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Orgeat


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#271 Hassouni

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 02:45 PM

Last night I was looking for something with orgeat and a dark spirit, but not a Mai Tai. And I was not after something like the Japanese or its bourbon cousin, the Attorney Privilege, both very good cocktails when I am in the mood for a sweeter flavor profile.

 

After trying one of Chris McMillians' creation with the End of the Road recently, I tried a cocktail that was named after him, the McMillian which incorporates some of his favorite ingredients: rye, orgeat, curacao, Benedictine, lemon juice, Angostura bitters, and mint.

 

10164462823_eec1ed62da_z.jpg
 

After a mint aroma, the first impression is that this is a strong rye-forward cocktail. It tastes sharp even though there is only a small amount of lemon (I used a Meyer lemon as I was out of regular lemons). It has a strong spice and orange oil finish. Interestingly, the mint blended with the other ingredients to add another layer of flavor, but there was no mint flavor per se.

 

It was perfect for the first day of fall weather in San Diego (rain for the first time in months and 65F today... brrr).

 

Hey, I have all these ingredients, I may have to make this, thanks again Princesse!



#272 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 03:15 PM

 

Hey, I have all these ingredients, I may have to make this, thanks again Princesse!

 

Hassouni - You are very welcome.

 

 

 

It was perfect for the first day of fall weather in San Diego (rain for the first time in months and 65F today... brrr).

That drink sounds tasty. I can't get Rittenhouse but I suppose I could try a less potent version with the Sazerac 6 I have. It actually warmed up to 67F here today after a couple weeks of hovering in the 35F - 45F range. Feels like summer again.

 

You are located in Canada, right?

The Sazerac should make an excellent version too. I like that rye; I just think that it's a little pricey for what it is (at least in the US where it is significantly more expensive than Rittenhouse).



#273 Tri2Cook

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 04:05 PM

You are located in Canada, right?

The Sazerac should make an excellent version too. I like that rye; I just think that it's a little pricey for what it is (at least in the US where it is significantly more expensive than Rittenhouse).

 

Yep, in Canada. Rittenhouse is available through the LCBO and, even here, is cheaper than the Saz but no stores within a few hundred km of where I live stock it. I had a bottle at one time but it and one of the 2 bottles of Sazerac I grabbed when it was available have already went to a better place. I'm being really stingy with the remaining bottle. I use it but I don't often offer it to anyone else. :biggrin:


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#274 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 06:59 PM

Good timing for this thread to come up again!  I just ordered orgeat and gum syrup from feste's website.



#275 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 10:43 PM

A riff on Anthony Schmidt's Autumn in Jersey (the original uses applejack which I replaced with calvados): 2 oz calvados, 3/4 oz each homemade orgeat and lemon juice, 2 dashes angostura. It's essential an Army & Navy with a different base liquor. I really like these flavors.

 

I'm enjoying one of these while dinner cooks. Very nice balance.  Let me put in another plug for Small Hand orgeat.   I had been afraid 3/4 oz would be too much lemon, but just right. For the spirit I used Laird's 7 1/2 year old. I can't see why anyone would want to use applejack in this. My garnish is a cinnamon stick. Nice gesture, but in the big glass it looks a little lost.

 

Very pleased with this recipe! I wanted to repost FrogPrincesse' pretty picture of it but the system wouldn't let me.



#276 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 09:12 AM

 

A riff on Anthony Schmidt's Autumn in Jersey (the original uses applejack which I replaced with calvados): 2 oz calvados, 3/4 oz each homemade orgeat and lemon juice, 2 dashes angostura. It's essential an Army & Navy with a different base liquor. I really like these flavors.

 

I'm enjoying one of these while dinner cooks. Very nice balance.  Let me put in another plug for Small Hand orgeat.   I had been afraid 3/4 oz would be too much lemon, but just right. For the spirit I used Laird's 7 1/2 year old. I can't see why anyone would want to use applejack in this. My garnish is a cinnamon stick. Nice gesture, but in the big glass it looks a little lost.

 

Very pleased with this recipe! I wanted to repost FrogPrincesse' pretty picture of it but the system wouldn't let me.

 

If you liked this one, you could try the gin version too (Army & Navy). It's beautiful with a good orgeat and a juniper-forward gin.



#277 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 09:38 AM

 

If you liked this one, you could try the gin version too (Army & Navy). It's beautiful with a good orgeat and a juniper-forward gin.

 

Alas, I do not care for the taste of gin.  However the Japanese is an orgeat drink I'd like to make if I had any cognac.

 

When you make the Autumn in Jersey how much ice do you use?  I half filled a quart jar with crushed ice for mine, and I think it may have been a bit much, though the resulting drink fit the 15 1/2 oz glass perfectly.



#278 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 10:11 AM

 

When you make the Autumn in Jersey how much ice do you use?  I half filled a quart jar with crushed ice for mine, and I think it may have been a bit much, though the resulting drink fit the 15 1/2 oz glass perfectly.

 

 

It's hard to tell exactly how much. Typical process consists of mixing the drink in a cocktail shaker with crushed ice (for two I am guessing about 20 oz crushed ice), dumping the contents (including the crushed ice) into two old-fashioned glasses, and then topping with a heap of crushed ice so that the ice is above the liquid and ideally above the rim of the glass as well  (assuming your glass is not too large - 15 1/2 oz seems quite big). By the way there should be a mint garnish on this one.
 


Edited by FrogPrincesse, 22 October 2013 - 10:14 AM.


#279 Rafa

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 10:22 AM

 

 

If you liked this one, you could try the gin version too (Army & Navy). It's beautiful with a good orgeat and a juniper-forward gin.

 

Alas, I do not care for the taste of gin.  However the Japanese is an orgeat drink I'd like to make if I had any cognac.

 

When you make the Autumn in Jersey how much ice do you use?  I half filled a quart jar with crushed ice for mine, and I think it may have been a bit much, though the resulting drink fit the 15 1/2 oz glass perfectly.

 

 

Do you like tequila? You might enjoy Giuseppe Gonzalez's Infante, with tequila, lime, and orgeat.

 

Edit: the bourbon version of the Japanese Cocktail is well worth trying.


Edited by Rafa, 22 October 2013 - 10:24 AM.

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#280 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 09:32 PM

 

Do you like tequila? You might enjoy Giuseppe Gonzalez's Infante, with tequila, lime, and orgeat.

 

Edit: the bourbon version of the Japanese Cocktail is well worth trying.

 

 

I've only had a tequila drink once, and I can't really say whether I liked it or not.  It was sort of so, so -- and the drink had too much citrus, probably lime.

 

I like bourbon, but I don't have any.  For the Japanese I think I would like brandy better.



#281 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 09:33 PM

 

 

When you make the Autumn in Jersey how much ice do you use?  I half filled a quart jar with crushed ice for mine, and I think it may have been a bit much, though the resulting drink fit the 15 1/2 oz glass perfectly.

 

 

It's hard to tell exactly how much. Typical process consists of mixing the drink in a cocktail shaker with crushed ice (for two I am guessing about 20 oz crushed ice), dumping the contents (including the crushed ice) into two old-fashioned glasses, and then topping with a heap of crushed ice so that the ice is above the liquid and ideally above the rim of the glass as well  (assuming your glass is not too large - 15 1/2 oz seems quite big). By the way there should be a mint garnish on this one.
 

 

I think I used too much!



#282 Hassouni

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 09:51 PM

Last night I was looking for something with orgeat and a dark spirit, but not a Mai Tai. And I was not after something like the Japanese or its bourbon cousin, the Attorney Privilege, both very good cocktails when I am in the mood for a sweeter flavor profile.

 

After trying one of Chris McMillians' creation with the End of the Road recently, I tried a cocktail that was named after him, the McMillian which incorporates some of his favorite ingredients: rye, orgeat, curacao, Benedictine, lemon juice, Angostura bitters, and mint.

 

10164462823_eec1ed62da_z.jpg
 

After a mint aroma, the first impression is that this is a strong rye-forward cocktail. It tastes sharp even though there is only a small amount of lemon (I used a Meyer lemon as I was out of regular lemons). It has a strong spice and orange oil finish. Interestingly, the mint blended with the other ingredients to add another layer of flavor, but there was no mint flavor per se.

 

It was perfect for the first day of fall weather in San Diego (rain for the first time in months and 65F today... brrr).

 

So I made this last night. Using Senior's Curaçao, an orgeat recipe I can't remember (SLKinsey's maybe?), and Jerry Thomas Bitters as I'm out of Angostura (criminal, I know).

 

I didn't get much mint aroma, nor did I get the rye-forward sensation, despite also using Rittenhouse. I got a very smooth, creamy, delicately spiced taste, not sharp at all. If I were to make it again, I'd up the lemon, dial back the orgeat a bit, and perhaps Angostura might provide a different sensation.  Quite complex, but a bit too "soft" for my liking


Edited by Hassouni, 22 October 2013 - 09:51 PM.


#283 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 11:19 PM

[...]
I didn't get much mint aroma, nor did I get the rye-forward sensation, despite also using Rittenhouse. I got a very smooth, creamy, delicately spiced taste, not sharp at all. If I were to make it again, I'd up the lemon, dial back the orgeat a bit, and perhaps Angostura might provide a different sensation.  Quite complex, but a bit too "soft" for my liking

Too bad that it didn't quite hit the spot for you. Maybe I just got lucky with my choice of ingredients, or our taste buds are just different.

#284 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 10:54 AM

This one made last weekend, with orgeat and a cinnamon-absinthe combo, is unmistakably a tiki drink in the vein of Don the Beachcomber's best creations, even though it's rye-based. But don't tell anyone or they may call it tacky... :raz:

 

10414438214_de8c663a28_z.jpg
 

Winter Diamondback from El Dorado Cocktail Lounge, another hipster hangout in downtown San Diego that just celebrated its 5 years. 

 

Rye, lemon juice, homemade orgeat, cinnamon syrup, black walnut bitters, egg white, absinthe rinse, and a grated nutmeg garnish. It is essentially Harry Craddock's excellent Rattlesnake with a sweetener change, with cinnamon syrup and orgeat replacing the simple syrup.

 

I don't have black walnut bitters so I make do with Fee's whiskey-barrel aged bitters. It still worked for me.



#285 EvergreenDan

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 11:50 AM

This one made last weekend, with orgeat and a cinnamon-absinthe combo, is unmistakably a tiki drink in the vein of Don the Beachcomber's best creations, even though it's rye-based. But don't tell anyone or they may call it tacky... :raz:

tackytiki.jpg


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#286 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 11:53 AM

That looks SO much better. Thanks Dan.



#287 Rafa

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 03:32 PM

Dan, can we get a Tiki skin for Kindred Cocktails, please? 


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#288 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 11:23 PM

 

 

When you make the Autumn in Jersey how much ice do you use?  I half filled a quart jar with crushed ice for mine, and I think it may have been a bit much, though the resulting drink fit the 15 1/2 oz glass perfectly.

 

 

It's hard to tell exactly how much. Typical process consists of mixing the drink in a cocktail shaker with crushed ice (for two I am guessing about 20 oz crushed ice), dumping the contents (including the crushed ice) into two old-fashioned glasses, and then topping with a heap of crushed ice so that the ice is above the liquid and ideally above the rim of the glass as well  (assuming your glass is not too large - 15 1/2 oz seems quite big). By the way there should be a mint garnish on this one.
 

 

 

Tonight I tried again, and upped the proportions:

 

2 1/2 oz Laird's

1 oz lemon juice

1 oz orgeat

few splashes of angostura

 

Instead of crushed ice I used two trays of tiny little ice cubes.  I shook in a pint jar rather than a quart.  Garnish, this time, was a lovely sprig mint.  Very nice, although it did not fill the glass..  Very pleased that the drink did not get diluted before the end.

 

And then not to waste the ice and mint, I topped it up with orgeat and a shot of Appleton.  Alas, too lazy to juice a lime.



