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"Turning" the dough


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31 replies to this topic

#31 andiesenji

andiesenji
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Posted 12 October 2004 - 07:46 AM

I work quite often with slack doughs and my favorite way is to use a large dough trough.

I can't do as much kneading by hand as I used to, because of arthritis in my hands. Working the softer slack doughs in a dough trough is much easier and turning or folding is integral to working dough in this type of container.
The largest one I have, used most often, is shaped rather like a shallow canoe and it is simple to press the dough flat in the bottom then fold in each end, then tip the bowl so the mass of dough folds over on itself.
I usually cover the trough with a piece of waxed linen as plastic wrap will not stick well to the wood surface. The linen is heavy enough to conform to the shape of the bowl and the waxed surface holds the moisture in and even rather wet dough will not stick to it.

If anyone wants to know how to make waxed linen (or muslin) I can tell them in an email as it would probably be considered off topic.

Dough troughs or bowls are getting difficult to find, however Lehman's still carries them at a rather modest price considering that many "antique" ones are selling for hundreds of dollars.
this one is somewhat smaller than the one I use most of the time but it is still a respectable size and very workable.
Another advantage is that you don't have to stand while working the dough in the bowl. I injured my back earlier this year and have had difficulty standing for long periods. I can sit with my feet up on a footstool with the dough trough on my lap and work the dough with no difficulty.
It may seem a bit odd at first but if you routinely work with slack doughs, try one of these and I believe you will be plesantly surprised at how easy it is.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#32 lovebenton0

lovebenton0
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  • Location:Kenosha WI, on Lake Michigan

Posted 16 October 2004 - 12:41 PM

I work quite often with slack doughs and my favorite way is to use a large dough trough. 

I can't do as much kneading by hand as I used to, because of arthritis in my hands.  Working the softer slack doughs in a dough trough is much easier and turning or folding is integral to working dough in this type of container. 
The largest one I have, used most often, is shaped rather like a shallow canoe and it is simple to press the dough flat in the bottom then fold in each end, then tip the bowl so the mass of dough folds over on itself. 
I usually cover the trough with a piece of waxed linen as plastic wrap will not stick well to the wood surface.  The linen is heavy enough to conform to the shape of the bowl and the waxed surface holds the moisture in and even rather wet dough will not stick to it. 

If anyone wants to know how to make waxed linen (or muslin) I can tell them in an email as it would probably be considered off topic. 

Dough troughs or bowls are getting difficult to find, however Lehman's still carries them at a rather modest price considering that many "antique" ones are selling for hundreds of dollars.
this one is somewhat smaller than the one I use most of the time but it is still a respectable size and very workable. 
Another advantage is that you don't have to stand while working the dough in the bowl.  I injured my back earlier this year and have had difficulty standing for long periods.  I can sit with my feet up on a footstool with the dough trough on my lap and work the dough with no difficulty. 
It may seem a bit odd at first but if you routinely work with slack doughs, try one of these and I believe you will be plesantly surprised at how easy it is.

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Thank you, andiesenji! I've been looking for one of these for a very long time! :biggrin: It looks good, but they are running low . . . I hope it's still around when they take my order.
Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite