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repairing a bland chili


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18 replies to this topic

#1 hollis

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Posted 31 October 2004 - 04:25 PM

i made the blandest pot of chili ever. any ideas of what i can to to add some flavor/spice to it?

#2 Suzanne F

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Posted 31 October 2004 - 05:01 PM

Whatever you do, DON'T just dump a bunch of raw chili powder into it. Then you'll have, well, gritty, slightly-less-bland chili.

If you do add any kind of chili powder (or powdered chilies), dry toast it first to develop the flavor; then add it as if you were tempering custard: add some of the liquid from the chili to the toasted powder, blend thoroughly, then add that back to the pot of chili.

Or you can pour in a favorite hot sauce, spoonful by spoonful, stirring well and tasting after each addition. What kind you add depends on what you've got (:rolleyes:), what's already in the chili, and what flavor you want to add (not just heat). I rather like Tabasco Chipotle for something like this, but it's really up to you.

Ooops, forgot to ask in the first place: what DID you already put into it?

Edited by Suzanne F, 31 October 2004 - 05:02 PM.


#3 Behemoth

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Posted 31 October 2004 - 05:16 PM

vinegar!

edited to add -- you can also try more salt. But seriously, vinegar usually really works wonders for me.

Edited by Behemoth, 31 October 2004 - 05:42 PM.


#4 aidensnd

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Posted 31 October 2004 - 05:44 PM

Kind of hard to answer without knowing what is already in there. It could be that you have enough flavorings but not enough salt. Or perhaps there aren't enough flavors. Chili powder, or some variety like ancho, pasilla, chipotle, and cumin are a nice way to add some easy flavor.

#5 chezcherie

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Posted 31 October 2004 - 05:50 PM

some pureed chipotle in adobo might do it?
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#6 viva

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Posted 31 October 2004 - 05:51 PM

An utterly lazy way is to add a jar of tasty spicy salsa. I do it all the time. It's heresy, but it's fast!
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#7 irodguy

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Posted 31 October 2004 - 06:11 PM

If you spiced it already but it does not have a bite then add Salt. Salt will help develop the heat in most cases. The vinegar idea is also quite valid.

If this does not help and you want quick heat. Add about 4 drops of Dave's Insanity Sauce

Just a few drops if you don't want to melt your pan :laugh:
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#8 bushey

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Posted 31 October 2004 - 07:56 PM

Along the lines of vinegar, I like to add some chopped pickled jalapenos. Salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper and a dash of tabasco may help as well.

#9 irodguy

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Posted 31 October 2004 - 08:31 PM

Of course if you want killer Chili that stands a good chance of melting your pot then go for Daves Ultimate Insanity Sauce.
Never trust a skinny chef

#10 Sid Post

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Posted 01 November 2004 - 02:20 AM

Hungarian paprika from a good spice shop will help pick it up.

You can also add a blend of good peppers and some hot onions. Take your chilli pot, or a bowl full at a time in a skillet, cook the onions down with some good paprika and other peppers as required, then add you bland chilli and heat through out for a while to mix the flavors.

#11 Mabelline

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Posted 01 November 2004 - 04:32 AM

I see you want flavor-slash-spice. Can we presume you mean not heat?
A can of plain ol' chopped green chiles will add spark. Vinegar is a tonic from the Gods. Salt should've already been, unless you can't do it.

#12 BeJam

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Posted 01 November 2004 - 08:17 AM

Oven-roast dried chilis, add a little garlic, cumin, paprika. Or a little dark beer, brown sugar or cocoa. Maybe top the finished product with some cooked bacon, fresh chilies, onions, and cheese.
Bode

#13 mnebergall

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Posted 01 November 2004 - 08:58 AM

Toss in a can of Rotel.

#14 fierydrunk

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 09:02 AM

The chili is a good texture, but has next-to-no-taste. I don't think it is just a matter of making it hotter (though that would help). It is a flavor issue--how much vinegar and what kind?

We are taking care of it this evening! For next time though, does anyone know where we should look for a totally killer chili recipe????

P.S. I also like the rotel idea.

#15 Really Nice!

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 09:20 AM

i made the blandest pot of chili ever.  any ideas of what i can to to add some flavor/spice to it?

View Post

I suppose we should start with what made it bland?

What kind of meat did you use?
Is it ground or diced?
Did you dredge the beef in flour and saute it first or did you just throw it in the pot?
Did you use water, canned broth or homemade beef stock?
What seasonings did you add and when?
Did you boil or simmer the chili?
How long did you let it cook?
Did you use a crockpot or stovetop and finish in a slow oven?
Did you let the finished chili sit a day or two in the refrigerator before judgement?
Drink!
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#16 Jason Perlow

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 09:25 AM

Add a couple of squares of bittersweet chocolate. Throw in some a can of chipotle chiles with adobo.
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#17 tryska

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 09:37 AM

take some oil, roast some cumin, chili powder and a half-stick of cinnamon.

take the cinnamon stick out and add the rest of the seasoning to the chili.

make sure to add enough salt as well.

#18 mnebergall

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Posted 04 November 2004 - 09:27 AM

The chili is a good texture, but has next-to-no-taste.  I don't think it is just a matter of making it hotter (though that would help).  It is a flavor issue--how much vinegar and what kind? 

We are taking care of it this evening!  For next time though, does anyone know where we should look for a totally killer chili recipe????

P.S.  I also like the rotel idea.

View Post


Look HERE for some chili recipes.

Edited by mnebergall, 04 November 2004 - 09:27 AM.


#19 Rachel Perlow

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Posted 06 November 2004 - 03:54 AM

Serve it with lime wedges. That is, vinegar in the kitchen (a teaspoon at a time), but to pick up the acid at the table, lime makes a much nicer presentation.