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The Pecan Pie Topic

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#31 claire797

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Posted 13 November 2004 - 11:01 AM

Here's the one I've been using. It outstanding -- smooth, rich, and sweet but not overly sweet. It has a deep flavor from the toasted pecans and browned butter.



Pecan Pie

3/4 cup butter
2 cups light brown sugar, packed
3 eggs
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1 1/2 cups pecan pieces
9 inch unbaked pie shell

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In a large skillet, toast pecans. Remove from skillet.

Add butter to skillet and heat over medium until browned. Reduce heat and stir in brown sugar. Let brown sugar melt a bit and turn off heat. Let cool for about 5 minutes.

In a separate bowl, mix eggs, salt and vanilla. Stir in butter/sugar mixture and pecans. Pour into unbaked pie shell Bake in preheated oven at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.
  • Gary Traffanstedt likes this

#32 bleudauvergne

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Posted 13 November 2004 - 11:52 AM

This reminds me of the Search for mama's pie recipe thread. :smile:

Question : for these recipes, any thoughts on substituting walnuts for the pecans? I live in a place where walnuts are much less expensive. Thanks.

#33 Timh

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Posted 13 November 2004 - 01:37 PM

Check my recipe posted earlier.

#34 Redsugar

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Posted 13 November 2004 - 02:22 PM

Question : for these recipes, any thoughts on substituting walnuts for the pecans? I live in a place where walnuts are much less expensive. Thanks. ~ bleudauvergne


Cream together 8 ounces sweet butter & 9 ounces (1½ cups) light-brown sugar. Add 4 eggs, individually, beating between each addition. Add 2 teaspoons vanilla extract and a pinch of salt; then stir in about 3 ounces whole or coarsely chopped walnuts. Pour the filling into a chilled 9-inch pâte sucré shell. Bake in center of 350° oven for about 75 minutes – or until set. Remove and allow to cool to room temperature. Serve warm with lightly whipped cream.

Presumably, you have made the simple French custard tart using walnuts from Perigord Noir and a measure of eau de noix? (I use the Italian liqueur, Nocello.)

Edited by Redsugar, 13 November 2004 - 02:46 PM.

"Dinner is theater. Ah, but dessert is the fireworks!" ~ Paul Bocuse

#35 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 13 November 2004 - 08:25 PM

I have a bourbon pecan pie on right now as one of my monthly specials. We do a tasting every month for the staff and I was running late that day. In my hurry, I accidentally used 2 extra egg yolks per pie and when I served it it was still warm...........everyone thought it was great served warm and the extra eggs seemed to cut the coy sweetness. I'd never had warm pecan pie before but it's now a must. It really made a difference.

#36 Richard Danzey

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Posted 13 November 2004 - 09:30 PM

Hello. I'm a newbie, and just missed getting a Question to Harold McGee before the forum closed. I'm repeating the main questions here since the topic is Pecan Pie. I hope this is not out of order.


I have two questions about making a pecan pie come out a little differently.

First: How do I reduce or even eliminate the custardy quality to the filling, leaving just a rich caramelized syrup like product, instead?

Second: What changes should I make, in ingredients or procedure, to allow the filling to almost solidify, leaving a product that is gummy gooey, almost pull your teeth out of their sockets sticky?

I've had pecan pie with these qualities and prefer it to the conventional outcome, but it was long ago, and I never thought to find out how it was accomplished. Now it's not possible.

Since I don't believe Mr. McGee will be answering these questions, I hope someone here or elsewhere on site can and will. Thanks for your cooperation. Regards...

danz

#37 ruthcooks

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Posted 14 November 2004 - 09:53 PM

Years ago, I read that European bakers combine pecans and walnuts together in recipes and that the result is tastier than using either nut alone. I'd never liked walnuts because of their bitterness, but I tried this and to my surprise it was true. I'd never use any walnuts, however, in any recipe which featured pecans.

