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Chocolates with that showroom finish, 2004 - 2011

Confections Chocolate

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#511 Lior

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Posted 29 April 2010 - 09:22 PM

Kouign Aman-thank you very much!! I had fun doing it. I will continue my experiments! Have a great day (at least it is the beginning of a new day by me...)!! :laugh:

#512 Chris Hennes

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Posted 20 May 2010 - 11:00 AM

After this year's eGullet Candy and Confectionery Conference/Workshop I got up the motivation to give molded chocolates another go, and finally achieved success. It seems that my issue with the temper being off was basically entirely due to latent heat of crystallization, which (after some considerable guidance from Steve and company at the workshop) I have finally gotten under control. For me, the critical missing step turned out to be putting the mold in the refrigerator for 10-15 minutes once it got its final scrape-down. My guess is this is happening to me because I am working with the chocolate at the very upper end of its working range: does that make sense? If I dropped down a couple degrees from that, do you think that the issue would go away entirely? I don't have a good handle on how much heat gets released as the chocolate crystallizes.

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#513 lebowits

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Posted 20 May 2010 - 12:34 PM

After this year's eGullet Candy and Confectionery Conference/Workshop I got up the motivation to give molded chocolates another go, and finally achieved success. It seems that my issue with the temper being off was basically entirely due to latent heat of crystallization, which (after some considerable guidance from Steve and company at the workshop) I have finally gotten under control. For me, the critical missing step turned out to be putting the mold in the refrigerator for 10-15 minutes once it got its final scrape-down. My guess is this is happening to me because I am working with the chocolate at the very upper end of its working range: does that make sense? If I dropped down a couple degrees from that, do you think that the issue would go away entirely? I don't have a good handle on how much heat gets released as the chocolate crystallizes.


I routinely "bump" my chocolate up near the top of it's working temp range, especially with milk chocolate which tends (for me at least) to be the most viscous.

After I cast my shells, I place the molds on their sides for a few minutes to let the chocolate begin to crystallize. Placing them on their sides, allows the latent heat of crystallization to dissipate from both the face and back of the mold. Once the chocolate has lost it's "gloss", I place the molds in the refrigerator for about 10 minutes to fully set the chocolate before filling.

After the centers have crystallized enough to "foot" the pieces without "heaving", I put on the foot, and place the molds in the refrigerator for about an hour. This assures that all of the chocolate is well on into crystallization and pretty much guarantees that the shells separate from the cavities. After removing the molds from the refrigerator, I let them come up to room temp for an hour or so before un-molding. Letting them warm up before popping them out alleviates any worries about condensation forming on them.
Steve Lebowitz
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Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

#514 mostlylana

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Posted 20 May 2010 - 11:27 PM

Sounds like a good process you've got Steve. That darn latent heat has gotten me a few times - with 100g. bars and my hollow Easter bunnies. I don't really understand how the big boys do it with their spinning machines... My bunny molds don't have any openings. I measure in a certain amount of chocolate and click the 2 sides together and become the human spinning machine. Unless I do this in a cold room, I'm hooped. Milk and white chocolates are fine but dark will go out of temper. After 3-4 minutes of 'spinning' the molds go into the fridge with a fan. This is the only way I can get good results with dark bunnies. The bars aren't as bad but they also are fussy. But back to the big boys with their spinning machines... I've seen them in different professional kitchens and they are in the main working room. How does the latent heat not affect their products?!

#515 lebowits

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Posted 21 May 2010 - 02:49 AM

Sounds like a good process you've got Steve. That darn latent heat has gotten me a few times - with 100g. bars and my hollow Easter bunnies. I don't really understand how the big boys do it with their spinning machines... My bunny molds don't have any openings. I measure in a certain amount of chocolate and click the 2 sides together and become the human spinning machine. Unless I do this in a cold room, I'm hooped. Milk and white chocolates are fine but dark will go out of temper. After 3-4 minutes of 'spinning' the molds go into the fridge with a fan. This is the only way I can get good results with dark bunnies. The bars aren't as bad but they also are fussy. But back to the big boys with their spinning machines... I've seen them in different professional kitchens and they are in the main working room. How does the latent heat not affect their products?!


I haven't done any 3D molds myself, but the couple of full-on chocolate kitchens I've worked in are always kept rather cool.
Steve Lebowitz
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Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

#516 Sebastian

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Posted 21 May 2010 - 03:18 AM

But back to the big boys with their spinning machines... I've seen them in different professional kitchens and they are in the main working room. How does the latent heat not affect their products?!



It can. Crucial things are:
1) mould design - some moulds and materials are far worse than others w/ regards to heat transfer (or trapping...)
2) cooling - both temperature and airflow are critical. the 'big boys' as you put it have a very good understanding of how to optimize their process conditions to be just right.
3) time - heat transfer is about materials, temperature, and time. just as colder temperatures aren't necessarily better (ie finding the right temp), there's a right time factor to identify as well
4) chocolate thickness is also quite important, especially for 3D moulds. solid moulding large objects is by far the most difficult. usually done in layers.

#517 Lior

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Posted 21 May 2010 - 04:31 AM

This is odd. I hear from many that they put their molds in the fridge. I hardly hardly ever do this. I have the air on at 20 to begin with then after I make the mold shells I right away lower it to 17C. I also have a small dehumidifier always going 24/7. The trolley with the molds is a bit closer to the air cond unit than where I work. I usually do not have any problems. Do you believe the fridge step is a must? Mine are shiny but perhaps they can be even shinier? Does anyone else skip the fridge?

#518 Kerry Beal

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Posted 21 May 2010 - 04:33 AM

I use the two fridge steps in my kitchen - I don't have any other cool spot in my kitchen. But I don't use it for dipped objects - just molded.

#519 Lior

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Posted 21 May 2010 - 05:15 AM

Hi Kerry! What is the 2 step? At both stages of making molded bonbons? Do you have air cond-what is the ambient temp of where you work?

I am always concerned about the humidity inside the fridge. I am looking into a mini dehumidifier fo the fridge I have. I have altered the thermostat but then humidity is a worry.
Thanks

#520 Kerry Beal

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Posted 21 May 2010 - 05:20 AM

Hi Kerry! What is the 2 step? At both stages of making molded bonbons? Do you have air cond-what is the ambient temp of where you work?

I am always concerned about the humidity inside the fridge. I am looking into a mini dehumidifier fo the fridge I have. I have altered the thermostat but then humidity is a worry.
Thanks

Yup - put them in after making the shell for about 10 minutes, then after backing off for another 10 ti 15 - until I can see they have mostly separated. They aren't in there long enough for humidity to be an issue.

Room temp around 22 to 24.

#521 Lior

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Posted 21 May 2010 - 06:16 AM

Well maybe I should try this and see if it makes a diff. Have you tried not using the fridge ever? I guess 22-24 is a bit high without a fridge. Thanks Kerry.

#522 mostlylana

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Posted 21 May 2010 - 09:44 AM

When I do shell moulding I don't usually use the fridge either. As Steve said, put the moulds on their side for air flow and that is usually OK if your room is cool. However I do use the fridge once they're capped. Just be sure to leave them in the mould for at least an hour once they're out of the fridge to avoid any condensation.

3D molding and thick bar molding is a different story. The 3D molds I use don't have any opening so can really hold the heat. Not only do I have to use the fridge but the fridge with a fan in it!

Sebastian, I think one of your points is right on for me. I make my bunnies hollow but I like the walls to be thick. I have noticed if I make them thinner the result is much better. You also mentioned mould design. I think that's a factor too. The areas that are out of temper are always in the crease where the head and body attach (and, of course, on the inside of the bunny).

I was in Paul DeBondt's kitchen and watched him make one of his amazing eggs. He put it on the spinner for 10 - 15 minutes if I recall and then it went into the fridge. His room temp. wasn't noticeably cool. His egg was fabulous! We didn't open up the egg so don't really know how thick the walls were...

