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The Hot Sauce Topic

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#211 Butterbean

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 04:31 PM

Found this thread very interesting. Its nice to know others are intrigued by the hot side. I must confess however that I was a little depressed when I saw Sashae's photo of the bottle of Scorned Woman as I recently created a sauce I dubbed A Woman's Scorn. So much for the idea of wealth and riches.

While I won't give the recipe, here is a photo of some of the ingredients.

Posted Image


The end product.

Posted Image


A short description of the flavor profile.

As many a poor man has learned the initial fragrance of a woman is quite alluring, the initial contact is sweet as honey but then .... the unlucky soul learns of a hidden wrath. A wrath that is wielded with such utter vengenence one wonders where all this fury came from. One questions, what happened to the sweetness as all parts of the mouth burn as if you've swallowed a hot coal. Just as the unfortunate one had grown attached to her sweetnes, its snatched away without warning leaving one with uncontrollable sniffles and tears running down the face. Finally, the burning in the roof of the mouth subsides as the nasal drainage and tears increase. Finally, the scalding fire in the sides of your cheeks subside leaving just a small flame on the tip of your tongue which you uncontrollably press against your teeth making you look like a dog whose eaten a stink bug. Then there is a slight burning sensation in the pit of your gut and the drainage and tears cease as you realize - its over - she has gone and the endorphins in your body subside leaving those with short memories wanting more as if the next time is going to be any different. Brilliant stuff this is!!!!


Edited by Butterbean, 20 August 2012 - 04:36 PM.


#212 Peter the eater

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 07:14 PM

While I won't give the recipe, here is a photo of some of the ingredients.

Posted Image

I respect your recipe secrecy. I see habs, bonnets, jalapenos, fingers, 3 big bowls, garlic, green herbs of some kind and 2 mysterious piles of tiny peppers.

My garden has exploded with peppers and I'm in hot sauce production mode. We got a bunch of Bhut Jolokias this year which are off the charts heatwise.
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I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .
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#213 Mjx

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 10:59 PM

. . . . I must confess however that I was a little depressed when I saw Sashae's photo of the bottle of Scorned Woman as I recently created a sauce I dubbed A Woman's Scorn. So much for the idea of wealth and riches.

. . . .


No need to be even a little depressed, since a woman's scorn is an entirely different thing than a woman scorned... I'm guessing that yours must contain some element that leaves behind it at least a trace of shame or humiliation, at least as an after-effect (from screaming in pain..?) :wink:

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#214 Butterbean

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 05:05 AM

I think you are right on both statements. Nothing like a woman's input for clarity. Maybe there is still hope for my wealth and riches pipe dream. :raz:

I do enjoy messing with peppers and making sauces is really quite interesting. Peter, there is nothing like making your own sauce is there?

#215 toolprincess

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 10:26 AM

How do you store your hot sauces? I keep my sriracha in the fridge but everything else (El yucateo, Tabasco, Texas Pete, Cholula) - I just keep in the cabinet.

#216 Butterbean

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 01:06 PM

I haven't really worried about storing them for any length of time as I'm more interested in experimenting with different combinations so I just keep them in the cooler unless its a heavy vinegar based sauce that I know will keep on the shelf.. If I hit on a good one I'll look further into how well they will keep. The Woman's Scorn is getting close. :biggrin:

#217 Peter the eater

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 06:19 PM

I make fairly small batches of hot sauce for fun and sharing. Extra sauce gets frozen in plastic, which I believe can make it hotter. I don't know if there's any science to explain this observation.
Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .
Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .
Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

#218 Chef Joel

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 10:48 PM

The two greatest bottle hot sauces in the world are Yucateco Green (glows in the dark, and has a half-life), and Infinity Chile Sauce (right below Police-Grade Pepper Spray on the Schofield Heat Index). The #3 spot goes to McIllhenny's, hands-down. IMHO.....

#219 daydayxvi

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 05:04 PM

For me the best hot sauce so far has been Marie Sharp's Habanero Sauce. We discovered it during our honeymoon in Peten and have loved it ever since.
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#220 patrickamory

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 04:22 PM

Love Marie Sharp's! There's a hot and a mild version, based on carrots, both excellent. It's from Belize.

#221 radtek

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 05:31 PM

OK guys...

Love Sriacha. Discovered it eating at Vietnamese restaurants and didn't figure out that it was made in California until years later- guess I should have read the bottle. Was definitely used to paint the plates at many a fine dining establishment. Heard it referred to as "Sir Hatchy" or "Chinese Ketchup"! lol

I think Tabasco is the benchmark for all around depth of flavor despite it ain't being that hot to me any more. Brings a lot to the party though.

So instead of buying these other folks' expensive hot sauce only a few are trying to make their own (based on the thread's replies)? Let me help you...

I take a pound of peppers- your choice. You want to use Carolina Reaper go for it. My last was a mix of serranos and habaneros. De-stem and toss into a blender with about 3% kosher salt by weight. Add at 2 cups of tap water and start to blend it up until you get a fine slurry. Run that blender. Get it as fine as you can!

Then pour it into a sanitized jar- a mason jar preferably. Let the mixture sit covered in a cool dark place for at least 30 days stirring periodically. You don't have to stir it but may then have to scrape/ lift some mold off later- don't worry, this has no impact in the final product.

Once in the jar fermentation will rapidly begin. Let it ferment and stir the slurry to incorporate. Let the sauce do it's thing. Fermentation happens.

After at least 30 days decant into a blender with 2 cups of vinegar and blend for a minimum of 5 minutes. Strain into another jar through cheesecloth. I like to fill old Tabasco bottles from this.

Congratulations. This is the real thing.

#222 Czequershuus

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 10:19 PM

Like everyone else in this thread I am a huge Sriracha fan. Goes great on so many dishes, plus it is great for spicing up any non-spicy condiment. Sriracha and ketchup... bam, spicy ketchup. Work great with mustard, barbecue sauces, and of course the classic combo with mayo.

My favorite dasher sauce is Yucatan Sunshine - enough heat to give it a kick, but not to overwhelm whatever the food is. Pizza, pasta, soup, chili, ect.

I've had many others, including a few bottles of stuff only suitable for adding in drops to a pot of chili, or in a single dot on a Taco, Including Dave's Insanity, Black Widow, and one whose name is the marvelously juvenile Super Colon Blow. Mainly I accumulate these as gifts from people who know I like hot sauce.

I also like to have Kick Ass Jalapeno sauce, not very spicy, but makes a great midnight snake with soda crackers.

And Finally, there is my favorite and seemingly discontinued sauce, Baboon Ass hot sauce. Silly name, but one of the richest flavors I have ever encountered.

#223 patrickamory

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 10:30 PM

I miss Inner Beauty... :sad:

#224 Ashen

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 12:22 AM

You can make your own if you want.. A video of chris schlesinger showing you how




My current favourite is Green Scotch Bonnet Hot Pepper Sauce closely followed by Grace scotch bonnet sauce which has a yellow/orange colour to the sauce. Clean flavour with a great kick of heat and the best part is they are some of the most widely available and inexpensive ones at local grocery stores.
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#225 Syzygies

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 12:27 AM

2009hotsauce.jpg

For many years, Ortego hot sauce, made in small batches in Ville Platte, was the best Louisiana-style hot sauce. We used to order it by the case, straight from the maker.

When he retired, I started fermenting small batches aspiring to a similar style. Buy the best local chiles in the tabasco style at a farmers market, ferment them in a beer carboy or a fermentation crock as one would make sauerkraut, and grind in a Vita-Prep with a good mild vinegar such as champagne or rice wine vinegar. Adjust the salt, sieve and bottle. We still miss Ortego but this gets my friends by.
Per la strada incontro un passero che disse "Fratello cane, perche sei cosi triste?"
Ripose il cane: "Ho fame e non ho nulla da mangiare."

#226 Shelby

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 08:31 AM

2009hotsauce.jpg

For many years, Ortego hot sauce, made in small batches in Ville Platte, was the best Louisiana-style hot sauce. We used to order it by the case, straight from the maker.

When he retired, I started fermenting small batches aspiring to a similar style. Buy the best local chiles in the tabasco style at a farmers market, ferment them in a beer carboy or a fermentation crock as one would make sauerkraut, and grind in a Vita-Prep with a good mild vinegar such as champagne or rice wine vinegar. Adjust the salt, sieve and bottle. We still miss Ortego but this gets my friends by.

Beautiful looking sauce! May I ask where you purchase your bottles?

#227 pacman1978

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 09:25 AM

Encona is a great hot sauce for me - has a real kick but not too much. It is west indian in origin, Idon't know if you can easliy get it in the US though but really common here in the UK

#228 Syzygies

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 10:47 AM

Woozy-2012-Red.jpg

May I ask where you purchase your bottles?

Freund Container & Supply.

5 oz "Woozy" bottle + reducer + shrink band + cap = 0.61 + 0.07 + 0.02 + 0.10 = 80 cents/bottle, with price breaks for quantity purchases. Laser printer address labels (full or half sheet) cut up and stick nicely.

http://www.freundcon...les/p/V5014B36/
http://www.freundcon....aspx?p=6046-wb
http://www.freundcon...spx?p=sbc241-wb
http://www.freundcon...px?p=x24-414-wb
Per la strada incontro un passero che disse "Fratello cane, perche sei cosi triste?"
Ripose il cane: "Ho fame e non ho nulla da mangiare."

#229 Raamo

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 01:32 PM

We grow two peppers - Fatalii and Rocoto I'd love to make a sauce out of the Fatalii if I got enough of them. I'm in Minnnesota so it's strickly an indoor project. There's one fatalii on one of the plants right now but I doubt I'd ever get a full pound.

What's the reason for fermenting described above?

#230 Syzygies

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 05:57 PM

Fatali.jpg

The Fatalii is a chili pepper of Capsicum chinense that originates in central and southern Africa. It is described to have a fruity, citrus flavor with a searing heat that is comparable to the standard habanero. The Scoville Food Institute lists the Fatalii as the seventh hottest pepper, ranging 125,000–325,000 Scoville units. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fatalii


We grow two peppers - Fatalii and Rocoto I'd love to make a sauce out of the Fatali

As it happens, we make two hot sauces, both because we can't buy them: A "Tabasco" style fermented red hot sauce, and a Caribbean style hot sauce from Fatali peppers.

I'd be making something up if I provided a "reason" for fermenting the red hot sauce. I tried making hot sauce without fermenting, and it was bad. Pathetic. I even found similar recipes online by famous authors, and I was embarrassed to read them. As in, the hot sauce was "gee whiz lets make a nuclear accelerator in our backyard using Q-tips" bad. So I read up on the original McIlhenny recipe (no matter that I find the modern commercial version lacking) involving packing in oak barrels for years, carving off the black bits that looked like they'd kill you (I paraphrase) and mixing with vinegar. The acidic fermentation process used to make sauerkraut and kimchi struck me as quicker and more controllable (like modern wine making in stainless steel tanks) so I went for it. The http://morebeer.com warehouse was in my town so I used beer carboys; I've since switched to German fermentation crocks. The results were much, much better, with fermentation. No reason. Rather, an empirical observation.

While I wouldn't call this approach widespread, I would call it obvious (I'm a mathematician and we have a pretty harsh notion of originality; this was an exercise) and I've since seen similar approaches described on fermentation forums. If you want to sound like a troll, go express concern about botulism on one of those forums. They're pretty confident that proper fermentation technique can't possibly lead to botulism. I bought a pH meter, and acidify at the start to a level that can't support botulism. The fermentation bugs don't mind, and they take it from there.

On the other hand, fatali peppers make an astonishing cooked sauce, with little trouble. This sauce is the all-time favorite of various friends, and we grow fatali peppers regularly just for this sauce. A quarter teaspoon can be just the tweak to bring a tomato pasta sauce to life. Or slather it on a sandwich, if your tolerances are higher:

24 Fatali peppers, chopped
1 cup chopped onion
4 cloves garlic
2 TB oil
1 cup chopped carrots
1 cup vinegar (rice, champagne or white)
1/2 cup lime juice


Saute garlic and onions in oil, add carrots and a bit of water, simmer till soft. Grind to puree with chopped peppers, combine with vinegar and lime juice, simmer 5 minutes.

Edited by Syzygies, 08 January 2013 - 06:03 PM.

Per la strada incontro un passero che disse "Fratello cane, perche sei cosi triste?"
Ripose il cane: "Ho fame e non ho nulla da mangiare."

#231 Hassouni

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 07:25 PM

Used to be a big Sriracha fan, but now I find it too sweet and garlicky. I still use it, but not as a universal spicer-upper. My favorites are the Yucateco Kutbil-Ik "Exxxtra" hot Habanero salsa (I initially picked this cos it has no artificial colors, but GOD DAMN is it good), and Busha Browne's Pukka hot sauce (http://www.bushabrow...a_hot_sauce.php), made from Scotch Bonnets - but I've only seen that in London. Lately I've taken to just adding chopped habanero to my dish when I went a clean hit of heat without any additional flavor like vinegar or sugar.

#232 Raamo

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 07:27 AM

On the other hand, fatali peppers make an astonishing cooked sauce, with little trouble. This sauce is the all-time favorite of various friends, and we grow fatali peppers regularly just for this sauce. A quarter teaspoon can be just the tweak to bring a tomato pasta sauce to life. Or slather it on a sandwich, if your tolerances are higher:

24 Fatali peppers, chopped
1 cup chopped onion
4 cloves garlic
2 TB oil
1 cup chopped carrots
1 cup vinegar (rice, champagne or white)
1/2 cup lime juice


Saute garlic and onions in oil, add carrots and a bit of water, simmer till soft. Grind to puree with chopped peppers, combine with vinegar and lime juice, simmer 5 minutes.


Awesome, someone else who actually grows Fatali's - how many plants do you have? Getting to 24 to make this would be rather difficult so I may have to pair this recipe down when we get a crop. The pepper is so hot but awesome we havn't exactly worried about the low production. I'm in Minnesota so it's only 65 in the room with the peppers much of the time during the winter and I'm sure they don't like that - but there's one pepper on one of the plants right now!