I use brown sugar and white syrup rather than dark syrup and white sugar in my pecan pie. I also prefer chopped pecans to whole (easier to cut and eat) and you may be able to get chopped or pieces of pecans cheaper, Lucy. Perhaps you can get almonds cheaper? I have a good recipe for a Toasted Almond-Maple Syrup Pie.
Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

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#38 Pan

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Posted 14 November 2004 - 11:44 PM

Since I don't believe Mr. McGee will be answering these questions, I hope someone here or elsewhere on site can and will.

View Post


He answered your question. Just click on this text to read his reply.

#39 Abra

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Posted 15 November 2004 - 05:40 AM

This is a nice one. It has that same toasted nut/browned butter thing going. And Trader Joes has pecans for a song.


* Exported from MasterCook *

Deer Valley Pecan Pie

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
Butter Crust:
1 1/3 cup flour
1/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup butter
1 large egg yolk
Filling:
1 3/4 cup pecan halves
6 T butter
3 large eggs
2 T flour
1 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1/2 cup maple syrup
1 tsp vanilla


Combine flour and sugar in food processor (or bowl). Whirl in butter cut in small pieces until fine crumbs form. Add in yolk and whirl until dough holds together. Press dough over bottom and sides of 10" tart pan. Bake crust at 300 until pale gold - 25-30 minutes. Let cool.

Toast pecans in a single layer on cookie sheet at 350 until fragrant - about 7 -10 minutes. Cook butter over medium high heat until it begins to brown and have a nutty aroma - 4-5 minutes. Remove from heat. In blender, finely grind 1/4 cup toasted pecans.

In a bowl, beat eggs to blend. Add ground pecans, pecan halves, browned butter, brown sugar, maple syrup, and vanilla. Mix well and pour into baked crust. Bake tart at 350 until center is set when slightly shaken, about 25 minutes. Let cool at least 30 minutes before serving.


Source:
"Deer Valley Resort in Park City, Utah, via Sunset Magazine."

#40 ludja

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Posted 15 November 2004 - 07:55 AM

You might also find some interesting ideas in this thread, What makes a pecan pie Southern? from the Southern Food Culture Forum.

Welcome Bochalla! :smile:
"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#41 thegreatdane

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Posted 17 November 2004 - 06:09 PM

I love pecans, pronounced puh-cahns. The very best are the Texas natives, but they're hard to crack and get at all the meat. I did two cups for a pie and it almost killed my thumbs and forefingers.

Herewith is my families secret recipe, passed down from my Great Grandmother:

Go to the store.

Buy a bottle of Dark Karo Syrup.

There's a recipe on the bottle.

Before you leave the store, get the other ingredients.

Bake the pie crust blind for fifteen minutes before adding the filling.

Enjoy.

Go to dentist.

Repeat.

#42 EliseMF

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Posted 18 November 2004 - 06:51 AM

Happy Thanksgiving to all!
I did the "what is the best pecan pie in the world" thing last year too... little by little, I have been working to replace my mother's 50's-ish holiday standards with new and improved versions-- first thing to go was the marshmallow sweet potato thing, then the string bean casserole.... you all probably know the drill, and have followed the same path as you have... assumed the cooking responsibilities.
Anyway- the rest of the famaily has been most stubborn about 2 things- her stuffing (lets not even discuss that one) and the back of the karo label pecan pie-
which I always founds cloying, but lacking in texture or taste. Well I won them all over with this: I really do believe it is the PERFECT pecan pie:

We happen to keep kosher, and I substitute Earth Balance margarine (no trans fats) for the butter with no dire loss of flavor

http://www.cooksillu...icleid=571#1354

Edited by EliseMF, 18 November 2004 - 08:02 AM.


#43 chefpeon

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Posted 18 November 2004 - 04:21 PM

Ok. So I kitchen tested the recipe submitted above by claire797.

Wow. Wait, maybe I'm not being clear enough.....