#523 pastrygirl

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Posted 27 July 2010 - 05:39 PM

NOT that showroom finish:IMG_0441.JPG

Orange cocoa butter painted in, white chocolate finger-swirled then molded in dark chocolate (filled with Greweling's white chocolate passion fruit ganache). I did four molds this way and a significant number of pieces have places where the orange stuck to the mold, as with the bottom piece in the picture. I had the same issue with some chocolates I had made around New Years: IMG_0194.JPG

Clearly I am doing something wrong. Is the white chocolate not warm enough to adhere to the cocoa butter properly? Am I just out of temper somewhere? The ones today were in new molds, so the molds should not have been dirty. I am sure I have done a combo like this successfully before. Hmmm :sad:

#524 Kerry Beal

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Posted 27 July 2010 - 05:42 PM

Clearly I am doing something wrong. Is the white chocolate not warm enough to adhere to the cocoa butter properly? Am I just out of temper somewhere? The ones today were in new molds, so the molds should not have been dirty. I am sure I have done a combo like this successfully before. Hmmm :sad:

Might be the white chocolate isn't warm enough. Also new molds often don't work as well until they build up a layer of cocoa butter.

But it's a really neat look!

Edited by Kerry Beal, 27 July 2010 - 05:42 PM.


#525 pastrygirl

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Posted 27 July 2010 - 08:53 PM

Might be the white chocolate isn't warm enough. Also new molds often don't work as well until they build up a layer of cocoa butter.

But it's a really neat look!


Molds can be too clean?? :blink: Ya learn sump'in every day....

#526 RobertM

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 06:11 AM

Could it be that the colored cocoa butter wasn't in temper? I've been told that colored cocoa butter will stick to molds if it's not in temper...

#527 RichardJones

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Posted 28 July 2010 - 08:04 AM

It might be a temper issue and it might be that your white chocolate was not warm enough. Another possibility, inversely, is that the cocoa butter was too cold. Once your tempered CB has crystalized why not try warming it slightly with a heat gun or hairdryer to bring it up in temperature slightly. I used to have the problem you describe but have not since using this idea. Of course, need to be careful not to take it too hot. If you try it, let us know if it works for you!

R
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#528 lebowits

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 05:31 AM

It's also possible that the colored CB was too thick in some areas.
Steve Lebowitz
Doer of All Things
Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

#529 prairiegirl

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Posted 02 August 2010 - 03:58 PM

Looks like the cocoa butter is out of temper.

#530 prairiegirl

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 12:29 PM

I just did a batch of black and maroon coloured swirls for a wedding chocolate. My coloured cocoa butters have been sitting at the shop where the temperatures can get quite high due to the pastry chef's baking and summer weather. Long story short, the colourts are out of temper. When I demoulded the bonbons there was quite a bit of chipping. I had to retemper the whole bottle of black and the maroon. The next batch was beautiful.
I tempered the colours to 29 Celsius. So I can definitely and confidently say that your cocoa butter is out of temper!

Edited by prairiegirl, 08 August 2010 - 12:31 PM.


#531 mostlylana

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 01:34 PM

So now that you've retempered your colours - what is your system? Let's say you are going to use those colours again today. Do you scrape out a little or do you heat the whole bottle? How do you heat it so as to 'keep it in temper'? And doesn't the air from the airbrush require that you have the temp. slightly higher as the air cools it further as you spray?

#532 Edward J

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 09:02 PM

My head is hurting from reading all 18 pages Plus the othe airbrush thread, but I'm not finding any information pertaining to compressors.

A couple of weeks ago, I passed a garage sale and picked up a Badger 350 with a few extra tips--all apparantly new, but no air source--for 5 bucks. Reading through the thread, I understand canned air is a bad idea--nasty chemicals and a tendancy to freeze up.

Today my daughter dragged me to Micheal's (bitten hard by the beading and jewlery making bug) and I looked at their airbrush stuff. They had one compressor there, badger recomended, Cyclone something, with a max output of 40 psi and I think a cfm of 20 (or is it two hundred?) for the princley sum of $349 CDN. However, they do have a 40% discount running, which would bring the price down to aprox $210 CDN.

1) Is this a reasonable sum?
2) Will the compressor perform as needed for chocolate work?
3)How loud is this thing? I have a "Chef rubber special" table top vibrator at work, is it louder than this?
4) Assuming I use it for an hour a day, what kind of life can I get out of it?
4)Not wanting to plug up my lungs or sneeze in technicolour, what type of mask should I be using? The cheapie fabric ones with the metal nosepiece avaiable at hardware stores?

