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Thanksgiving Day Wines


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#61 Mark Sommelier

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Posted 30 November 2003 - 07:53 AM

It seems that German rieslings are pretty common on this listing. Have they always been favorites for Thanksgiving or is that a relatively recent phenomenon for most of you? This is the first year I had it with my turkey, but it won't be the last.

John,
Only very smart people choose German rieslings. Must be a lot of smart people here. :cool:
Mark

#62 John W.

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Posted 30 November 2003 - 08:31 AM

Only very smart people choose German rieslings. Must be a lot of smart people here.  :cool:

Mark, I had a few glasses before I went to dinner. Does that qualify?
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#63 LJC

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Posted 01 December 2003 - 02:25 PM

Highlight was 95' Beaucastel CDP.

I opened 3 of my last 4 bottles and I think the time was right.
-practically no tannins left
-super smooth
-dark concentrated spicy fruit


How long should I hold my last bottle? I doubt it will get any better and may be going down hill. The last one I opened was in 2001 and it too was great. At that time I remember thinking that I shouldn't hold the others any longer.
What to do, drink or hold?

#64 ludja

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Posted 01 December 2003 - 03:15 PM

We started with

1. Gloria Ferrrer Sonoma Brut
alongside the appetizers of shrimp paste, oysters, cheese straws and roasted nuts.

2. Shug 2001 Sonoma County Sauvignon Blanc

with the creamless wild mushroom soup garnished w/parsley, croutons & creme fraiche.

3. David Bruce 2001 Santa Cruz Mountain Pinot Noir
&
4. Tokara Estate 2001 Yarra Valley Shiraz

w/the turkey, etc.

5. Alderbrook 1995 Sonoma Valley, Kunde Vineyard, Late Harvest Muscat de Frontignan

before the pies.

I've had and enjoyed David Bruce Pinot Noir (esp. Santa Cruz Mountains) many times and this again did not disappoint.

The two stars of the day were the Tokar Estate Shiraz and the Alderbrook dessert wine.

A friend (who was also at dinner) brought the Shiraz back from a trip down under this past year. I have never tasted anything quite like it! The shiraz had this wonderful toasty, almost smoky edge to it. Held up really well w/the turkey.

The Alderbrook Late Harvest Muscat was also wonderful--undertones of syrupy grapefruit and backbone w/enough acidity.


***By the way, has anyone else tasted wines from Tokar Estate or know anything more about this vineyard? Thanks.

Edited by ludja, 01 December 2003 - 03:16 PM.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#65 grandcru

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Posted 01 December 2003 - 04:08 PM

Adding to the body count:

NV Thierry Troccon Vin de Bugey Cerdon "Clos de la Bierle" - Pleasant if simple pink bubbly redolent of cranberries and pomegranate. The family liked it, so into the regular list it goes.

2001 Bruno Hunold Vin d'Alsace pinot gris - Ehh. Nice enough, and true-to-type with apple and citrus notes playing off the tell-tale honeyed finish. I need to try some of Hunold's cru wines to get a better fix on the house.
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#66 bills

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 10:41 AM

Had friends for thanksgiving dinner last evening:

Blue Mountain Brut (NV) – simple nose, good fizz, citric finish, equivalent to a decent Cava.

2003 De Wetshof Estate Lesca Chardonnay (S. Africa) – abundant fruit in nose, full and slightly sweet in the mouth, nice wine and recently on sale here.

With squash soup.

2002 Morgante Nero d’Avola (Sicily) – ripe hot nose with boysenberry and nutmeg, the wine slightly coarse but quite tasty nonetheless. For those days when you feel like a bit of rough trade….

With pasta with sage-butter sauce.


1989 Borgogno Barolo Riserva – some browning/fading at edges, mature nose without to much tar, still surprisingly tannic, ending well – juicy, and with some fruit that only appeared 4 hours after decanting.

With roast goose with baked pears and apple stuffing

1998 Brolo di Campofiorin – a selected batch of the regulat ripasso, actually lighter and drier than the Morgante had been, but decent cheese match. The typical ripasso nose, readily identifiable, was not heavy and the wine matched the cheese quite well.

#67 jackal10

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 10:55 AM

We just had 1996 Clos Windsbuhl Zind Humbrect Pinot Gris with goose.
Heaven.

"The goose is a silly bird; too much for one, and not enough for two"

Edited by jackal10, 09 October 2005 - 02:38 PM.


#68 Daniel Rogov

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 12:01 PM

Had friends for thanksgiving dinner last evening...



Bills, Hello...