WOW!!!

I am MAD about this recipe!

This pecan pie is so good....how good is it, you ask?
It's so good, that.....
A)Even though I hate pecan pie, I can actually eat this....not only that, but I actually enjoy it.
B) My co-worker, who is a chef from Georgia (who better than a Southerner to judge a pecan pie?), decided to bag making her own pies this Thanksgiving and ordered 12 from me!

I'd say that's pretty good.

Other than that, here's my observations about the recipe.

*Browning the butter....fun and easy. I love burning stuff on purpose. :raz:
*When I added the brown sugar, I thought perhaps I had mismeasured, because it was
very stiff. The recipe said to heat it some more til the brown sugar melted a bit....this took a
little while....I didn't want to turn up my flame too high. It helps to stir it, rather than to walk
away from it. Using a whisk is helpful because the butter tends to separate out.
*Even when my brown sugar melted to the point where my mixture was smooth, it was still pretty darn thick, and it was blazingly hot (duh, hot sugar). The recipe said to cool it for about
5 minutes before adding the eggs, but I also feared that if I waited that long it might be TOO cool and thick for me to even incorporate the eggs. At this point I was wondering if:
A) I screwed up somewhere, or
B) this recipe may not work

I feared that adding eggs to something so darn hot might curdle them immediately. I decided
to add the pecans to the mixture first, figuring they would cool down the mixture enough as not
to curdle the eggs.
Well, yeah. That worked....but the thick mixture became even thicker. I truly didn't think the eggs would incorporate at that point, but I figured I should try it anyway....what the heck.
So I added part of the egg mixture to try to thin it down gradually. Then I added the rest, and
stirred furiously......I had some lumps of almost solidified sugar, and tried to work them out the best I could, but I also knew they'd re-melt in the heat of the oven.
I then spooned the mixture into my mini 5 inch pie shells, stuck 'em in the oven and hoped for the best. 35 minutes later I removed from the oven the yummiest pecan pies ever!
Deep dark, caramely, buttery, pecan-y, and sweet, but not overy corn syrup sweet.

My co-workers raved all day, and when I delivered them to the local Co-op where they sell my
little pies, the sales staff tried my samples and three of them bought a pie immediately. Only
9 left for the customers!
I'll find out tomorrow if they sold out......I'm hoping to make a lot more tomorrow!! :smile: :smile: :smile:

#44 chefpeon

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Posted 20 November 2004 - 11:00 AM

Pecan Pie

3/4 cup butter
2 cups light brown sugar, packed
3 eggs
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1 1/2 cups pecan pieces
9 inch unbaked pie shell

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In a large skillet, toast pecans. Remove from skillet.

Add butter to skillet and heat over medium until browned. Reduce heat and stir in brown sugar. Let brown sugar melt a bit and turn off heat. Let cool for about 5 minutes.

In a separate bowl, mix eggs, salt and vanilla. Stir in butter/sugar mixture and pecans. Pour into unbaked pie shell Bake in preheated oven at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.


Help. I love this recipe, but I'm having some problems.
When I first made it, I made the small batch and although I had some difficulties, I stuck it out and it worked wonderfully.
I had to quadruple the batch size yesterday, and the difficulties I had the first time 'round were greatly magnified. The pies came out all right taste wise, but they weren't as perfect as the first time.

Here's the part I'm fuzzy on. After the butter is browned and you add the brown sugar, the mixture is extremely stiff. The recipe says to "let the brown sugar melt a bit". I'm ASSUMING
this means you need to let the sugar melt to the point where the mixture becomes a smooth stirrable consistency? By the time the sugar melts down to that point, the butter separates out, and it's nearly impossible to remix it. Yesterday the batch was so large that I couldn't stir it by hand, and thought I might be able to re-emulsify it by sticking it on the mixer. The mixer didn't re-emulsify it either....rather, I got hard brown sugar lumps in a brown butter sauce. I went ahead and added the egg mixture and pecans anyway, hoping the oven heat would remelt it all into the gooey filling I had the day before.