Back when I first got into Fatali it was the 5th hottest pepper.. how times change :) We mostly use it in Fajitas but my wife makes me cook them on the grill because the oil gets so hot it's basically a pepper oil gas in the kitchen. The flavor imparted by the pepers has made resturant Fajita's blah to me and I don't order them any more. I have put them in Chili before and gotten crazy hot chili but it seems to lack some of the double punch you get when the chilis aren't cooked quite as much.

#233 chileheadmike

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 08:54 AM

I used to grow fatalii's every year in Kansas City. They were very prolific, and super hot. I dried them and then powered them. That sure cleared the room.

I ordered them from chileplants.com.
That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

#234 Raamo

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 09:13 AM

We get the Fatali's from Seed Savers out of Iowa, getting them to grow isn't a problem :) We've never tried to get them to produce a lot of peppers which we'll want to do if we're going to make a sauce out of multiple.

#235 Syzygies

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 08:32 AM

We most recently bought Fatali (and other) plants from http://thechilewoman.com. We need the jump on starting from seed, to squeeze in a decent growing season. A couple plants outdoors will provide many dozens of peppers in a good year.

I discovered fatali by chance, asking a plant guy about peppers at a local farmers market. He pulled out a couple of plants tucked away in back, his personal favorites, and gave me a warning/recommendation. It felt like the beginning of a Stephen King horror movie, "oh cute furry creatures, let's bring you home!" Never saw the guy again. That was our best pepper growing season ever, starting with a very hot June, and the plants went crazy.

Fatali.jpg

From some peppers we'd saved frozen. Next time I'd freeze part way through the recipe, ground in vinegar. And the recipe needs salt to taste.

Edited by Syzygies, 13 January 2013 - 08:39 AM.

Per la strada incontro un passero che disse "Fratello cane, perche sei cosi triste?"
Ripose il cane: "Ho fame e non ho nulla da mangiare."

#236 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 09:30 AM

Looks real good, Syzygies.
Fatalis are great!



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#237 Jaymes

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 10:22 AM

Just have to put in a plug for my latest personal hot sauce obsession. Felicidad Chipotle Salsa from Rancho Gordo.

Here's a link to a review on "Hot Sauce Blog": http://www.hotsauceb...alsa-hot-sauce/

I love this stuff. It's hot, but not so hot that people that can't handle spicy food can't enjoy it. Because it's a chipotle sauce, it's particularly valuable to me because I make a great many dishes that call for chipotle and, pre-Felicidad, I'd throw a can of chipotle into the blender, wind up with about a half-cup of chipotle, use 1 or 2 tablespoons, then put the rest into a little plastic bag and then into the freezer to use another time. Of course, I'd forget it was there and, next time I needed chipotle, I'd repeat the same procedure. The result was lots of little baggies of chipotle in the freezer that I never got around to using.

But now, a few shakes of Felicidad, and I, too, am felicidad!

It's available on several gourmet food websites, but here's a link where you can order it directly from Rancho Gordo: http://www.ranchogor...e=#.UPLsgazJLLE

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#238 Raamo

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Posted 13 January 2013 - 12:58 PM

I discovered fatali by chance, asking a plant guy about peppers at a local farmers market. He pulled out a couple of plants tucked away in back, his personal favorites, and gave me a warning/recommendation. It felt like the beginning of a Stephen King horror movie, "oh cute furry creatures, let's bring you home!" Never saw the guy again. That was our best pepper growing season ever, starting with a very hot June, and the plants went crazy.


That's a great story, I discovered them in the seed savers catalog listed as super hot and decided to give them a try, I still have the first plat we started. We're going to try starting a bunch from seeds this spring and growing them outside, should be able to get plenty of peppers and make enough sauce to last a while. Going to use the one I have right now in the buffalo sauce from MC@H this afternoon just to see how it works out :)

#239 phatj

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 04:56 PM

I got a bottle of Native Treasure Blazing Inferno Island Pepper Sauce in Barbados a few weeks ago. It's made with Scotch bonnets. Seriously spicy, at least for my taste, but with a really nice, sweet, citrusy flavor under the heat. I like it a lot.

#240 Raamo

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 07:32 AM

I got a bottle of Native Treasure Blazing Inferno Island Pepper Sauce in Barbados a few weeks ago. It's made with Scotch bonnets. Seriously spicy, at least for my taste, but with a really nice, sweet, citrusy flavor under the heat. I like it a lot.


Does it have an ingredient label? Or are scotch bonnets known to be citrusy? The few times I've made stuff with the SBs I don't recall much citrus.





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