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Orgeat


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#91 Chris Amirault

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 06:08 PM

I can't find any, I'm afraid. The nuttiness of the orgeat probably wouldn't play very well with the tequila's spicy, astringent edge -- though I'm happy to be proven wrong.
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#92 tikibars

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 06:11 PM

I would say that Grand Marnier is a better sub for Curacao in a Mai Tai...


I did a GM Mai Tai last night and it came out really nice... and if there is one drink that I have down to a science it is this one.

By the way, not to get off of the orgeat subject too much, but in Tiki Road Trip, I suggest Appleton VX and St. James for rums in a Mai Tai, but lately I have been getting great results with just Brugal.
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#93 Chris Amirault

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 06:15 PM

Which recipe do you use?
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#94 Alchemist

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Posted 21 September 2008 - 08:36 PM

Bula Mai Tai El Dorado 5 Year, Lime, House Made Roasted Orgeat


This is a new cocktail on The Violet Hour Autumn menu. Steven is roasting the almonds for the home-made orgeat and then adding bitter orange, orange and rose water. It is f%$king awesome! It is so much more complex and deep, and rich, and perfect than anything I have ever tasted in the orgeat family.

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#95 feste

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Posted 22 September 2008 - 02:04 AM

Steven is roasting the almonds for the home-made orgeat and then adding bitter orange, orange and rose water.  It is f%$king awesome!  It is so much more complex and deep, and rich, and perfect than anything I have ever tasted in the orgeat family.

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That sounds so f'n delicious! Any way I could talk a recipe out of you Toby?
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#96 slkinsey

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Posted 22 September 2008 - 09:23 AM

Seriously, y'all... try making it with pistachio nuts instead of almonds.
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#97 bostonapothecary

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Posted 22 September 2008 - 09:36 AM

Seriously, y'all...  try making it with pistachio nuts instead of almonds.

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any good cocktails for this pistachio "orgeat"?

apple jack, peach brandy, pistachio "orgeat", angostura?
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#98 slkinsey

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Posted 22 September 2008 - 10:32 AM

I've found that pistacheat works well in any context that might call for orgeat.
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#99 lperry

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Posted 27 September 2008 - 12:50 PM

Does anyone know of any really great drinks that feature tequila and orgeat?

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Here's one. I don't know if it is any good - I found it while searching for drink recipes with orgeat. If nothing else, it might give you some ideas.

Steven is roasting the almonds for the home-made orgeat and then adding bitter orange, orange and rose water.  It is f%$king awesome!  It is so much more complex and deep, and rich, and perfect than anything I have ever tasted in the orgeat family.

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The roasting is genius. I've got my first batch of orgeat on the stove (FX method), and I did a light roast of the almonds under the broiler. (Roasting? Toasting?) As they were heating, all the oils came to the surface and they took on an amazing fragrance. Mai Tais mañana.

Edited to say that if you click on "orgeat syrup" on the site above, it will lead you to more drink recipes.

Edited by lperry, 27 September 2008 - 12:55 PM.


#100 lperry

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Posted 28 September 2008 - 08:48 AM

Many thanks to all the orgeat experimenters who posted here. I tasted my finished product, and it is fantastic. All I had tried before was Monin, and there is no comparison.

I ran into only one problem when I couldn't find my cheesecloth, so I substituted with a potato ricer. I figured if it would smash all the water out of frozen spinach, it would work for almond bits, and I could probably get more leverage from a device that was built for crushing. A few pieces of almond made it into the first "riced" batch, but I just poured that through a tea strainer and it worked just fine.

#101 Chris Amirault

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Posted 14 December 2008 - 11:53 AM

Using Sam's small-batch recipe, I made some today with equal parts almonds, pistachios, and apricot kernels (thank you, Trader Joe's). I really like the combination of the flavors and was careful not to overblend this time around. I haven't tried it in a drink yet, but I'm hopeful that I've addressed the consistency issues I raised above.

One note: skinning apricot kernels and pistachios sucks.
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#102 feste

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 09:30 AM

Hi all,

Am hoping for a little help here. I'm writing a post on commercial orgeat and am trying to get lists of ingredients for all the major brands. I haven't been able to find ingredients for either the Fee Bros. or the 1883 products. My local liquor store is out of the Fee's, and the bottle of 1883 I bought and brought into work to compare recipes with mysteriously disappeared...

Do any of you have either of these products lying around and would you be willing to post the ingredients?