The pies came out ok, but the tops were dull and cloudy (not gooey-glossy and shiny), and the texture of the pie was stiff and quite grainy.
So, what I want to know is:
A) am I NOT supposed to wait until the sugar melts completely, but just gets a little warm?
B) is the browned butter/brown sugar mixture not supposed to be that stiff in the first place? Is there too much brown sugar? The recipe says "packed" brown sugar....maybe it shouldn't be
packed?
C) Claire797, have you made this before? Am I doin' it wrong?
D) Help me, I gotta work out the bugs before Turkey Day. :wacko:

#45 robyn

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Posted 20 November 2004 - 04:23 PM

In my work, I have generally baked these four Pecan Pie recipes.

A simple, straightforward tart: 4 eggs, 1 cup sugar, pinch salt, 4 oz. melted butter, 12 fl. oz. corn syrup, 2 cups pecans, and 2 tsp vanilla extract.  Using a 9" sweet-pastry shell.

A Louisiana Sweet Potato-Pecan Pie in which 2 eggs are whisked into a syrup,then poured over the filling before baking.  Served w/ a drizzle of caramel sauce and a dollop of whipped cream.

A hedonistic Chocolate-Bourbon Pecan Pie.

And that old faithful – Texas Osgood Pie.

View Post


I'm fond of the sweet potato pie on top/pecan pie on the bottom since the former is usually kind of bland and the latter is too sweet/sticky. This is the filling recipe I use:

Bake 2 medium sweet potatoes in the oven - cool and peel

Combine sweet potatoes and 2 tbsp of butter in mixer. Beat on medium with paddle attachment until smooth. Add 1/2 cup light brown sugar, 2 tbsp maple syrup, 1 tsp pure vanilla extract, 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon, 1/3 tsp salt and pinch of freshly grated nutmeg. Mix until well combined. Add 1 cup half and half, 1 egg and 1 egg yolk. Mix until smooth.

Sprinkle 3 tbsp light brown sugar and 1/2 cup toasted and roughly chopped pecans evenly over bottom of prepared crust. Pour in filling. Make egg wash of 1 egg and 1 tbsp heavy cream and brush over edge of crust.

Bake pie in oven for 30-40 minutes at 375. Cool on wire rack. Serve with whipped cream.

By the way - Costco sells pecans at a great price. They're also on sale at lots of grocery stores here now. Robyn

#46 merrybaker

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Posted 21 November 2004 - 02:59 PM

Instead of brown sugar with light corn syrup, or white sugar with dark corn syrup, I use light brown sugar with dark corn syrup. It has a rich caramel flavor that way.

#47 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 21 November 2004 - 03:26 PM

Annie, this is going to sound pretty weird, but I've gotten brown sugar in the past that wouldn't melt in a pan with butter, period. At the time I was making bananas foster and I was so frustrated I couldn't get it to melt, I had everyone in the kitchen attempt to melt that brown sugar and no one could. Changed the brown sugar and everything worked fine as usual. So before you search too much further you might want to experiment with your br. sugar and check it out compared to another brand.

#48 chefpeon

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Posted 21 November 2004 - 05:07 PM

Annie, this is going to sound pretty weird, but I've gotten brown sugar in the past that wouldn't melt in a pan with butter, period. At the time I was making bananas foster and I was so frustrated I couldn't get it to melt, I had everyone in the kitchen attempt to melt that brown sugar and no one could. Changed the brown sugar and everything worked fine as usual. So before you search too much further you might want to experiment with your br. sugar and check it out compared to another brand.

View Post


Wow, Wendy, that's interesting to hear. I was pretty frustrated waiting for that sugar to melt.
It just wouldn't....I thought I was going crazy. I wonder if there's some additive in certain brands?

#49 JeanneCake

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Posted 21 November 2004 - 06:10 PM

I've had similar experiences when I tried to substitute dark brown sugar for light; sieving the sugar would take too long. Maybe the browned butter doesn't contain enough moisture to sufficiently melt the sugar...

Iwould alter the sequence a little: try mixing the whole eggs and brown sugar, heat to melt the sugar (Maida Heatter has a recipe for California Fruit Bars in which she does this, it takes about 10 minutes) and add the previously browned butter - still warm - and go from there.

I've been using Rose Levy Beranbaum's recipe for pecan tart - calls for cooking yolks, lt brown sugar, butter, heavy cream, dark corn syrup, salt to 160 degrees -enough to melt the butter and sugar, but not hot enough to scramble the yolks. I usually go to 150 so I don't have to strain the mixture. (RLB prefers and recommends Lyle's golden syrup for better flavor - when I had trouble with this the first time I made it - there was a lot of foam on the top of the nuts and it was because I wasn't letting it bake long enough - she told me the Lyle's was far and away better than the dark corn syrup, but I can't get Lyle's in bulk and the price
point for this tart goes way too high with the retail Lyle's ... but I digress, sorry!)

Let us know what happens....

Jeanne

#50 Joni

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Posted 22 November 2004 - 10:10 AM

Happy Thanksgiving to all!
I did the "what is the best pecan pie in the world" thing last year too... little by little, I have been working to replace my mother's 50's-ish holiday standards with new and improved versions-- first thing to go was the marshmallow sweet potato thing, then the string bean casserole.... you all probably know the drill, and have followed the same path as you have... assumed the cooking responsibilities.
Anyway- the rest of the famaily has been most stubborn about 2 things- her stuffing (lets not even discuss that one) and the back of the karo label pecan pie-
which I always founds cloying, but lacking in texture or taste. Well I won them all over with this: I really do believe it is the PERFECT pecan pie:

We happen to keep kosher, and I substitute Earth Balance margarine (no trans fats) for the butter with no dire loss of flavor

http://www.cooksillu...icleid=571#1354

View Post

Elise.,..you don't happen to have the ingredients....this is a payperview site...is it made with corn or lyle syrup?

#51 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 23 November 2004 - 10:46 PM

Joni, it's made with light corn syrup and dark brown sugar.
Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

#52 challah-baker

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Posted 27 November 2004 - 12:56 PM

I have made the Cook's Illustrated recipe, but omitted the corn syrup and substituted 3/4 cup of homemade ginger syrup (chop up 16 oz. of fresh ginger, add to 2 1/2 cups water and 2 1/2 cups sugar. Boil until it reaches 225 degrees) and 1/4 cup Lyle's golden syrup. I have also tried the same substitution in other pecan pie recipies. The ginger and the pecan and the Lyle's go perfectly together. Kind of a ginger-butterscotch-caramel-nut effect....

Edited by challah-baker, 28 November 2004 - 02:27 AM.


#53 Richard Danzey

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Posted 27 November 2004 - 08:57 PM

Hello. I owe an overdue debt of thanks to those who have contributed to this thread. Tomorrow, I will be attempting the first of the 'new generation' of pecan pies<G>. I have collected several ideas and suggestions to improve upon that wonderful old standby. I have enough variables to experiment with for a one pie a year series that lasts the rest of my life. Thanks, everyone...

danz

#54 BrentKulman

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Posted 28 November 2004 - 06:38 AM

Here's a twist for you.

We purchased a heritage turkey this year and the family that raised the birds also happened to sell some desserts. The one we selected was a cranberry pecan pie. It's basically a pecan pie with about a cup of fresh cranberries tossed in the mix.

I was a little skeptical about the combination as I don't like cranberry jelly or sauce with my turkey, but the combination of the tart cranberries in an otherwise sweet pie was blissful. I really don't like overly sweet pecan pies so for those of you who do, this combination may not be for you. For me, however, it was a stunner.

Any of you ever tried this combination before?

#55 celenes

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Posted 28 November 2004 - 12:47 PM

I too grew up on pecan pie made using the Karo syrup recipe. But I am positive my granny did a little extra to her version. What it was I can't tell you but I know it was yummy and I have yet to master it.

As for the price of pecans, they are quite expensive here in Ohio. Even from the wholesale places like Sam's Club, GFS etc. But I buy them when I need them. I don't use walnuts too much so I haven't really compared the price.

I think I will try one of the recipes with the butter and brown sugar too. Sounds just like something I shouldn't be eating which is why I must try it.

:wink:
Believe, Laugh, Love
Lydia (aka celenes)

#56 Fernwood

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Posted 02 December 2004 - 09:39 AM

Here's the one I've been using.  It outstanding -- smooth, rich, and sweet but not overly sweet.  It has a deep flavor from the toasted pecans and browned butter. 

Pecan Pie

3/4 cup butter
2 cups light brown sugar, packed
3 eggs
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2  teaspoon vanilla
1 1/2 cups pecan pieces
9 inch unbaked pie shell

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In a large skillet, toast pecans.  Remove from skillet.

Add butter to skillet and heat over medium until browned.  Reduce heat and stir in brown sugar.  Let brown sugar melt a bit and turn off heat.  Let cool for about 5 minutes.

In a separate bowl, mix eggs, salt and vanilla.  Stir in butter/sugar mixture and pecans.  Pour into unbaked pie shell Bake in preheated oven at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.

View Post

I made a pie based on this recipe for Thanksgiving. I did take some liberties, including using 1 tsp vanilla and 1/2 tsp salt. I had a bag of muscovado brown sugar from Trader Joe's (maybe Billington's brand?); some of it went for the pumpkin pies, but the pecan got one cup fancy sugar and one cup Domino. The fancy sugar had a finer texture than Domino and a delicious flavor! I overbaked the pie due to the distraction of inlaws arriving right when the timer went off (I hate it when family expects me to care about them when I'm BAKING :biggrin: ). Also, my oven was acting strange, just in time for T-giving :angry: , which didn't help. The crust had actually been blind baked, so it was quite a deep brown by the time the pie finally came out. I think the overbaking caused some crystallization just under the nuts, but the flavor was fabulous!

[from chefpeon]
... Here's the part I'm fuzzy on. After the butter is browned and you add the brown sugar, the mixture is extremely stiff. The recipe says to "let the brown sugar melt a bit". I'm ASSUMING
this means you need to let the sugar melt to the point where the mixture becomes a smooth stirrable consistency? By the time the sugar melts down to that point, the butter separates out, and it's nearly impossible to remix it. Yesterday the batch was so large that I couldn't stir it by hand, and thought I might be able to re-emulsify it by sticking it on the mixer. The mixer didn't re-emulsify it either....rather, I got hard brown sugar lumps in a brown butter sauce. I went ahead and added the egg mixture and pecans anyway, hoping the oven heat would remelt it all into the gooey filling I had the day before.

The pies came out ok, but the tops were dull and cloudy (not gooey-glossy and shiny), and the texture of the pie was stiff and quite grainy.
So, what I want to know is:
A) am I NOT supposed to wait until the sugar melts completely, but just gets a little warm?
B) is the browned butter/brown sugar mixture not supposed to be that stiff in the first place? Is there too much brown sugar? The recipe says "packed" brown sugar....maybe it shouldn't be
packed?...

I think the word "melt" may be a little misleading here. I don't think it's necessary for the sugar to truly melt and indeed, the brown butter does not have residual moisture to dissolve it. I found that a relatively brief heating softened the sugar-in-butter, though it was still granular. The sugar didn't dissolve until the eggs were added, but that seemed to work just fine.