#289 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 11:01 PM

Ha, ha! I was going to say I did something different, but I see tonight's Autumn in Jersey is exactly the same as what I made above, except for straining into fresh ice. Although this time I used enough ice to intentionally overfill the glass, and, alas, the mint in the store tonight did not look worth taking home. So no garnish.

 

I'm picking up a strong (and very agreeable) cinnamon note here. I wonder if that is from the Angostura or from my imagination? This drink is very very good. I've been having a lot of mai tais of late, but I find myself tiring of Cointreau (after downing half a 750 ml bottle in a couple weeks). Fortunately (or unfortunately for my pocketbook) I grow more fond of orgeat.

 

Straining after shaking, though, is a real pain. I am looking into purchasing a cobbler shaker to get around this problem.



#290 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 09:48 PM

About to pop another bottle of Small Hand orgeat, I made another Autumn in Jersey tonight (I live here and it is still autumn) -- but this time just shake and dump.  I'm not convinced straining is worth the extra effort and the extra ice.  As it is, three trays of ice in one drink.  My hands can't take much more than that.

 

Sure is good.



#291 Czequershuus

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 06:50 PM

After restocking BG Reynolds Orgeat two weeks ago, I decided to embark on a couple of Mai Tai variation that had been building up in a to-try list.

 

Last weekend I went for the Bitter Mai Tai:

 

1.5 Oz Campari

0.75 Oz Smith & Cross

1 Oz Lime Juice

0.75 Oz Orgeat

0.5 Oz Cointreau

Shake with ice, strain over crushed ice. Garnish? Do you think there is any fresh mint in Minnesota right now?

 

My first time making this with all the intended ingredients together. A masterful slow sipping cocktail.

 

Then earlier today I found myself indulging in the Tia Mia:

 

1 Oz Mezcal (Del Maguey Vida)

1 Oz Jamaican Rum (Appleton V/X)

0.25 Oz Cointreau

0.5 Oz Orgeat

0.5 Oz Simple Syrup(Rich Turbinado)

0.75 Oz Lime Juice

Shake with ice, strain over crushed ice.

 

Wow. I must say, Mezcal may just be a new favorite base spirit. My bottle of Vida has yet to produce a cocktail that is less than extraordinary.

This was a wonderful variation, the that oddly matches the funk role an Agricole might play in a normal Mai Tai.

 

Finally, I am currently enjoyinh a Mai-TaIPA, courtesy of Jacob Grier's Liquidity Preference blog.

 

1.5 Oz IPA(Ballast Point Sculpin)

1 Oz White Rum (Angostura)

1 Oz Aged Rum (Flor de Cana 4 Year)

1 Oz Lime Juice

0.75 Oz Orgeat

0.5 Oz Cointreau

Shake with ice, strain into a collins glass over ice.

 

Yummy! Sculpin is a fantastically balanced IPA to start, and it add so much here. Sort of a grapefruit flavor, but with that wonderful hoppy bitterness. I think my instinct to avoid a powerful rum was correct here. This one ask for the rum to stand in the background. Lovely.

 

Now, the problem is there is still so much Orgeat left, and it only lasts about a month or so. Guess I will have to do more drinking.


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#292 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 07:18 PM

Hmm, I had no trouble finishing off a large bottle of orgeat in a month.  We should have worse problems.  I was looking at Reynolds' website this afternoon, primarily for the cinnamon syrup.  However for my orgeat I plan to continue to buy from feste.  She makes great stuff.

 

As fond as I am of IPA, my stomach cannot picture it in a mai tai.  Maybe I will work up the courage.  I have some Stone in the refrigerator.

 

At the end of the day, all I can suggest is practice, practice, practice.



#293 EvergreenDan

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 07:21 PM

The Bitter Mai Tai is how I drink up orgeat before it goes bad.


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#294 campus five

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 03:31 PM

Damn, I love a bitter mai tai.

And while Los Angeles is barely registering what other people around the country would consider "fall", I'm firmly in the warming, fall/winter flavor palate. Been making a lot of Boulevardiers/Left Hands (2 Rittenhouse / .75 Campari / .75 Carpano, lemon peel).