Thanks so much!
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#103 db_campbell

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 06:31 PM

Hi all,

Am hoping for a little help here. I'm writing a post on commercial orgeat and am trying to get lists of ingredients for all the major brands. I haven't been able to find ingredients for either the Fee Bros. or the 1883 products. My local liquor store is out of the Fee's, and the bottle of 1883 I bought and brought into work to compare recipes with mysteriously disappeared...

Do any of you have either of these products lying around and would you be willing to post the ingredients?

Thanks so much!

View Post


1883:

"Ingredients : sugar, water, glucose-fructose syrup, natural aroma including natural almond extract. No preservative."

#104 marty mccabe

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Posted 16 January 2009 - 07:36 AM

Do any of you have either of these products lying around and would you be willing to post the ingredients?

Thanks so much!

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Fee's contains: corn sweeteners, sugar, water, natural and artificial flavor, citric acid, less than 1/10 of 1% Benzoate of Soda as a preservative, propylene glycol, xanthan gum, gum acacia and glyeryl abietate.

I think I need to go make some homemade stuff now...
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#105 samuraibartender

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 02:56 PM

Seriously, y'all...  try making it with pistachio nuts instead of almonds.

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any good cocktails for this pistachio "orgeat"?

apple jack, peach brandy, pistachio "orgeat", angostura?

View Post


Just did such a thing for the first time over New Years, like so:

http://rookielibatio...ears-pt-ii.html

This stuff is brilliant with the addition of Rosewater (over standard Orgeat's OF water) - a very Middle Eastern flavor combination methinks.

bostonapothecary - Made a killer Cameron's Kick variant; still playing with it or other cocktails. Funny you mention an Applejack combination - I was planning on trying a Japanese Cocktail variation using either Pear Eau de Vie or Laird's Bonded...

Cheers!

#106 Wild Bill Turkey

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 08:37 PM

Hi all,

Am hoping for a little help here. I'm writing a post on commercial orgeat and am trying to get lists of ingredients for all the major brands. I haven't been able to find ingredients for either the Fee Bros. or the 1883 products. My local liquor store is out of the Fee's, and the bottle of 1883 I bought and brought into work to compare recipes with mysteriously disappeared...

Do any of you have either of these products lying around and would you be willing to post the ingredients?

Thanks so much!

View Post

If you had any interest, I'd post the ingredients for Trader Vic's orgeat syrup, though in addition to making the Fee's and 1883 look like organic health-food products, it might also take up an entire page of the forum in a single post...

{Edited to add that, of the three, the 1883 has by far the most flavor}

Edited by Wild Bill Turkey, 20 January 2009 - 08:45 PM.


#107 dsoneil

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 09:09 PM

Another good substitute for almonds are Brazil Nuts. At one point in time they were referred to as "milk nuts".
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#108 slkinsey

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 07:02 AM

I'm thinking of ways to stabilize a homemade orgeat. Gum arabic, perhaps?
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#109 feste

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 11:34 AM

I'm thinking of ways to stabilize a homemade orgeat.  Gum arabic, perhaps?

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Possibly, although I think xanthan gum is preferred for stuff like this. If you can stabilize with gum arabic, I'd love to hear how much it takes.

I'm also curious about how to convey to people that just because something separates, it doesn't make it an inferior product. Is it so wrong to have to shake your bottle of orgeat before you use it each time? Are we so conditioned by industrial food that if we see separation or color variations or "refrigeration required" that we assume it's not a good product? Is there a way to battle this perception?
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#110 bostonapothecary

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 11:54 AM

I'm thinking of ways to stabilize a homemade orgeat.  Gum arabic, perhaps?

View Post

Possibly, although I think xanthan gum is preferred for stuff like this. If you can stabilize with gum arabic, I'd love to hear how much it takes.

I'm also curious about how to convey to people that just because something separates, it doesn't make it an inferior product. Is it so wrong to have to shake your bottle of orgeat before you use it each time? Are we so conditioned by industrial food that if we see separation or color variations or "refrigeration required" that we assume it's not a good product? Is there a way to battle this perception?

View Post


part of the problem is that all these recipes are perceived as "mad science" when they are closer to rural traditions... an old mans hobby or something someone's grandmother would make...
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#111 slkinsey

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 08:55 AM

I am hoping that the gum arabic (in addition to providing some extra silkyness in the mouthfeel) will not only prevent separation in storage, but perhaps also the "curdled" appearance the homemade product can have in certain cocktails. I'm also experimenting with different (less labor intensive and hopefully better) methods for making them. Today's experiment is liquifying the nuts and water together in the Vita-Prep, infusing an hour and draining through a 100 micron superbag. I have a new batch of pistacheat that turned out amazingly well this way, and an currently trying to see if I can make one using roasted pepitas.

Edited by slkinsey, 10 February 2009 - 08:55 AM.

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#112 dsoneil

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 12:33 PM

Two good methods of stabilizing oil / water emulsions (orgeat), are to use lecithin or maltodextrin.

Lecithin can be found at health food stores, but it is best to use the liquid variety as some bulk lecithin contain additional, non-soluble compounds.

Maltodextrin can be found a your local homebrew shop. It is a natural sugar, but isn't very sweet and rather flavourless. It helps to increase the viscosity of the orgeat, thereby making the emulsion more stable. It also helps by being a long chain organic which is soluble in water, but still interacts with the almond oil.

Gum Arabic might help, since it does increase viscosity, but other than that I'm not sure how much it will help. Usually a combination of ingredients is the best approach.
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#113 Chris Amirault

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 05:16 AM

Just made a double batch of Sam's recipe here using almonds, pistachios, and apricot kernels. After blending late last night, I went to bed and strained it in the morning; that laziness seems to have paid off, in that I haven't had to reblend or resoak the nutmeat to get a thick milk. I also added a 2:1 mix of cognac and Cointreau (I had batched it for Sidecars for a cocktail course) instead of the brandy.

This stuff is delicious.
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#114 RoyalSwagger

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 11:58 AM

After visiting Momofuku Ssam Bar in July, I have been influenced by a dessert I really enjoyed, Beet Lime Goats milk Ganache w/ pistachios. I decided I had to make it into a cocktail. Still don't have a name for it,

Beet infused Beefeater 2 oz
"Pistacheat" 1 oz
Lime 1/2 oz
3 pinches citric acid ( I wanted the tart of goat chz without overwhelming w/ lime)
White of 1 egg
Dry shake white w/ Lime and Citric Acid, add rest, Ice, Shake, Strain into Fizz Glass and top with 3/4 - 1oz of Seltzer

...and here I thought I was the only one using pistachio syrup, of course not, how ignorant. Damn good stuff, roasted/blanched pistachios with demerara, a pinch of salt, and both orange flwer and rose hydrosols.

Smile,
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#115 Chris Amirault

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 12:09 PM

That looks fascinating. Why demerara? I've always used white....
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#116 BittermensAG

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 03:59 PM

Though it's hard to find real tiger nut Horchata outside of Spain - it makes a very interesting substitute for Orgeat. I guess it should have been obvious for me to try it as Horchata is probably the root beverage that became Orgeat and Orzata as it moved throughout Europe (it's even called Orxata I think in Catalan) - same process of making a stable nut milk, just using an easier to find nut! Nice earthy tones - plays very well with dark rums and really takes to pimento dram.
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#117 eje

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 04:27 PM

It appears La Tienda sells Tiger Nuts (Chufa, Nut Sedge Kernels), so not so hard to find.

To me the idea that almond or rice orgeat became this or that beverage as it moved across cultures is the wrong way to look at it.

Cooking or soaking nuts and grains in water is just the easiest way to get some portion of their nutritional value out. Every culture has some sort of grain or nut beverage: Barley Water, Soy Milk, Horchata, Orgeat, Alote, etc. They are all basically the same thing. You don't need an oven or even a stove necessarily to make them and they are palatable to everyone including infants and invalids.

I believe it is more like convergent evolution, the common way to solve the common problem of getting nutrition from stored dried nuts and grains.

Not only that but as cooking techniques advance these beverages then become the foundation for more substantial food sources like tofu, tortillas, bread, beer, oat cakes, Marzipan, etc.
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#118 eje

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 04:31 PM

Oh yeah, besides, nut sedge was brought to Spain by the Muslims. It was originally cultivated in Egypt as a food source.

I would guess some nut sedge beverage or another significantly predates its use in Spain.
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#119 KD1191

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 07:16 PM

Just in case it isn't obvious from the above, the words horchata and orgeat share the same Latin root (hordeata).
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#120 RoyalSwagger

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 09:25 PM

That looks fascinating. Why demerara? I've always used white....


I usually use white for my orgeat as well, it was a first for me. I wanted something a little bit rougher than refined sugar, a little darker, unnecessary but, all in the name of change.