5)Anyone use a Badger 350, or should I just bite the bullet and get the 100?

Streamlining......
I currently use four colours at work: Red, green, blue, yellow, and orange. As I've never used an airbrush yet, these are brushed on or a "mouth atomizer" is used. I mix my own colours, some are from PCB, some from a Dutch Co. (Attended a Callebaut thingee where Derrick was featured, he said to dissolve the colour into hot c.b, stir well, cool until solid, melt again, stir well, and you're good to go. Good advice)

a)Is it practical to buy four 1/4 oz bottles (one for each colour) for the badger and keep these in a warm place (top oven, never used)?

b)Does the brush need to be cleaned out between colours, or just spray out the old colour until a clean new colour appears?

Thanks,
Edward

#533 pringle007

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Posted 09 August 2010 - 11:29 AM

My head is hurting from reading all 18 pages Plus the othe airbrush thread, but I'm not finding any information pertaining to compressors.

A couple of weeks ago, I passed a garage sale and picked up a Badger 350 with a few extra tips--all apparantly new, but no air source--for 5 bucks. Reading through the thread, I understand canned air is a bad idea--nasty chemicals and a tendancy to freeze up.

Today my daughter dragged me to Micheal's (bitten hard by the beading and jewlery making bug) and I looked at their airbrush stuff. They had one compressor there, badger recomended, Cyclone something, with a max output of 40 psi and I think a cfm of 20 (or is it two hundred?) for the princley sum of $349 CDN. However, they do have a 40% discount running, which would bring the price down to aprox $210 CDN.

1) Is this a reasonable sum?
2) Will the compressor perform as needed for chocolate work?
3)How loud is this thing? I have a "Chef rubber special" table top vibrator at work, is it louder than this?
4) Assuming I use it for an hour a day, what kind of life can I get out of it?
4)Not wanting to plug up my lungs or sneeze in technicolour, what type of mask should I be using? The cheapie fabric ones with the metal nosepiece avaiable at hardware stores?

5)Anyone use a Badger 350, or should I just bite the bullet and get the 100?

Streamlining......
I currently use four colours at work: Red, green, blue, yellow, and orange. As I've never used an airbrush yet, these are brushed on or a "mouth atomizer" is used. I mix my own colours, some are from PCB, some from a Dutch Co. (Attended a Callebaut thingee where Derrick was featured, he said to dissolve the colour into hot c.b, stir well, cool until solid, melt again, stir well, and you're good to go. Good advice)

a)Is it practical to buy four 1/4 oz bottles (one for each colour) for the badger and keep these in a warm place (top oven, never used)?

b)Does the brush need to be cleaned out between colours, or just spray out the old colour until a clean new colour appears?

Thanks,
Edward


If you have a Harbor Freight nearby, they sell compressors that fit the badger for about $65 USA. They also have several airbrush kits in the range of $10-35
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#534 Edward J

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Posted 09 August 2010 - 12:42 PM

Thanks, No, no Harbour Freight here in CDN but I will look them up.

My concerns regarding a compressor are if it is reliable (has anyone used this type of model, and if so, comments?)and if it is made for airbrush use.

I operate with two other partners, I can and do get equipment as I need it, but I must make my decisions very carefully--if it breaks down I am S.O.L., so I'd rather pay more and sleep better at night.

#535 Chocolot

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Posted 09 August 2010 - 08:27 PM

Sure don't have all the answers, but a Callebaut Ambassador told me to just go to Home Depot and buy an oil-less compressor and put a moisture filter on it. I bought one for about $150. It puts out more air than I will ever use. The small compressors only allow you to spray one or two molds at a time. With mine, I can spray all day. I change the moisture filter when the color of the beads change. It is noisy, but I usually turn it on and walk away. When I go to use it, it is full and it rarely comes back on while I am working. I also keep ear protection within reach. I might add that I look smashing when spraying---hairnet, ear head gear, apron, gloves, and mask:-) I was prepared to buy a very expensive compressor from Chef Rubber, when I was told to do it this way. It might not be totally legal, but I have not had any problems. Harbor Freight stuff is all made in China. Some of it is better than others. Their airbrush kit is very good. $10 and you get 5 bottles and 5 lids that exchange with Badger, with a quick-change gun. Good luck.

