How long do you let your cocoa butter sheets set?  Try letting them set at least overnight (if you're not already doing this).

Do you let the chocolate you pour onto the sheets set in a fridge? That might help.

And make very sure that the chocolate has completely set before removing the pieces.  They should lift cleanly, without sticking, off the acetate.

For what it's worth, I've never had a similar problem with commercial transfer sheets.  But making your own is a noble thing.

Cheers,

Steven

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Thank you Thank you Steven :smile:
I actually didnt try all the things you have listed :raz: .I guess I have should treat the sheets like the painted molds ,so I will try to follow these steps then, before giving up ( but still probably buy some store bought :rolleyes: ).
Thank you again for taking the time to explain this to me .

Grazie

Edited by Desiderio, 01 May 2006 - 05:58 PM.

Vanessa

#54 alanamoana

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 11:43 AM

Vanessa,

I have been playing around a little bit and thought you might like to see this...my results are very crappy as I was just messing around with a bit of not so nice cocoa butter, etc.

I guess that's enough excuses:

Posted Image

This is a picture of a fairly large rubber stamp. It has four designs, one on each side of the cube, leaving two sides clear for holding onto the stamp itself. I bought it at Michael's, the craft store.

Posted Image

This picture is of a sheet of chocolate onto which I transfered the design.

I got the idea from another thread which discussed using rubber stamps to make transfers or designs on chocolate.

I melted some cocoa butter and used a paint roller (they sell very small ones for detailed work)...probably not food safe, but this was just an experiment. I rolled the cocoa butter onto the rubber stamp and stamped it onto a piece of acetate. I let it sit overnight. The next day, I spread a little bit of tempered chocolate onto the stamped images. After it crystallized, I peeled off the acetate and voila!

I'm trying to think of better ways to get the cocoa butter onto the stamp. The first time I did this, I just dipped the stamp into the cocoa butter, but it didn't allow for a clean impression of the image. The paint roller worked pretty well, but you lose a lot of cocoa butter in the fibers of the roller and I don't think it is food safe. I want to find a good quality sponge (more like a stamp pad) to do this with.

Another thing I don't love about this, or cocoa butter in general...it is murder to clean off of anything. Including your hands! It takes the hottest water you can stand and tons of soap. This might stop me from experimenting as I hate that feeling. Sort of like working with shortening :smile:

Anyway...just thought I'd show you what I'm up to.

#55 SweetSide

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 12:52 PM

Cool -- I love the stamp too. They do sell stiff rubber rollers, like a printer would use for ink, much like these here CLICK. Still not sure on the food safe issue, but at least it isn't furry like a paint roller. If it can pick up the fine grooves of a fingerprint, it should work for your stamp.
Cheryl, The Sweet Side

#56 Desiderio

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 01:00 PM

Vanessa,

I have been playing around a little bit and thought you might like to see this...my results are very crappy as I was just messing around with a bit of not so nice cocoa butter, etc.

I guess that's enough excuses:

Posted Image

This is a picture of a fairly large rubber stamp.  It has four designs, one on each side of the cube, leaving two sides clear for holding onto the stamp itself.  I bought it at Michael's, the craft store.

Posted Image

This picture is of a sheet of chocolate onto which I transfered the design.

I got the idea from another thread which discussed using rubber stamps to make transfers or designs on chocolate.

I melted some cocoa butter and used a paint roller (they sell very small ones for detailed work)...probably not food safe, but this was just an experiment.  I rolled the cocoa butter onto the rubber stamp and stamped it onto a piece of acetate.  I let it sit overnight.  The next day, I spread a little bit of tempered chocolate onto the stamped images.  After it crystallized, I peeled off the acetate and voila!

I'm trying to think of better ways to get the cocoa butter onto the stamp.  The first time I did this, I just dipped the stamp into the cocoa butter, but it didn't allow for a clean impression of the image.  The paint roller worked pretty well, but you lose a lot of cocoa butter in the fibers of the roller and I don't think it is food safe.  I want to find a good quality sponge (more like a stamp pad) to do this with.

Another thing I don't love about this, or cocoa butter in general...it is murder to clean off of anything.  Including your hands!  It takes the hottest water you can stand and tons of soap.  This might stop me from experimenting as I hate that feeling.  Sort of like working with shortening  :smile:

Anyway...just thought I'd show you what I'm up to.

View Post




Simply wonderfull!!
I just love the result you obtained , I think it looks very neat ( I know might be impossible to achieve the perfection of the store bought ones ) but it sure look great .I havent try make anymore transfer sheet ,I was on mother's day production, I will have to get my hand dirty again soon though.

Thank you for showing your experiment I really really love it :biggrin:
Vanessa

#57 stscam

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 02:56 PM

Alanamoana,

Nice results with the rubber stamp!