You just taught me an important lesson for which I thank you. When I first saw your post I wondered just why someone was posting about this "American" holiday in October and not November. It took a minute....I checked and saw that you live in Canada, I did a bit of google research and discovered that Canada celebrates Thanksgiving on the second Monday of October. The thanks...for making me hyper-aware that I, like many who have lived in the United States of America for any length of time can be terribly ignorant of things specifically cultural to Canada. I will start doing some serious reading/thinking about those differences.

Thanks as well for sharing what sounds like a lovely evening

#69 Vinfidel

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 02:15 PM

daniel

the holiday here is nowhere near as big as in the US. it doesn't have the same historical background and veritas as in the us

Edited by Vinfidel, 09 October 2005 - 02:17 PM.


#70 chefboy24

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 05:01 PM

how do you have a hot nose?

love that nero d'avola, had it at otto. delicious. excellent grape.

#71 Brad Ballinger

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 06:21 PM

how do you have a hot nose?

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My guess is that Bill is using the word "hot" to mean "alcoholic." If I'm wrong, he'll say so. I've often tasted wines that have shown more alcohol on the nose than anything else.
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#72 jamiemaw

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Posted 10 October 2005 - 10:57 PM

daniel

the holiday here is nowhere near as big as in the US. it doesn't have the same historical background and veritas as in the us

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Speak for yourself. :biggrin:

And Thanksgiving Greetings from Kelowna, British Columbia (in the heart of the Okanagan Wine Country) . . .

Canadian Thanksgiving traditionally celebrates the end of harvest, the changeover from short pants to corduroy trousers, the brining of turkeys in driveway salt, and the beginning of the hockey season.

Canadian men have been exhausted for the past year as we've been suffering through the season-long National Hockey League strike. We're exhausted because this has meant endless home renovations and a lot of extra sex. But now we're returning to time-honoured rituals such as making love in the style of the hound so that both parties can enjoy the nightly hockey highlights reel.

We've been celebrating Thanksgiving for the past three days and nights as the harvest has been going on around us: the last of the tomatoes and the Bosc and Bartlety pears; Delicious, Spartan and McIntosh apples; and, of course, the wine grapes. It's going to be a solid, if not spectacular vintage, characterized by a warm August followed by big temperature spikes in late September: from 1˚C overnight to 25˚C (about 34˚ to 77˚ F) at 3pm.

The big reds are being hauled in from the Oliver benches, about an hour south, where the hand of the Sonora Desert reaches over the Canada/US border. We live in white wine and pinot noir country, high above the lake where the breezes keep the temperature a little lower in the summer.

Thanksgiving is a half-week festival--nay, orgy--of meats and local produce.

We certainly sampled many local bottles. The best local turkey accompaniment was the Mission Hill 03 Five Vineyards Dry Reisling (CDN $15.99--it won a gold medal at this year's Los Angeles County Fair wine competition) and the plush CedarCreek Platinum Reserve pinot noir (CDN $35.09).

Our long weekend began with a turkey dinner with the usual accessories (Brussels sprouts, peas, cranberry sauce, roasted carrots, sausage stuffing, whipped potatoes and a hearty gravy) on Friday night in Vancouver.

On Saturday, we came up to the wine country, about a 35-minute drive in a WestJet 737. Some German- and Ukranian-Canadian friends entertained us with a crab 'Nicoise' salad with a Louis-styled dressing, a lightly smoked ham, fabulous perogies and Ukranian sausages, squash and scalloped potatoes.

Last night was the big family and friends sitdown for 14: Oyama saucisson and beer in the garden, then, compliments of one of our guests, chef Murray Bancroft, a starter of Kobe beef slices over baby arugula in a simple lemon and olive oil vinaigrette.

At table: two turkeys, mashed potatoes, sprouts in sweet vinaigrette with walnuts, squash casserole, roasted carrots, etc.

The Kobe beef was sliced thinly and briefly seared--it had the near-texture and unctuous flavour of foie gras. Aunty Prim's Brussels sprouts (she lives there) were steamed and then finished in a maple syrup-raised vinaigrette. The local walnuts were added for crunch. They performed admirably.

All three dinners finished with pumpkin pie with whipped cream.

Of the many wines we sampled, it was one local and two long distance bottles that stood out. Last night's selections were the best: we started with Blue Mountain NV Brut bubbly.

Then spectacular bottles of 04 Loimer Reisling Langenlois (Austria) 12.0%/vol (CDN $24.90) that really shook hands with the bird--very elegant structure, minerally but supple.

With the non-cheese course after dessert (several guests were in distress by this point), we opened a bottle of 03 Spinifex Esprit from the Barossa (CDN $35.90). It's 40% granache, 34% mataro, 21% shiraz and 5% cinsault. Unfiltered and 15.0%/vol there were only 256 cases produced by Domain Jardin in Nuriootpa, SA. A delightfully complex bruiser from old, low-yielding vines.

Today is all about turkey sandwiches on Irish soda bread with mayonnaise, cranberries, salt and pepper. That's it. The fire is on, the recycling box is full, the hockey game comes later. We're going to open a bottle of 95 Gewurtztraminer Grand Cru Mambourg from Alsace and turn out the lights.

This is life--and the giving of thanks for all its abundance--as we know it here.

Cheers,

Jamie

Edited by jamiemaw, 11 October 2005 - 12:40 AM.

from the thinly veneered desk of:
Jamie Maw
Food Editor
Vancouver magazine

www.vancouvermagazine.com
Foodblog: In the Belly of the Feast - Eating BC

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#73 Abra

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Posted 29 October 2005 - 06:14 PM

Last night I made this dinner, and with it I opened a bottle left behind at my house by some kind eG member at some past event. I wish I knew who it was so I could thank them, because it's really a nice bottle.

It was the Syncline Alder Ridge Columbia Valley Roussanne 2003, and it was really perfect with this meal. Somehow it was round enough and had the perfect acidity for a dinner that was full of herbal flavors and lots of fat. Because this dinner had a lot in common with a Thanksgiving meal, I'm wondering whether this might be the perfect T-Day white, especially since it's about $20, which is good for a group event. Any opinions?

#74 Rebel Rose

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Posted 30 October 2005 - 12:19 PM

Roussanne is an interesting varietal, generally heavier and with an oilier mouthfeel than chardonnay, and with some of the expressive, exotic fruit of a viognier but not the viognier green edge finish.

We had a roussanne with dinner last night--grilled prawn and scallop kabobs in Tequila-lime marinade, with a huge, translucent halibut filet and asparagus, also grilled. The halibut had a little lime, Tequila, and soy and herb marinade. Tiny baked new potatoes with herb butter, and a sour cream, mayo, cayenne dipping sauce for everything.

Proud mama disclosure: all prepared by my 22-year-old son for his new grill-friend Sarah. She's a former employee, beautiful girl with a sweet voice and everybody loves her. I can't believe it! :wub:

Oops, almost forgot. Dinner was seafood because the anchor of the evening was Colin's made-from-scratch super creamy not-too-sweet cheesecake, no sinking, no cracks, with a fresh, tart raspberry cream topping. Served with zinfandel portesque by candlelight.

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#75 Brad Ballinger

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Posted 31 October 2005 - 01:34 PM

Whatever wine you want to serve is the right wine. Generally, though, you want a wine with plenty of acidity -- the usual suspects end up being Riesling, Beaujolais, Pinot Noir, and Champage. Some people also like to serve Zinfandel since it is (or at one time was) "American."

The thing with Thanksgiving dinner is that there are usually so many flavors and such going on, that it's good to have a variety of wines and let your guests pick for themselves.
We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink - Cicero

#76 Abra

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Posted 31 October 2005 - 08:43 PM

Although the local stores are all out of this wine, I called Syncline today and they have a couple of cases left, so they're shipping me half a dozen bottles. This, and the Yellow Hawk Mescolanza di Rosso will be my Thanksgiving wines. Neither will be traditional or expected, but both will be delicious.

#77 TrishCT

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 09:23 PM

Whatever wine you want to serve is the right wine.  Generally, though, you want a wine with plenty of acidity -- the usual suspects end up being Riesling, Beaujolais, Pinot Noir, and Champage.  Some people also like to serve Zinfandel since it is (or at one time was) "American."

The thing with Thanksgiving dinner is that there are usually so many flavors and such going on, that it's good to have a variety of wines and let your guests pick for themselves.

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Would you be so kind as to recommend a Riesling and Pinot Noir? Moderately priced, readily available if possible. Thanks, kindly. I am making Thanksgiving dinner for 20...none wine connoiseurs. I have about eight bottles of the sparkler Bugey Cerdon Renardat-Fache stored up, and because I love these people I might open a couple bottles of that also.

#78 TrishCT

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 10:47 AM

No riesling or pinot noir recs....anyone...?

#79 KatieLoeb

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 12:26 PM

No riesling or pinot noir recs....anyone...?

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For riesling I'd go with a Halbtrocken if you can find it. Or in a similar vein a nice Scheurebe goes very well with turkey.

For Pinot Noir my personal preference is for something less austere and "Burgundian" and more "New World-y" (CA or OR) because the more fruit forward style matches better with the usual side dishes like cranberry sauce or the earthiness of mushrooms in the stuffing.

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Cheers!
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#80 TrishCT

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 01:38 PM

Thanks, Katie!

#81 300rwhp

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 08:32 PM

I would recommend a wine from Thelema (mountain vineyard) named Ed's Reserve. It is a chardonnay but with something that in my opinion makes it the perfect compliment for turkey dinner. Thelema is a south african winery so it may be difficult to find but if you do give it a try should cost much either.

#82 Brad Ballinger

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Posted 05 November 2005 - 04:10 PM

Would you be so kind as to recommend a Riesling and Pinot Noir?  Moderately priced, readily available if possible.  Thanks, kindly.  I am making Thanksgiving dinner for 20...none wine connoiseurs.  I have about eight bottles of the sparkler Bugey Cerdon Renardat-Fache stored up, and because I love these people I might open a couple bottles of that also.

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Sorry, Trish. I've been laid up in bed with a bad cold, and haven't been online for a couple of days.

Most Rieslings you'll find will be moderately priced. Katie's recommendation of a halbtrocken or even a trocken is a good one, but you can do all right even with ones that have more sugar than those (just limit yourself to kabinetten or spatlesen). There are a lot of German wines from the 2003 vintage on shelves now. That was a very ripe vintage, and the wines will be lush, in general. If you find some 2002 around, I'd opt for those, particularly from the Pfalz. But you don't have to restrict yourself to Germany. There are some good Alsatian Rieslings that are moderately priced, and I would put Trimbach at the top of my recommendation list. Also Barmes-Buecher. And from Australia, Pike's is affordable and pretty decent. From California, I really like the Rieslings from Smith-Madrone.

For Pinot Noir, if you are going to keep it domestic, I like Sanford for moderately priced, solid pinot noir. Also, Adelsheim out of Oregon.
We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink - Cicero

#83 TrishCT

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Posted 05 November 2005 - 06:18 PM

Thanks Brad and 300! I can go wine shopping now!

#84 Susan in FL

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 12:26 PM

I'm finally getting around to finalizing the menu for Thursday, and I'm undecided on the wine to go with our first course soup, Celery Root Bisque with Thyme. This is the recipe, although there is a typo/mistake online -- there are no croutons with this soup.
We're serving bubbly with the hors d'oeuvres, and I thought of carrying that over into the soup course, but I would really rather have something different for each course.
Can you help me, please?
Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

#85 dockhl

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 12:55 PM

Susan~

What is your menu?

Kathy

#86 carswell

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 04:05 PM

Viognier works well with cream and herb flavours. Domaine des Goubert's Cuvée "V" is one of the best French vigoniers outside of Condrieu. California also has success with the grape; Calera's is one of my favourites.

#87 Brad Ballinger

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 08:36 PM

Gruner Veltliner.
We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink - Cicero

#88 Susan in FL

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 08:47 PM

Gruner Veltliner.

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I don't know what that is. :blush:



Viognier works well with cream and herb flavours. Domaine des Goubert's Cuvée "V" is one of the best French vigoniers outside of Condrieu. California also has success with the grape; Calera's is one of my favourites.

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I do know Viognier, and I imagine I will have an easier time finding a California Viognier than a good French one. I should have included in my post a reminder that I do live in central Florida -- the Daytona Beach area to boot-- which is not exactly a land of upscale wine shopping options. I think this may be a good possibility.



Susan~

What is your menu?

Kathy

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Thanks for your response, as well. I am running short of time, and will get back to you and let you know the rest of the courses I have planned.
Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

#89 Brad Ballinger

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 11:33 AM

Gruner Veltliner.

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I don't know what that is. :blush:

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Sorry, Susan. Gruner Veltliner is an Austrian wine made from the grape of the same name. The wines, which are dry, generally have a pleasant acidity level. They generally have some aromas/flavors of lemon, apple, and root vegetables. And some of the better ones will show off some white pepper aroma and flavor.
We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink - Cicero

#90 KatieLoeb

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 11:54 AM

Gruner Veltliner.

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I don't know what that is. :blush:

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Sorry, Susan. Gruner Veltliner is an Austrian wine made from the grape of the same name. The wines, which are dry, generally have a pleasant acidity level. They generally have some aromas/flavors of lemon, apple, and root vegetables. And some of the better ones will show off some white pepper aroma and flavor.

View Post


Gruner Veltliner is also known for its lovely minerality. And it pairs well with almost any type of food from scrambled eggs to caviar.

I have a PDF file of an article I wrote about Gruner Veltliner not long ago. I'd be happy to PM or e-mail it to you if you'd like.

Katie M. Loeb
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Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol