Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Have I ruined the Ice cream custard base?


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 thecuriousone

thecuriousone
  • participating member
  • 190 posts

Posted 23 November 2004 - 11:21 AM

Hi All- I'm writing in a semi-panic. My favorite ice cream recipe involves a custard. I worked really hard not to overshoot, the thickening point, however I ended up with miniscule chunks of what I think are scrambled eggs. CAn I simply strain i t or will I end up with grainy ice cream if I try to use this custard base? Any help would be appreciated. I plan to churn this ice cream tomorrow.

Thanks again.

as an fyi- the recipe includes 8 egg yolks, 1.25 cups of sugar, 2.5 cups of milk and 2.5 cups of heavy cream.

#2 claire797

claire797
  • participating member
  • 1,164 posts

Posted 23 November 2004 - 11:43 AM

Hi All-  I'm writing in a semi-panic.  My favorite ice cream recipe involves a custard.  I worked really hard not to overshoot, the thickening point, however I ended up with miniscule chunks of what I think are scrambled eggs.  CAn I simply strain i t or will I end up with grainy ice cream if I try to use this custard base?  Any help would be appreciated.  I plan to  churn this ice cream tomorrow.

Thanks again.

as an fyi-  the recipe includes 8 egg yolks, 1.25 cups of sugar, 2.5 cups of milk and 2.5 cups of heavy cream.

View Post



I've had this happen before. In my case, straining worked just fine. There's enough fat in that recipe to prevent graininess even if you're missing some egg yolk.

#3 MichaelB

MichaelB
  • participating member
  • 393 posts

Posted 23 November 2004 - 01:52 PM

Strain it. You'll need a fine chinois -- or cheesecloth.

#4 foolcontrol

foolcontrol
  • participating member
  • 75 posts

Posted 23 November 2004 - 02:15 PM

Put it in the blender or hit it with an immersion blender. That is what we do at the cooking school.

#5 ludja

ludja
  • participating member
  • 4,440 posts
  • Location:Burque

Posted 23 November 2004 - 02:39 PM

Put it in the blender or hit it with an immersion blender.  That is what we do at the cooking school.

View Post


Then, strain it...
"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#6 thecuriousone

thecuriousone
  • participating member
  • 190 posts

Posted 24 November 2004 - 08:33 AM

Thanks to all who replied. I will blend, then strain.

May you all have a peacful holiday with family and/or friends...............

#7 KatieM

KatieM
  • participating member
  • 126 posts

Posted 24 November 2004 - 10:48 AM

Glad you posted this question. I was going to post along similar lines. I always strain my base through a chinois, but my question has to do with the optimal thickness/temp to bring the creme anglaise to. My recipe says 170-180F. That seems like a pretty wide window to me. And the well-defined-track-on-the-back-of-the-spoon test doesn't seem to be infallible to me either. I haven't made an ice cream I haven't been pleased with yet, but I'm just wondering if I could make it any better.

Would a thicker custard base make an ice cream that is firmer at room temp? Or am I on crack?
"First rule in roadside beet sales, put the most attractive beets on top. The ones that make you pull the car over and go 'wow, I need this beet right now'. Those are the money beets." Dwight Schrute, The Office, Season 3, Product Recall

#8 Woods

Woods
  • participating member
  • 227 posts
  • Location:Tallahassee, Florida

Posted 24 November 2004 - 02:59 PM

Glad you posted this question. I was going to post along similar lines.  I always strain my base through a chinois, but my question has to do with the optimal thickness/temp to bring the creme anglaise to.  My recipe says 170-180F.  That seems like a pretty wide window to me.  And the well-defined-track-on-the-back-of-the-spoon test doesn't seem to be infallible to me either.  I haven't made an ice cream I haven't been pleased with yet, but I'm just wondering if I could make it any better.

Would a thicker custard base make an ice cream that is firmer at room temp? Or am I on crack?

View Post



You have to heat the mixture to 180* to cook the eggs. You are making creme anglaise so it should not be too thick. I heat to 180 and strain and have had no problems. Good luck! Keep asking questions!

#9 culinary bear

culinary bear
  • participating member
  • 858 posts
  • Location:Preston, United Kingdom

Posted 24 November 2004 - 03:55 PM

In the UK, we're meant to heat to 71C for at least ten minutes (now a legal specification if we're using unpasteurised yolks).

*does calculations in head* that's 160F. Personally I find that the base I use :

1135ml double cream
1135ml whole milk
400g sugar
24 egg yolks
30g glucose
20g trimoline

starts to thicken at about 74C, which should equate to about 170F.

Also, be aware that ice-creams always have a better texture if the base is left to ripen for a period of about 12-24 hours before being churned.

What happens is that the semicoagulated (thickened) proteins swell and take up water from the base, leading to a smoother mouthfeel and better texture. Think of it as syneresis in reverse (syneresis is what happens when you severely overcook scrambled eggs - the proteins contract and squeeze out water, leaving you with that white milky liquid).

If I've accidentally slightly overthickened a base, I pop it in a barblender and then put it through a fine chinoise - it suffers very slightly in texture, but not a great deal.
Allan Brown

"If you're a chef on a salary, there's usually a very good reason. Never, ever, work out your hourly rate."