Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Subway Cocktail


  • Please log in to reply
39 replies to this topic

#31 Splificator

Splificator
  • participating member
  • 527 posts
  • Location:Brooklyn

Posted 28 October 2004 - 02:04 PM

That sounds very interesting.  Especially the gin/rum combination.  Not something that would ever have occurred to me

It wouldn't have occurred to me, either, until I came across it enough times to realize that a) it wasn't a typo b) it wasn't a joke and c) I should try it. There are a couple of rum/gin combos in the "Jamaican Jollifiers" section of the Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book that, it turns out, work pretty nicely.

Did the subway token make it into your final product, Sam? Without it, though, yours definitely sounds like one of the Old Waldorf drinks, which ain't a bad thing.

And slivovitz? Why not? I should be a mensch and go out and buy some.

--DW
aka David Wondrich

There are, according to recent statistics, 147 female bartenders in the United States. In the United Kingdom the barmaid is a feature of the wayside inn, and is a young woman of intelligence and rare sagacity. --The Syracuse Standard, 1895

#32 markovitch

markovitch
  • participating member
  • 265 posts
  • Location:PDX

Posted 28 October 2004 - 05:24 PM

my good friend Brooklyn Josh (prospect park) gave me a 'brass monkey'' many years ago: old E and orange juice. kind of like a ghetto mimosa.

some of these drink ideas sound fantastic.

makes me think tho... maybe i'll start a thread.
"The Internet is just a world passing around notes in a classroom."
---John Stewart
my blog

#33 slkinsey

slkinsey
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 11,087 posts
  • Location:New York, New York

Posted 29 October 2004 - 06:55 AM

So, I had some time to tweak mine:

1.5 oz : applejack
1.0 oz : straight rye whiskey (101 proof is what I've been using)
0.5 tsp : yellow Chartreuse
0.25 oz : fresh lemon juice
0.25 oz : 1:1 simple syrup
dash : Fee Bros. aromatic bitters

Shake hard with cracked ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a twist of lemon and a clean NYC subway token.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#34 Splificator

Splificator
  • participating member
  • 527 posts
  • Location:Brooklyn

Posted 29 October 2004 - 07:38 AM

Sam--
This sounds like a very serious contender indeed. I'll have to try it. (Do you know where to get the tokens cheap?)

I've done a little tweaking as well, on the "Express" version (the one with the rum), said tweaking consisting of ratcheting the gin back a little to 1 1/2 or 1 3/4 oz. Otherwise it has this...alcoholic taste. Not that there's anything wrong with that.


Old English 800 and orange juice. Now that's a Subway Cocktail. Sunny Delight or Tropicana?
aka David Wondrich

There are, according to recent statistics, 147 female bartenders in the United States. In the United Kingdom the barmaid is a feature of the wayside inn, and is a young woman of intelligence and rare sagacity. --The Syracuse Standard, 1895

#35 slkinsey

slkinsey
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 11,087 posts
  • Location:New York, New York

Posted 29 October 2004 - 08:02 AM

No idea where to buy tokens. I have several subway tokens (from several different cities) in a large dish I use whenever I have to empty my pockets of loose change in foreign currencies.

The subway token garnish, while kind of fun, is a little problematic actually. Since the drink includes citrus and is shaken rather hard, it's not exactly see-through. So it's hard to see the token sitting on the bottom of the glass. One possible solution might be to use a spiral of lemon zest cut with a channel knife and thread the token onto the peel.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#36 Pan

Pan
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 15,541 posts
  • Location:East Village, Manhattan

Posted 29 October 2004 - 09:29 AM

You may or may not be able to buy loose tokens at the New York Transit Museum Store. Their catalog shows various fancy-schmancy ways to buy tokens, like in a $75.00 lucite set, pendants, coasters, etc. You could always ask, but considering how much of a killing they're making on these tzatzkes, I doubt they'd sell an old token at a reasonable price.

I have some tokens that I could rustle up for a suitable fee, however. :laugh: :biggrin:

#37 JAZ

JAZ
  • manager
  • 4,886 posts
  • Location:Atlanta

Posted 29 October 2004 - 09:43 AM

One possible solution might be to use a spiral of lemon zest cut with a channel knife and thread the token onto the peel.

View Post


Or you could carve a facsimilie out of a disk of lemon rind. :cool:

#38 Splificator

Splificator
  • participating member
  • 527 posts
  • Location:Brooklyn

Posted 29 October 2004 - 09:52 AM

Or you could carve a facsimilie out of a disk of lemon rind. :cool:


I was thinking kumquat. I like yours better.
aka David Wondrich

There are, according to recent statistics, 147 female bartenders in the United States. In the United Kingdom the barmaid is a feature of the wayside inn, and is a young woman of intelligence and rare sagacity. --The Syracuse Standard, 1895

#39 slkinsey

slkinsey
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 11,087 posts
  • Location:New York, New York

Posted 29 October 2004 - 10:08 AM

Kumquat, along with lemonquat, sunquat and all the other members of the -quat family, has the advantage of having an edible rind, though.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#40 Splificator

Splificator
  • participating member
  • 527 posts
  • Location:Brooklyn

Posted 29 October 2004 - 10:47 AM

Kumquat, along with lemonquat, sunquat and all the other members of the -quat family, has the advantage of having an edible rind, though.

View Post


Does that include paraquat (gratuitous '70s reference to go with those Brass Monkeys)?
aka David Wondrich

There are, according to recent statistics, 147 female bartenders in the United States. In the United Kingdom the barmaid is a feature of the wayside inn, and is a young woman of intelligence and rare sagacity. --The Syracuse Standard, 1895