We too saw the stamp thread and began a bunch of experimenting, and got really excited by the results. I think we're at a point now where we could do a demo for other readers. In the meantime, here's some info:

This picture shows some early experiments with the process. In this case the pieces are solid tmpered couverture poured onto the transfer sheet (seen in the background).

Posted Image

Apparently rubber stamping is a huge hobby (associated with scrapbooking). We have a local hobby store that makes custom stamps right from computer files. They're laser cut and the detail is pretty amazing. We pay just $5.00 for a 1-1/4" square custom stamp (ideal size for palets).

We also use a standard stamp pad. You can buy blank ones and "ink" them with cocoa butter. The ones we use are made by Adirondack. The box says they are "non toxic."

The amount of titanium dioxide you use in your "ink" is critical to the process, because the opacity will enhance the brightness of the finished items. This will take experimentation. So far we've stuck to a gold-yellow because it seems to read the best.

One technique we learned from "stampers" was to touch the wet pad to the stamp (rather than vice-versa). This gives you more control over how much ink goes on to the stamp.

We use a hair dryer to keep the cocoa butter ink at about 95F and slightly damp. You don't want the crevices of the pad to fill up with ink. Wipe the stamp frequently if you need to.

If you make a mistake, just wipe the ink off the acetate and do it again. After you've finished making the chocolates, gently wash the acetate sheet and reuse.

With practice the end results can be pretty good (but never as clean and bright as commercial transfer sheets). Stull, stamping opens up a whole new world to chocolatiers.

I'll try to put together and post a demo in the next week or two. In the meantime, have fun!

Cheers,

Steve
Steve Smith
Glacier Country

#58 alanamoana

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Posted 08 May 2006 - 03:05 PM

Apparently rubber stamping is a huge hobby (associated with scrapbooking). We have a local hobby store that makes custom stamps right from computer files. They're laser cut and the detail is pretty amazing. We pay just $5.00 for a 1-1/4" square custom stamp (ideal size for palets).

We also use a standard stamp pad. You can buy blank ones and "ink" them with cocoa butter. The ones we use are made by Adirondack. The box says they are "non toxic."

The amount of titanium dioxide you use in your "ink" is critical to the process, because the opacity will enhance the brightness of the finished items. This will take experimentation. So far we've stuck to a gold-yellow because it seems to read the best.

One technique we learned from "stampers" was to touch the wet pad to the stamp (rather than vice-versa). This gives you more control over how much ink goes on to the stamp. 

We use a hair dryer to keep the cocoa butter ink at about 95F and slightly damp. You don't want the crevices of the pad to fill up with ink.  Wipe the stamp frequently if you need to.

View Post


Steve, thanks for more ideas. I knew you could buy "blank" stamp pads, but could never find them at the local Michael's. I guess I'll have to go to on-line sources. Also, the fact that you can get custom stamps so inexpensively is great! I'll have to see what resources there are around here.

With the one rubber stamp that I have (with the four designs)...it seems the designs that are more just outlines work the best. They give sharp clean images. The other designs that have a lot of "solid" surface area tend to hold too much cocoa butter and when you lift up the stamp you get areas of blobby color. You know what I mean, I'm sure! edited to add: compare the solid letter "G" you've stamped to the outline letter "G"...just cleaner and nicer looking on the outline.

When you say you use a hair dryer to keep the cocoa butter warm, do you just heat the ink pad itself? I guess you could heat up the stamp too to keep the cocoa butter from setting up in the crevices of the stamp...

Well, it is fun! Also, if you want to customize things, much cheaper than other companies who charge insane set-up fees for artwork! Unless, of course, you have to make thousands...

Also, what kind of acetate do you use? The firm kind or the kind you find purchased transfer sheets screened onto?

Thanks again for your photos and comments!
Alana

Edited by alanamoana, 08 May 2006 - 03:07 PM.


#59 duckduck

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Posted 09 May 2006 - 01:13 PM

I recently found this website that has an alphabetical list of stamp companies, a list of "angel" companies that will allow you to sell their hand stamped image and a forum for stampers. Lots of info.
http://www.rubberstampinglinks.com/
Pamela Wilkinson
www.portlandfood.org
Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

#60 duckduck

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  • Location:portland, oregon

Posted 27 May 2006 - 02:39 PM

Another note from an old stamper...do not immerse your stamps in water. You'll lose the foam cushion that holds the rubber onto the wood or acrylic block. It will start to slide. If this happens, you can nuke it in the microwave to peel it all apart and buy a new sheet of the grey foam cushion from a rubber stamp store and replace it.
Pamela Wilkinson
www.portlandfood.org
Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."





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