Anyway, I think this recipe is a winner. Thanks, Claire, for posting it. I am looking forward to trying this again with all muscovado sugar and better attention to the endpoint. I just need to find an audience that can tolerate yet another carb blast; my household is still working on Turkey Day leftovers.
Fern

#57 claire797

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Posted 04 December 2004 - 06:19 PM

Wow! I'm just now checking the thread (don't know why it's taken me so long) and am very happy to hear that a few of you have tried the pie recipe I posted.

Fern, thanks for all your suggestions. I'll try upping the vanilla, but will probably keep the salt the same since I generally use salted butter in my pecan pie. I'm guessing you're an unsalted butter user.

Chefpeon, I hope Fern answered your questions. Her answer is pretty much what I would have said. When I said "let the sugar melt a bit" I just meant let it sit there and kind of dissolve a little before adding the eggs. I put that in the directions because that's the way I've always done it. However, if Fern says you don't have to, then I guess you don't have to. What you would NOT want to do is keep stirring the sugar/butter mixture over low heat....which is probably why my wording is confusing :wacko:.

#58 chefpeon

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Posted 04 December 2004 - 06:54 PM

When I said "let the sugar melt a bit" I just meant let it sit there and kind of dissolve a little before adding the eggs.


Ok, I'm clear now....that's what I wanted to know.
I was trying to cook the sugar down to liquid.......yipes!

I'm glad I don't have to do that!

Thanks a lot!! :wub:

#59 Richard Danzey

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Posted 04 December 2004 - 07:31 PM

Well I made my first try at a 'new' pecan pie. I used the Deer Valley Pecan Pie recipe from *MasterCook*, with some modifications. Good but not what I’m after. Reduced eggs from 3 to 2 in the filling. Used Pillsbury prepared pie crust, not scratch made. Daubed it with extra butter before first baking, and that came out well.

I tried toasting pecans in a skillet. That didn’t work so well. I got them too hot and burned them a little. The recipe uses no Karo syrup. Has brown sugar and maple syrup. I was trying to get a gummy gooey sticky, almost one step below ‘hard candy’ stiff caramelized filling with the pecans ‘lodged’ in the sticky. What I got was a liquid super sweet amalgam of brown sugar and maple syrup, which, while brown enough, didn’t get thick and sticky. Also, it was missing the ‘molasses’ like flavor a pecan pie needs. I also need to use less vanilla--½ t instead of 1--and add a little salt, which though not on the recipe, I intended to add, but forgot to do. I think I might need to mix the brown sugar and maple syrup and cook them like candy to the temp--whatever it is--where it turns gummy and then mix in the rest of the ingredients and bake. That's a guess.

When I browned the butter, I could have done it a bit longer, and or used 5 heat setting instead of 4.5. We had unsalted butter, and I think that was a mistake too. I could have left the pie in to bake a little longer, as the filling was liquid and runny--partly because of fewer eggs--but the crust was getting very brown around the edges and I was reluctant to leave it in any longer. I followed the temp recommendations (350), but may want a higher temp for final baking next time--not sure. Depends on if that will get me a thicker sticky gooey filling or not.

At least the first serious attempt was better than edible. It just wasn’t what I was after… Awhile after eating the inaugural piece of pie, my B/G was 268!!! Put into the fridge, a cooler pie was much more gooey than at room temp and quite a bit closer to what I was looking for. However, pecans were mildly burned in toasting attempt, and flavor of Karo syrup was missing. Maple syrup was not much of a boost. Need to experiment with toasting pecans, and with making filling stickier.

Quite an adventure for a semi-senile old man! I'm looking forward to the next attempt, already. Thanks for this wonderful thread.

danz

#60 Wendy DeBord

Wendy DeBord
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Posted 04 December 2004 - 10:28 PM

Hum............I'm wondering if what you want isn't a completely different recipe, not a classic pecan pie recipe. What about a pecan tassie recipe where it's mainly brown sugar and eggs................or a stove top cooked caramel poured and chilled in a pie shell?





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