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Chartreuse and Cocktails with Chartreuse


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#91 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 07:53 PM

I make the Champs Elysées cocktail with yellow Chartreuse, not the green. I follow the ratio in the Savoy Cocktail Book almost exactly:

1.5 oz cognac
.75 oz sweetened lemon juice
.5 oz yellow Chartreuse
3 or 4 drops Angostura bitters

For the "sweetened lemon juice" I just eyeball about 3/4 of the measurement lemon juice, 1/4 simple syrup. I think it's one of the best cocktails out there. Works fine for me using Remy Martin VSOP.

Thanks for the advice. One more excuse for me to buy yellow Chartreuse!

#92 aviap23

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 02:44 AM

I tried this recipe, and I really enjoyed it. Thank you!

#93 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 05:33 PM

Widow's Kiss was our Halloween drink. By all evidence and nature, it needed a sinister name...

 

1.5oz cognac

0.75oz Bénédictine

0.75oz Green Chartreuse

2 dash Angostura bitters

 

003 (640x480).jpg

 

It is obviously super-herbal and spice-tasting, but actually a good cognac cocktail as well. Quite fruited.


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#94 haresfur

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 02:57 AM

So did the Widow's Kiss leave you with regret the next morning?

 

A timely revival of this thread.  Currently having a cocktail with Miss Fisher (ok watching the Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries on TV)  I was going to make a Carthusian Summer but in a rare event, I was out of lemons but had a couple of limes so I decreased the simple and used:

 

12 oz GinPlymouth
12 oz Simple syrup (homemade)
 
Love the chartreuse in this but it could use more gin or less soda (or both).

Edited by haresfur, 01 November 2013 - 02:58 AM.

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

#95 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 07:48 AM

 

So did the Widow's Kiss leave you with regret the next morning?

 

I did actually suffer a moment of unwarranted candour last night, one which I'm called to question with the cold sagacity of morning - but between the cocktail and the candour, we killed a bottle of Scotch, so I don't know which to blame.


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#96 A Bar Above

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 03:29 PM

I love working Chartreuse into cocktails that incorporate herb flavors in. One variation was a Pisco Sour with an oregano and thyme syrup, and I added .50 oz of Yellow chartreuse in there to really push up the herbal quality. I've noticed that the taste of Chartreuse develops much later in the palate, where herbal syrups develop much earlier. 

 

As a side note, some restaurants in the San Francisco Bay Area keep a bottle of VEP on their back bar as an homage to Harry Denton (of Harry Denton's Starlight Room), who was notorious for his love of the product. A manager I worked with in my career would tell me stories of working for him and the effect of VEP when consumed in mass. 


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#97 Jurges

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 02:57 PM

Just want to throw 2 recipes I've really enjoyed. Nik at Scott & Co. enlightened me one night when I was in a "spirit-heavy" mood. Since then, I've found myself going back to them quite often.

 

Tipperary variation (I forget the name):

1 oz Laphroaig 10yr Cask Strength

1 oz Campari

1 oz Green Chartreuse

Orange peel

-Stir/Strain chilled glass

 

The intense ingredients lead to a very complex cocktail. A lot going on, very dynamic as the glass warms up and temperature changes.

 

A less smokey version would be...

 

Crossing the Rubicon

3/4 oz Punt e Mes

3/4 oz Cynar

3/4 oz Campari

1/2 oz Green Chartreuse

1/4 oz Islay Scotch (Laphroaig 10yr CS)

w/ a Laphroaig wash 

-Stir/strain chilled glass 

 

Just my thoughts, enjoy


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#98 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 03:16 PM

Just want to throw 2 recipes I've really enjoyed. Nik at Scott & Co. enlightened me one night when I was in a "spirit-heavy" mood. Since then, I've found myself going back to them quite often.

 

Tipperary variation (I forget the name):

1 oz Laphroaig 10yr Cask Strength

1 oz Campari

1 oz Green Chartreuse

Orange peel

-Stir/Strain chilled glass

 

The intense ingredients lead to a very complex cocktail. A lot going on, very dynamic as the glass warms up and temperature changes.

