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An Ideal Negroni


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#181 lesliec

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 07:59 PM

You need a drink, maybe ...


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#182 Rafa

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 11:17 PM

Remove the "maybe" and we have ourselves a forum motto. 


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#183 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 01:12 PM

By product of stupidity and confusion I invented a drink tonight. It was meant to be one of the Herban Botanists from here:

 

1oz Botanivore Gin

1oz Cynar

1oz Cocchi Americano

Bittermens Orange Cream Citrate

Orange Twist

 

... but I accidentally made it into:

 

Délit de Fuite

 

1oz Botanivore Gin

1/2oz Cynar

1/2oz Campari

1oz Cocchi Americano

Homemade Orange Cream Citrate

Orange Twist

 

and it was good. The orange citrate is rather sweet; I will add some Angostura next time to modify the creamy flavour. At that point I don't know whether Negroni can stretch to cover it but in any case it is eminently repeatable.

 

001 (640x480).jpg

 

 

 

 


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#184 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 01:36 PM

This looks very nice, PV (I like the name too).

 

So how do you make orange cream citrate?



#185 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 01:43 PM

I reduced a few TBS cream, ~1tsp citric acid and 3 big whacks of orange peel until they went, um, smaller (translucent and sticky).

 

I took inspiration from the descriptions online but I haven't tasted the original so have no idea if that was right. It seemed to work :smile:


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#186 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 01:45 PM

Very cool. Thanks.



#187 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 10:56 AM

These past few weeks the Varnish in LA has been celebrating its five year anniversary with a month-long celebration where past bartenders come to serve their creations. I haven't been able to attend but I am there in spirit...

Last night Chris Bostik served the Nice Legs cocktail, another delightful Negroni variation. This one is the red version of the White Negroni. Suze for the bitter element, and barolo chinato for the aromatized wine (it's a quinquina made from Barolo wine).

 

Nice Legs: 1.5 oz Beefeater gin, 0.75 oz suze, 0.75 Cocchi barolo chinato, rock(s), orange peel.

 

13233505843_eef72d0866_z.jpg
 

 



#188 campus five

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 02:57 PM

Funny I saw that recipe in my twitter feed, and immediately sent it to evernote for safe keeping. I believe I'll have that before dinner. 



#189 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 18 March 2014 - 03:49 PM

It's a good one. It got a little write-up a while back in LA Weekly (Best Negroni Variation) and Serious Eats (although they were using Salers at the time).



#190 haresfur

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 02:54 AM

I have come to the conclusion that I just don't like vermouth much - at least the ones I've tried.  So I made a Negroni substituting Dubonnet and was happier.  It is sweeter so you may want to dial back but what I found interesting was a spicy note and the Gin coming forward more.

 

No picture - it looks like a Negroni.


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#191 EvergreenDan

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 02:47 PM

I have come to the conclusion that I just don't like vermouth much - at least the ones I've tried.  

Oh dear. Let us help our friend. What vermouths have you tried?


Edited by EvergreenDan, 19 March 2014 - 02:47 PM.

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#192 lesliec

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 06:11 PM

Oh dear. Let us help our friend.

 

We must, indeed, come to the aid of Haresfur.

 

The last (but one) vermouth I bought was Dubonnet, but I've now reverted to Punt e Mes as my 'standard'.  I've also been very happy with Dolin.  The Dubonnet was OK, but not as good (to my taste) in things like Negronis as the other two.

 

If you can find it, there's a Catalan vermouth (Priorat Vermut) which is delicious just on its own, chilled with a bit of orange zest.  But I'd go Punt e Mes any time for mixing.


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#193 haresfur

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 06:56 PM

Oh dear. Let us help our friend. What vermouths have you tried?

 

Mainly M&R and Cinzano.  I don't think my Dan Murphy's has Punt e Mes anymore and I've never seen Dolin. I can get Nolly Prat but it is about twice as expensive and I wasn't impressed when I was first getting into cocktails.  Since I can only get large bottles and am reluctant to buy a bottle to have it go bad, I figured I will hold on revisiting dry vermouth drinks for trips to bars.