On the Campari yet winter profile, we an amazing Americano variation the other night at Big Bar (at the Alcove) here in Los Angeles.
Old Man Winter - approximate ratios since I'm not sure exactly how big the glassware is. 1/2 Campari; 1/4 Cardamaro; 1/4 Nocino; rocks, top with soda, orange peel.

I've been dying to find a really good application for the Cardamaro, and that means I have to go get some Nocino to make these at home.

#295 campus five

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 09:49 PM

D'oh. Sorry, I forgot this wasn't the Drinks threat. 



#296 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 10:07 AM

Finally, I am currently enjoyinh a Mai-TaIPA, courtesy of Jacob Grier's Liquidity Preference blog.

 

1.5 Oz IPA(Ballast Point Sculpin)

1 Oz White Rum (Angostura)

1 Oz Aged Rum (Flor de Cana 4 Year)

1 Oz Lime Juice

0.75 Oz Orgeat

0.5 Oz Cointreau

Shake with ice, strain into a collins glass over ice.

 

Yummy! Sculpin is a fantastically balanced IPA to start, and it add so much here. Sort of a grapefruit flavor, but with that wonderful hoppy bitterness. I think my instinct to avoid a powerful rum was correct here. This one ask for the rum to stand in the background. Lovely.

 

 

I tried this last night with Flor de Cana for the white rum, Plantation Barbados for the aged rum, and homemade orgeat. For the beer I went a little overboard and used Stone RuinTen IPA ("A Stage Dive into a Mosh Pit of Hops", IBU 110).

 

Well, this was surprisingly delicious and refreshing. The IPA added a bitter element and grapefruit notes, with the hops contributing some crazy herbal/floral flavors. I will make this again for sure.

 

10955421253_09c70da47d_z.jpg
 


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#297 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 12:53 AM

I checked my inventory and sadly all I have in stock is Stone Thirteenth Anniversary.  Made more or less regular mai tais tonight.  Maybe I can get to the store tomorrow.

 

http://www.stonebrew.com/13th/ale/



#298 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 03:10 PM

After restocking BG Reynolds Orgeat two weeks ago, I decided to embark on a couple of Mai Tai variation that had been building up in a to-try list.

 

[...]

 

Then earlier today I found myself indulging in the Tia Mia:

 

1 Oz Mezcal (Del Maguey Vida)

1 Oz Jamaican Rum (Appleton V/X)

0.25 Oz Cointreau

0.5 Oz Orgeat

0.5 Oz Simple Syrup(Rich Turbinado)

0.75 Oz Lime Juice

Shake with ice, strain over crushed ice.

 

Wow. I must say, Mezcal may just be a new favorite base spirit. My bottle of Vida has yet to produce a cocktail that is less than extraordinary.

This was a wonderful variation, the that oddly matches the funk role an Agricole might play in a normal Mai Tai.

 

 

After Czequershuus and lesliec, I too tried the Tia Mia. I was intrigued when I found out it was Ivy Mix's creation. Not really surprising, because she is really into mezcal.

 

11003469563_8cda51052d_z.jpg
 

I used Appleton 12, Vida mezcal, Pierre Ferrand dry curaçao per the original recipe, and homemade orgeat. I went with the ratios from the original recipe and 1 tsp of simple syrup instead of sugar. I figured that I could always add more, and it was fine as is.

 

The mezcal is great is this drink. I did not find it overpowering but you can definitely taste it. It's complex, smoky and funky.

 

Oh, and I was going to forget - I followed the advice of pros, and poured it on fresh ice instead of lazily shaking and dumping. I am a convert now.


Edited by FrogPrincesse, 26 November 2013 - 03:12 PM.

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#299 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 10:46 PM

I have never tasted mezcal, but I have to ask:  what would happen if one used all mezcal in a mai tai recipe and no rum?  I'm sitting here drinking a Daiquiri from New Jersey rum while wearing Oaxacan earrings.  I might as well be consistent.



#300 Hassouni

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Posted 27 November 2013 - 07:52 AM

you would have a hell of a smokey mai tai. Think the mid-level of peated whisky, like Caol Ila. It would also be drier.