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#536 Kerry Beal

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 04:16 AM

Thanks, No, no Harbour Freight here in CDN but I will look them up.

My concerns regarding a compressor are if it is reliable (has anyone used this type of model, and if so, comments?)and if it is made for airbrush use.

I operate with two other partners, I can and do get equipment as I need it, but I must make my decisions very carefully--if it breaks down I am S.O.L., so I'd rather pay more and sleep better at night.

Edward - I have a Campbell Hausfeld compressor I got from Canadian Tire. Had to get various adaptors for different airbrushes - but there are no limits to how low you can turn down the air. Noisy, but has a reservoir.

But my go to is an air gun - a Fuji with a turbine rather than a compressor - also noisy. But the air is warm with no moisture issues.

Also there is a Harbour Freight in Buffalo if you want something from there.

Edited by Kerry Beal, 10 August 2010 - 04:17 AM.


#537 Edward J

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 08:08 AM

Thanks for the advice, everyone.

My chocolate room is just one thin wall away from the guest's dining room in my shop, so I have to have something fairly quiet.

I don't mind spending serious coin for a serious comprssor, but I must have some kind of dependability. My partners are notoriously cheap, and if something ever breaks down it's almost impossible to get it repaired or replaced unless it is absolutely neccesary.

So I have been cruising the 'web and learning a bit about compressors. As with any other electro-mechanical device, I am highly suspicious of anything that carries only a 90 day warranty--and many of the sub $100 compressorsdo. Many more are factory refurbished. Most of the sites will list specs, and quite a few of the smaller ones are running at 80-98 decibles--waaay to loud. Oddly enough many tanning salons, nail salons, and airbrush tatoo parlours use smaller compressors.

Kerry, if I understand correctly, I need an external mix airbrush (the 350 is)and a compressor capable of max 40 psi?

On my next day off I'll be cruising some hobby shops that specialize in airbrushes, as well as tool houses. Might not make a purchase, but I don't like to buy something unless I get my grubby mitts on the item first and examine it.

#538 Kerry Beal

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 02:16 PM

Thanks for the advice, everyone.

My chocolate room is just one thin wall away from the guest's dining room in my shop, so I have to have something fairly quiet.

I don't mind spending serious coin for a serious comprssor, but I must have some kind of dependability. My partners are notoriously cheap, and if something ever breaks down it's almost impossible to get it repaired or replaced unless it is absolutely neccesary.

So I have been cruising the 'web and learning a bit about compressors. As with any other electro-mechanical device, I am highly suspicious of anything that carries only a 90 day warranty--and many of the sub $100 compressorsdo. Many more are factory refurbished. Most of the sites will list specs, and quite a few of the smaller ones are running at 80-98 decibles--waaay to loud. Oddly enough many tanning salons, nail salons, and airbrush tatoo parlours use smaller compressors.

Kerry, if I understand correctly, I need an external mix airbrush (the 350 is)and a compressor capable of max 40 psi?

On my next day off I'll be cruising some hobby shops that specialize in airbrushes, as well as tool houses. Might not make a purchase, but I don't like to buy something unless I get my grubby mitts on the item first and examine it.

Sounds about right. Are you in Toronto? You can come and see my various airbrushing things.

#539 Edward J

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 02:34 PM

No, Vancouver.

Trying to convince the partners to go East for a course or two, but alas, Callebaut isn't offering much for professionals In Montreal, and the US and Europe are too far and too expensive right now.

#540 prairiegirl

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 09:49 PM

I do a ton of airbrushing and I live in Calgary. I bought the universal 360 airbrush from the bargain basement on the Badger website. I use an air comnpressor that I bought at Michaels with a 50% coupon and paid about $130cad. I think it is the model 180 and it is all you need for airbrushing colours into a mold. You can look at my website and see what I have done using this compressor. it is noisy but not nearly as noisy as some of the bigger compressors!!

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