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Best Way To Cook Pizza At Home


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#1 DutchMuse

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Posted 11 December 2004 - 06:31 PM

What's the BEST way to cook pizza at home? I have a pan from Williams-Sonoma that has holes in the bottom, and a friend (who made an amazing pizza) recommended putting it in an UNHEATED oven in the bottom, then heating the oven. But...better/other recommendations for pizza at home? I want to make a great pizza.

#2 NulloModo

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Posted 11 December 2004 - 06:52 PM

From my understanding, the best pizza comes from a pizza stone, pizza directly on the stone, and a blazingly irresponsibly hot oven.
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And hang the bastard high!

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#3 EdS

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Posted 11 December 2004 - 08:05 PM

What's the BEST way to cook pizza at home? I have a pan from Williams-Sonoma that has holes in the bottom, and a friend (who made an amazing pizza) recommended putting it in an UNHEATED oven in the bottom, then heating the oven. But...better/other recommendations for pizza at home? I want to make a great pizza.

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#4 daves

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Posted 11 December 2004 - 08:38 PM

Agree with NulloModo: on a stone in a very hot oven. Too hot to responsibly do it indoors. I know someone who build one of these in his backyard.

I didn't go that far, but I do make pizza and bread in my kamado bbq. I use a double layer stone to keep the top one at ambient instead of fire temperature. I run up the temp to 750 or so with oak lump, and let the heat soak through the ceramic. I then run a damp cloth over the top stone to cool it a bit before sliding the pizza onto it. Minutes later the pizza is done.

We've done bread, pita, and lots of pizza like this.

#5 Daniel

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Posted 12 December 2004 - 07:30 AM

The pizza dough i make is made with semolina and all purpose flour. My question is has anyone tried the pizza dough recipe on todd english's web site.. I saw him make it on Martha Stewart not too long ago and it looked excellent.

#6 rlibkind

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Posted 12 December 2004 - 10:19 AM

You can get a good backyard gas grill up to 600 degrees.
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#7 chefdg

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Posted 12 December 2004 - 11:57 AM

DiGerano. :biggrin:
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#8 scott123

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Posted 13 December 2004 - 07:57 AM

It all depends on what you define as great pizza. Great pizza comes in a myriad number of forms and everyone has their favorite. I could write a book on New York Style Vulcan oven pizza, but if that doesn't float your boat, I'd be wasting my time.

Describe your favorite pizza and we'll go from there.

#9 Daniel

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Posted 13 December 2004 - 08:54 AM

Well, I answered my own question. Started out making the Todd English Pizza Dough. While I started making the dough, I set the oven with pizza stone in it to 550. After letting it rise for 2 hours the oven was ridiculously hot and ready to go. I rolled out some dough, trace cut it with a plate to make a perfect circle, unnecessary but who cares. I then added home made tomato sauce, home made pesto, chopped up chicken sausage, proscuitto, mushrooms, mozzarella, and parmesan... It was awesome. I definitely think that adding proscuitto to a pizza is almost a must.

The crust was perfectly done. The pizza stayed perfectly supported and crisp while i was just holding one end of the circle.. The crust was light and crunchy. All the ingredients were perfectly cook, in a really short time. Wanting to a make a pizza tonight with a bechamel sauce too, I think.

#10 Daniel

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Posted 13 December 2004 - 09:01 AM

My problem is, i have had several failed stromboli attempts..For some reason, my ingrediants keep falling out.. Also alot of times the sauce soaks through, and leaves the dough all mushy.. Does anyone have a fool proof method for making these guys?

#11 scott123

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Posted 14 December 2004 - 12:13 AM

Daniel, I highly recommend taking a stab at pulling your pizza dough into shape rather than rolling it/cutting the edges. A rolled pizza just doesn't compare to a pulled one. No need to toss it in the air - unless you've got people around you want to impress :)

#12 Daniel

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Posted 14 December 2004 - 07:45 AM

Daniel, I highly recommend taking a stab at pulling your pizza dough into shape rather than rolling it/cutting the edges. A rolled pizza just doesn't compare to a pulled one. No need to toss it in the air - unless you've got people around you want to impress :)

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Are you saying that if i rolled a pizza or I pulled it with my hands you would be able to tell the difference.. What are the differences.. I am going to have to try this tonight.

#13 jmolinari

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Posted 14 December 2004 - 12:42 PM

Daniel, I highly recommend taking a stab at pulling your pizza dough into shape rather than rolling it/cutting the edges. A rolled pizza just doesn't compare to a pulled one. No need to toss it in the air - unless you've got people around you want to impress :)

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Are you saying that if i rolled a pizza or I pulled it with my hands you would be able to tell the difference.. What are the differences.. I am going to have to try this tonight.

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They are very different in that with a rolled pizza you have a completely level surface, with a hand stretched and tossed pizza you have what in italy they call a "cornicione" or a border. This is the outer edge of the pizza that is slightly thicker, and has more puff than the center area of the pizza.

jason

#14 Daniel

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Posted 14 December 2004 - 01:33 PM

Perhaps its the way i roll it, but i start my roller from the center to the outer edges so, my center is thinner then the edges as well. I really believe that it doesnt matter the wether you roll it or toss it.. I have heard many debates between the tossers and the pullers and they will swear there is a difference between those two processes.

#15 Lexica

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Posted 14 December 2004 - 02:01 PM

I read somewhere* that rolling out a pizza crust compresses the dough in a way that stretching doesn't. Also that stretching allows the crust to develop a "skin", which is important for the texture.

*One down side to being a voracious reader is that I frequently forget where I read something. <sigh>
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#16 Daniel

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Posted 14 December 2004 - 02:17 PM

I searched the web and have not seen anything other then people giving their personal opinions.. The opinions are going either way.. I actually just read a pizza recipe from wolfgang puck comfirming jmolinari's advice. Puck advised people to roll the dough, but to allow the center to be thinner then the sides.

Edited by Daniel, 14 December 2004 - 02:18 PM.


#17 misstenacity

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Posted 14 December 2004 - 03:39 PM

On the soggy crust question, I use my "Misto" oil sprayer to coat the dough with a fine layer of olive oil before I put the tomato sauce on. Seems to do the trick.

Obviously you could use any kind of fat, if you wanted a different flavor than olive oil or none at all.

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#18 scott123

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Posted 14 December 2004 - 09:20 PM

Perhaps its the way i roll it, but i start my roller from the center to the outer edges so, my center is thinner then the edges as well.  I really believe that it doesnt matter the wether you roll it or toss it.. I have heard many debates between the tossers and the pullers and they will swear there is a difference between those two processes.

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I've notice that when I used to roll my pizza crust, the roller would force air to the edge and form small bubbles that would pop. When I pull the pizza, this doesn't happen.

The overall difference between rolled and pulled dough probably isn't huge, though. My recommendation to pull rather than roll/cut was more focused on the cutting than the rolling. Cutting dough gives you an unsealed edge. With an unsealed edge, you're seriously impairing your oven spring.