 

 The first one is Chris McMillian's End of the Road.

 

The other one looks good too. Thanks for sharing.



#99 Jurges

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 05:52 PM

Awesome, thanks for the name refresher. Its been driving me crazy  :biggrin:



#100 SamChevre

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 08:40 AM

I'm another fan of the Bijou, mentioned earlier in the thread.  However, I think the other components need all the punch they can get to balance the Chartreuse.

 

My preference:

Equal parts Tanqueray Gin, Cinzano vermouth, Green Chartreuse; 1 dash orange bitters (Regan's).  (M&R vermouth is too light).



#101 Rafa

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 09:45 AM

I like the Bijou variant, mentioned earlier in this thread, that calls for dry vermouth rather than sweet and yellow Chartreuse rather than green. It makes for an herbal, lightly sweet Martini variation, or a dryer Alaska. 


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#102 Czequershuus

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 08:18 PM

A Last Word variant tonight, the Slurred Word

 

1 Oz Jamaican Rum(Smith and Cross)

0.5 Oz Green Chartreuse

0.5 Oz Maraschino

0.5 Oz Lime Juice

1 Oz Pineapple Juice

Shake with ice and strain into a rocks glass.

 

A strange variant, certainly, with the rather major addition of pineapple juice, but the skeleton of the original is there. The result is rather candy like, not unbalanced but on the sweet side. 



#103 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 06:21 PM

First we made a Purgatory by Ted Kilgore of Taste in St Louis.

 

2 1/2oz rye

3/4oz Bénédictine

3/4oz Green Chartreuse

 

It's a nice drink, fresh and lively, but maybe not that interesting.

 

Next we tried a Tipperary using Highland Park 12 based on Savoy Stomp recommendations.

 

002 (480x640).jpg


Edited by Plantes Vertes, 30 January 2014 - 06:23 PM.

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#104 Yojimbo

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 09:26 AM

I like the Bijou variant, mentioned earlier in this thread, that calls for dry vermouth rather than sweet and yellow Chartreuse rather than green. It makes for an herbal, lightly sweet Martini variation, or a dryer Alaska. 

I tried something like this last night; slightly more Beefeater gin than Carpano Bianco and yellow Chartreuse.  Despite a nice, long lemon twist, something was missing.  Bitters!  A hefty dash of Regan's and of Fee's Orange really helped dry it out and, as SamChevre mentioned, balance the Chartreuse. 

 

I usually don't need a reminder that bitters can really make the difference in a drink's balance, but if I did, this clinched it.


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#105 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 05 February 2014 - 10:13 AM

 

I like the Bijou variant, mentioned earlier in this thread, that calls for dry vermouth rather than sweet and yellow Chartreuse rather than green. It makes for an herbal, lightly sweet Martini variation, or a dryer Alaska. 

I tried something like this last night; slightly more Beefeater gin than Carpano Bianco and yellow Chartreuse.  Despite a nice, long lemon twist, something was missing.  Bitters!  A hefty dash of Regan's and of Fee's Orange really helped dry it out and, as SamChevre mentioned, balance the Chartreuse. 

 

I usually don't need a reminder that bitters can really make the difference in a drink's balance, but if I did, this clinched it.

 

Interesting that a white vermouth worked in that variation. With white vermouth being as sweet as red vermouth, and yellow chartreuse being sweeter than the green, the cocktail could have been overly sweet (the Bijou is already quite rich to begin with).



#106 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 11 March 2014 - 10:54 AM

Nearly identical to the Cloister from PDT (1.5 oz gin, 0.5 oz yellow Chartreuse, 0.5 oz grapefruit juice, 0.25 oz lemon juice, 0.25 oz simple syrup, grapefruit twist),

 

12199476103_c3c5fecae0_z.jpg

 

...last night I tried the Echo, Echo (from the Ordinary in Charleston) which switches to green Chartreuse and adds falernum to the mix.

1.5 oz gin (Beefeater), 0.5 oz green chartreuse, 0.5 oz grapefruit (I've also seen a version at 0.25 oz), 0.5 oz lemon, 0.25 oz falernum (homemade).

 

 

13073645614_b8e7f0d950_z.jpg

 

Beefeater is what they specify; I think I would like it too with a more juniper-forward gin like Junipero or Tanqueray. I went with 0.5 oz grapefruit but a bit less would be ok. The falernum gave it a little zing in the finish which was cool.


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#107 brinza

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Posted 02 April 2014 - 10:17 AM

I usually don't need a reminder that bitters can really make the difference in a drink's balance, but if I did, this clinched it.

Too true.  For example, the Alaska appears in some cocktail books as calling for orange bitters, but some books omit it.  I think the orange bitters make all the difference in the world in that drink.


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#108 Slimchandi

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 06:05 AM

I enjoyed this earlier this week, even if my only remaining gin wasn't top quality.

 

http://cocktailvirgi...is-special.html

 

I could see bumping up to 3/4 or 1oz each improving it vastly.



#109 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 12:21 PM

First we made a Purgatory by Ted Kilgore of Taste in St Louis.

 

2 1/2oz rye

3/4oz Bénédictine

3/4oz Green Chartreuse

 

It's a nice drink, fresh and lively, but maybe not that interesting.

 

 

I should have read your notes before trying the Purgatory. It was sweet and aromatic with a kick of citrus at the end, but a little too heavy for my taste and not that memorable except for the name maybe.

 

13458441945_cbe0c2809f_z.jpg
 



#110 lesliec

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 03:56 PM

The Purgatory is very similar to the Louis Special, with rye instead of gin and unequal proportions.  Maybe the Purgatory would be improved by cutting down the rye a tad.  Can't try it; I'm (temporarily) ryeless.

 

I made a Louis Special a couple of nights ago and agree with Slimchandi that bigger is better.  I used a full 30ml of each ingredient and recommend you do not drive or operate heavy machinery - or breathe too close to an open flame - after one of these.  Tasty.


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#111 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 04:08 PM

I should have read your notes before trying the Purgatory. It was sweet and aromatic with a kick of citrus at the end, but a little too heavy for my taste and not that memorable except for the name maybe.

 

13458441945_cbe0c2809f_z.jpg
 

 

Is it too Dante of me to wish that the Purgatory sip should be bitter and the back of the swallow ambrosially sweet?

 

ET spell right


Edited by Plantes Vertes, 08 April 2014 - 04:08 PM.

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#112 brinza

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 10:52 AM

I wonder if there is cause to define a sub-class of cocktails that could be described as "Super Aromatics" which might use the Bijou as the base model.  The sheer number of botanicals in a Bijou is staggering: the 130 from the Chartreuse, plus the dozen or two from the vermouth and the gin, and then bitters.  Furthermore, the Bijou has no other additives (juice, syrup, etc.) to adulterate the purely aromatic mix.

 

The base formula could be something like:

  • an herbal liqueur, such as Chartreuse (either variety), Benedictine, Strega, or a genepi.
  • vermouth, amaro, or quinquina
  • a botanical base spirit, such as gin, genever, or aquavit
  • bitters

Many of the drinks mentioned in this thread seem to follow this pattern.


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Mike

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#113 Czequershuus

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 05:31 PM

Since it was time to finish off a nearly empty bottle of Chartreuse, and then a then time shortly after that to celebrate opening up a new one, I have had these to in the last few days:

 

1.5 Oz Applejack (Laird's Bonded)

0.75 Oz Rye WHiskey (Rittenhouse Bonded)

0.75 Oz Green Chartreuse

1 ds Angostura Bitters

Stir, strain, up

 

A very nicely balanced(and frighteningly strong) cocktail. I was worried it may be too dry, but it is perfect. This is one I will likely be repeating.

 

And then, as I had acquired a new bottle(at the excellent price of 45 dollars), and since it is really starting to look like spring here, I made this

 

Spring Feeling Cocktail

1 Oz Plymouth Gin (Dry Fly Washington Gin)

0.5 Oz Green Chartreuse

0.5 Oz Lemon Juice

Shake, strain, up

 

I really like the smaller size of this one, it is a shaken drink I can put in my nice small martini glasses. And it lives up to its name, calling up notions of spring. 


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#114 lesliec

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 10:48 PM

Nice, Czequershuus.  The first one sounds like my kinda drink.  I take it it's your own creation?  Got  a name for it yet?

 

Lairds isn't available here, but my favourite bar has acquired a bottle from a travelling customer.  I might see if they can make me one of these when I'm in there next week.  Thanks.


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#115 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 11:03 PM

Since it was time to finish off a nearly empty bottle of Chartreuse, and then a then time shortly after that to celebrate opening up a new one, I have had these to in the last few days:

 

1.5 Oz Applejack (Laird's Bonded)

0.75 Oz Rye WHiskey (Rittenhouse Bonded)

0.75 Oz Green Chartreuse

1 ds Angostura Bitters

Stir, strain, up

 

A very nicely balanced(and frighteningly strong) cocktail. I was worried it may be too dry, but it is perfect. This is one I will likely be repeating.

 

What would this be like with yellow?  And what's the name of it?



#116 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 11:59 PM

Jo- Diamondback cocktail, and Diamondback Lounge with yellow chartreuse.

#117 Czequershuus

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Posted 12 April 2014 - 06:50 AM

Oops, forgot to post the name and link. Sorry for that oversight. It is called the One Eyed Jack and it is from the Chemistry of the Cocktail blog (Link)

 

I have no idea it it would work with Yellow, as I have never actually purchased any, but I can imagine it would be a worthwhile experiment. 

 

 

The Spring Feeling is from the Savoy, and I found it via Erik Ellestad's Savoy Stomp.



#118 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 14 April 2014 - 08:51 AM

Since it was time to finish off a nearly empty bottle of Chartreuse, and then a then time shortly after that to celebrate opening up a new one, I have had these to in the last few days:

 

1.5 Oz Applejack (Laird's Bonded)

0.75 Oz Rye WHiskey (Rittenhouse Bonded)

0.75 Oz Green Chartreuse

1 ds Angostura Bitters

Stir, strain, up

 

A very nicely balanced(and frighteningly strong) cocktail. I was worried it may be too dry, but it is perfect. This is one I will likely be repeating.

 

 

 

Oops, forgot to post the name and link. Sorry for that oversight. It is called the One Eyed Jack and it is from the Chemistry of the Cocktail blog (Link)

 

I have no idea it it would work with Yellow, as I have never actually purchased any, but I can imagine it would be a worthwhile experiment. 

 

 

So this One Eyed Jack is identical to the Diamondback cocktail except that the proportions of rye and applejack are reversed, and the Diamondback has no bitters. The Diamondback (1.5 oz rye, 0.75 oz applejack, 0.75 oz green chartreuse) is a modern adaption by Murray Stenson of the Diamondback Lounge cocktail, the yellow chartreuse version, which is also wonderful and extremely potent. I like to make it with calvados.

 

11989794724_34a9b87cb0_z.jpg
 


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#119 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 03:08 PM

I was looking for things to do with my Japanese whisky, and decided to try Adam's twist on the Bijou from the Drink thread.

 

 

Bijou twist:

 

25ml Yamazaki 12

25ml Green Chartreuse

25ml Martini Dry

2 dashes Mozart Chocolate Bitters

 

 

I used Hibiki 12, Dolin dry, and Bitter Truth Chocolate Bitters.

 

Very nice citrine color. I was a little concerned that the Hibiki, which is more subdued than the Yamazaki, might get lost with the other ingredients. But it worked out really well. Like its color, the cocktail is delicate & nuanced, with the flavor of the Hibiki coming through at the end. Will make again.

 

13885070215_b73ce07a46_z.jpg
 

 

 



#120 Hassouni

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 03:24 PM

These all sound awesome and I'm down to my last couple oz of the green magic after a Champs-Élysées last night:

1.5 Salignac VS
.75 lemon
.5 Chartreuse verte
.5 2:1 SS
2 dashes angostura

Pure elegance as always