 

I didn't think Dubonnet was considered vermouth.  I used to drink it on the rocks as a kid (ok, my parents used to drink it on the rocks and I sampled).


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#194 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 07:58 PM

 
I didn't think Dubonnet was considered vermouth.  I used to drink it on the rocks as a kid (ok, my parents used to drink it on the rocks and I sampled).

You are correct. Dubonnet is an aromatized wine, but not a vermouth. It's a quinquina.

#195 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 01:41 AM

Mainly M&R and Cinzano.  I don't think my Dan Murphy's has Punt e Mes anymore and I've never seen Dolin. I can get Nolly Prat but it is about twice as expensive and I wasn't impressed when I was first getting into cocktails.  Since I can only get large bottles and am reluctant to buy a bottle to have it go bad, I figured I will hold on revisiting dry vermouth drinks for trips to bars.

 

I didn't think Dubonnet was considered vermouth.  I used to drink it on the rocks as a kid (ok, my parents used to drink it on the rocks and I sampled).

 

Nicks sells reasonably priced 1L bottles of Punt e Mes. They also sell Dolin.


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#196 campus five

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 10:28 AM

Mainly M&R and Cinzano.  I don't think my Dan Murphy's has Punt e Mes anymore and I've never seen Dolin. I can get Nolly Prat but it is about twice as expensive and I wasn't impressed when I was first getting into cocktails.  Since I can only get large bottles and am reluctant to buy a bottle to have it go bad, I figured I will hold on revisiting dry vermouth drinks for trips to bars.

 

I didn't think Dubonnet was considered vermouth.  I used to drink it on the rocks as a kid (ok, my parents used to drink it on the rocks and I sampled).

 

Yeah, I really don't enjoy M&R or Cinzano... or Dolin Rouge for that matter. And I really, really hate Noilly Prat.

There's an "oregano" note that I really dislike (kind of like bad faux-italian food), and Noilly Prat almost has on "olive" note that I find especially nauseating.

Also, I found all of them very "thin". They couldn't really stand up to the whiskey in a manhattan for me. 

 

But Carpano Antica, Cocchi Vermouth Di Torrino, and Contratto Rosso are all amazing.

I used to be a die-hard Antica fan, but that vanilla can be a bit much, and the Cocchi and Contratto have enough fullness without being quite as overbearing. 

Contratto may be my current favorite, but I haven't yet starting using the bottle I bought, so I haven't really played with it enough to compare.

We did a tasting and it came out tops. 

Still, I'll take Antica in a heartbeat if the other two aren't around. 

 

If I'd only had the first four, I'd call it a day with Sweet Vermouth, too.

Mahattans and Negronis are perhaps my two favorite cocktails, and without decent vermouth, they can be completely ruined. 

 

That said, Cinzano stands out for me as the least bad option. It has a similar profile to M&R, but less so, if that makes sense. 

Also, I find sufficient dilution in a negroni to help a little with mediocre vermouth. Of course, there's nothing that'll make Noilly Prat Rouge drinkable to me. 


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#197 lennyt

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 08:58 PM

Yeah, I really don't enjoy M&R or Cinzano... or Dolin Rouge for that matter. And I really, really hate Noilly Prat.

There's an "oregano" note that I really dislike (kind of like bad faux-italian food), and Noilly Prat almost has on "olive" note that I find especially nauseating.

Also, I found all of them very "thin". They couldn't really stand up to the whiskey in a manhattan for me. 

 

But Carpano Antica, Cocchi Vermouth Di Torrino, and Contratto Rosso are all amazing.

I used to be a die-hard Antica fan, but that vanilla can be a bit much, and the Cocchi and Contratto have enough fullness without being quite as overbearing. 

Contratto may be my current favorite, but I haven't yet starting using the bottle I bought, so I haven't really played with it enough to compare.

We did a tasting and it came out tops.

 

Haha, I just bought a bottle of the Contratto based on our mutual hatred of Noilly Prat, that swimming, stale, stewed 'olive' note put me off vermouth for years! The contratto is great, I had a few glasses on ice with a kumquat twist, it has a perfect bitterness which sticks to your tongue like a negroni should, but I find it still has an oregano note which stands out IMO too strongly in the negroni, and it's very sweet. Granted the oregano note isn't 'faux-Italian' like the other vermouths but more sprightly and herbal. So I tried this in a Rob Roy (unpeated) and it worked perfectly since the afterburn of the whisky merged with the oregano turning it into something else entirely, an almost piney freshness which goes up your nose! So top marks in that area, but I'm still searching for a sweet vermouth that really allows the gin to shine in a negroni. I'll have to try the Cocchi. I find M&R lets the gin through but its thin and just not great quality compared to other vermouths. So right now I'm using Sacred Spiced English vermouth because its something which I keep around (for drinking straight), it's incredibly rich with a lot of woody depth, not too sweet. An exceptional quality drink, but like the Antica I guess, once you've put it in a Negroni it kinda "makes" the negroni due to its richness, and the other ingredients taste like more of an afterthought.

 

Also, I'm now using Sacred's Rosehip Cup instead of Campari in my Negronis. I think it was designed partly in order to replace the Campari in a Negroni, and like Campari it contains orange peel and rhubarb along with a bunch of other botanicals... I know that some view the Campari as the 'constant' in a Negroni, but I see it as a weak link in many ways, since it is hard to swap out for a 'better' Campari. Let's face it, I'm sure the original Campari was more interesting than the garish coloured drink of today. I even heard that Gran Classico is closer the original Campari, but I saw earlier in the thread that it gives a completely different flavour and viscous texture to the drink.

I find that the bitterness of the Rosehip Cup mimics that of Campari very well, it hits the 'negroni' point in the spectrum even though it isn't quite as bitter as the Campari, so perhaps a mix of the two is called for, or a more bitter vermouth. I will investigate...

 

Another thing, kumquats and physalis fruit work well along with the orange twist, their flavour is so similar it simply expands the profile of the orange - it doesn't taste like there is anything other than orange in there, just a very, very good orange!


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#198 brinza

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 12:38 PM

Yeah, I really don't enjoy M&R or Cinzano... or Dolin Rouge for that matter. And I really, really hate Noilly Prat.

There's an "oregano" note that I really dislike (kind of like bad faux-italian food), and Noilly Prat almost has on "olive" note that I find especially nauseating.

Also, I found all of them very "thin". They couldn't really stand up to the whiskey in a manhattan for me. 

 

But Carpano Antica, Cocchi Vermouth Di Torrino, and Contratto Rosso are all amazing.

Interesting that you made the comment about oregano, because I definitely get that with M&R, slightly with Dolin, and especially with Vya, but I don't taste that at all in Cinzano, which is actually my favorite everyday vermouth.  I agree with you on Noilly Prat rouge.  I've only had one bottle (a 375ml) and didn't care for it at all.    I'd use Cocchi Vermouth di Torino more often if I could get it easily.  I might have to try the Contratto before PA decides it's too good for us to have.


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#199 Kerry Beal

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 05:03 PM

Dittany of Crete - aka Origanum dictumus is a common vermouth herb - and often one of the predominate ones.  Bet that is where your oregano flavour comes in.



#200 EvergreenDan

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 10:07 AM

I made a white-ish Negroni last night with equal parts Redemption white rye, Breckenridge Bitters, and dry vermouth. Not earth shattering, but a nice variation. My wife sniffed and made "that" face, so I made her's with white rye, Campari, and Punt e Mes. She said, "yum."


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#201 Czequershuus

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 06:43 AM

I made a white-ish Negroni last night with equal parts Redemption white rye, Breckenridge Bitters, and dry vermouth. Not earth shattering, but a nice variation. My wife sniffed and made "that" face, so I made her's with white rye, Campari, and Punt e Mes. She said, "yum."

 

Dan, what do you think of Breckenridge Bitters? I purchased a bottle about 6 months ago and find it a bit difficult to work with. I love i with soda, or in a sort of Americano variation, but I have had trouble subbing it in for Campari in general. I am curious to know you perspective.



#202 EvergreenDan

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 07:05 AM

Dan, what do you think of Breckenridge Bitters? I purchased a bottle about 6 months ago and find it a bit difficult to work with. I love i with soda, or in a sort of Americano variation, but I have had trouble subbing it in for Campari in general. I am curious to know you perspective.

 

I agree. It's much closer to Suze than Campari, so that's where I'd look for inspiration. I wonder if people would contribute if we created a large number of separate "Hard to mix with" ingredient threads. With the amaro explosion of late, I have lots of bottles that needs some recipe development.


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#203 Rafa

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 07:18 AM

Why not one catch-all thread? 


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#204 Czequershuus

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 10:12 AM

I agree. It's much closer to Suze than Campari, so that's where I'd look for inspiration. I wonder if people would contribute if we created a large number of separate "Hard to mix with" ingredient threads. With the amaro explosion of late, I have lots of bottles that needs some recipe development.

 

That is good to know. I have had no experience with Suze, so I will look for recipes to try out or modify. 

 

I support the idea for hard to mix with stuff. I have a great, super bitter bottle of Pelinkovac that I can only find about half a dozen recipes for online. Might be worth people sharing their creations with theese ingredients. 



#205 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 10:10 AM

The Ortensia with equal parts Highland Park 12, Punt e Mes, Aperol, and a (bitter) orange twist. A Negroni with scotch... and it was really good. Because Aperol is not as bitter as Campari, I think it's important to use Punt e Mes rather than any sweet vermouth in this drink.

 

14125646586_4646ecd544_z.jpg

 

In other news, Negroni week is only a few weeks away with a lot of bars participating this year.
 



#206 mhdousa

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 05:04 PM

Negroni week is coming up. Not that we need a special reason to celebrate this fine creation, but it's a chance to hear about some variations on the drink.  I've had, and love, the Boulevardier and 1794.  

 

What are some other favorite spins on the negroni?

 



#207 janeer

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 09:14 PM

Seriously, there's such a thing as Negroni Week?? Probably should not have told me...
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#208 SamChevre

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 06:33 AM

The earlier thread is great for what gin, what proportions, and so on.  If you are going further afield, and looking for "vermouth, campari, liquor" drinks like the Boulevardier, my favorite is a very fancy Boulevardier.

 

2 oz Elijah Craig 12 bourbon

1 oz Campari

1 oz Cinzano sweet vermouth

Stir, strain.  Float 1 barspoon Smith and Cross, flame an nice big orange peel.  

 

(This a cheap knock-off of Chuck Taggart's Boulevard Des Reves; other variations are at the link.

 

I also suggest trying Luxardo Bitter, if you can find it, as a sub for the Campari; it's very similar but slightly cleaner on the finish (like the difference between US and Mexican coke.)


Edited by SamChevre, 30 May 2014 - 06:37 AM.


#209 weinoo

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Posted 04 June 2014 - 06:31 AM

Wouldn't you know it?  It's Negroni Week!


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#210 brinza

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 09:22 AM

On a whim, I decided to throw caution to the wind (the three sheets notwithstanding), and shake  :shock:  my negroni.  I always build my Negroni in the glass.  I think I've stirred it on one or two occasions, but I wanted to see what shaking it would do.  The color was completely different.  I should have taken a photo, but it's easy enough for anyone to replicate.  The taste was actually a little different due to the aeration and immediate dilution.  It was still good and very refreshing, though.  I didn't use anything unusual it--the gin was Bombay Dry and the vermouth was Cinzano.  I will more than likely stick with building it, but it was an interesting experiment and still resulted in a pleasant drink.  I'm thinking that this style might be better suited for outdoor use.


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