Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Red Velvet Cake

Dessert

  • Please log in to reply
178 replies to this topic

#31 Wendy DeBord

Wendy DeBord
  • legacy participant
  • 3,653 posts

Posted 12 March 2005 - 07:09 AM

The recipe at Leites is exactly what I use too, from a family recipe. One tip I'll give you is to make darn sure you don't over bake this cake. It's not a naturally moist cake on it's own. Also, don't expect it to taste chocolatey, it's a rather plain tasting cake.

I'm not from the South (mid-west) but in our families tradition a red cake has that cooked frosting recipe at Leites, not a cream cheese based frosting. Although I have seen many others that swear by the cream cheese frosting. So there is a little confusion over what's "correct".

Good Luck, I'm sure if you follow that recipe your cake will be just what your looking for.

#32 Jaymes

Jaymes
  • participating member
  • 7,349 posts
  • Location:Houston, Texas

Posted 12 March 2005 - 09:14 AM

There have been at least three previous threads here on eGullet where Red Velvet Cake is discussed extensively, with many recipes (including mine), the pros and cons of each, opinions regarding various types of icings, etc.

This is one of those threads: Classic Cakes That Need Resurrecting

Here's another: Need Red Velvet wedding cake

And here's a third: Red Velvet HELP!!


There's lots and lots of great information in those threads. I can't imagine you'd have a question that isn't answered somewhere there. And you'll have your choice of many recipes, all of them tested and tasted and tried and true.

Edited by Jaymes, 12 March 2005 - 07:52 PM.


#33 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,342 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 12 March 2005 - 09:46 AM

This is a very old family recipe which gets raves, hope it is what you want.

RED VELVET CAKE

It is very important to follow the directions exactly. Note there is no baking powder in this cake. The action of the acids and alkaline ingredients mixed in the proper order is what leavens this cake.

You must start with all ingredients at room temperature so set the eggs out and measure out the buttermilk at least an hour before you plan to start mixing.

2-1/2 cups all purpose flour (you can also use 1/2 all purpose and 1/2 cake flour for a finer texture)
1/2 cup Crisco (This is important for the texture)
2 large eggs - room temp.
1 level teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
2 rounded Tablespoons cocoa (regular, not Dutch process)
1 cup buttermilk - room temp.
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 Tablespoon distilled white vinegar
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
2 ounces (1/4 cup)red food coloring

First grease and flour 2 9-inch cake pans - or line with bakers parchment. You can also use a large rectangular pan.

In a large mixing bowl cream the shortening, sugar and vanilla, beat till fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, beating each until completely incorporated into the batter, set aside

In a cup mix together the cocoa, food coloring and vinegar and set aside.

In a medium bowl mix together the buttermilk, flour, baking soda and the salt and set aside.

Turn oven on, set at 350 degrees F.

Add cocoa mix to shortening/sugar/vanilla, blend. Add buttermilk, flour, baking soda, salt to the batter and blend until batter is completely smooth and looks silky.

Pour batter into the cake pans, Bake for 40 minutes, test with a cake tester, if it still appears moist, bake an additional 5 minutes.

ICING

1 cup whole milk
5 Tablespoons flour
2 sticks salted butter
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 cup granulated sugar.

Cook milk and flour until thick in double boiler ( or in a heatproof bowl over a pot of simmering water) Set aside to cool. In a medium mixing bowl cream butter and sugar together until fluffy.

Add vanilla and blend. Add milk and flour mixture and beat until completely blended and icing will hold a peak

Edited by andiesenji, 12 March 2005 - 09:47 AM.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#34 DiH

DiH
  • participating member
  • 186 posts
  • Location:Dallas, Texas

Posted 12 March 2005 - 10:08 AM

For anyone sensitive to the trace bitterness caused by the red food coloring, I replace it with a "healthy teaspoon" of gel coloring... no bitterness and a very pretty color.


Di

#35 M. Lucia

M. Lucia
  • participating member
  • 580 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 12 March 2005 - 11:07 AM

Just wanted to note that Andie's recipe is the same as the one linked above. I love red velvet cake, and I also agree its easy to over bake and have it dry out.

#36 zilla369

zilla369
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 1,244 posts
  • Location:Louisville, KY

Posted 12 March 2005 - 07:36 PM

Okay...i'm finally going to ask this question; it's been bugging me for a long time. I'm sure the answer is absurdly simple, so lay it on me:

Why do most red velvet cake recipes call for vinegar? It's never enough to impart any taste, so i'm assuming it's a chemical reaction thing, but why only in red velvet cake and not other chocolate cakes?

Apologies if this has been covered before. I searched and couldn't find the answer on site.
Marsha Lynch aka "zilla369"

Has anyone ever actually seen a bandit making out?

Uh-huh: just as I thought. Stereotyping.

#37 Jaymes

Jaymes
  • participating member
  • 7,349 posts
  • Location:Houston, Texas

Posted 12 March 2005 - 07:47 PM

Why do most red velvet cake recipes call for vinegar?  It's never enough to impart any taste, so i'm assuming it's a chemical reaction thing, but why only in red velvet cake and not other chocolate cakes?


I'm no food chemist and obviously could be wrong, but most of the recipes I've seen call for 1 T vinegar and 1 C buttermilk, which is definitely enough to impart the slight tang that is one of the hallmarks of the cake. It's not enough to make it sour, but I think you can definitely taste it, along with the hint of chocolate.

Perhaps there is another reason, but that's why I've always assumed the vinegar is in there.

#38 debler

debler
  • participating member
  • 50 posts

Posted 12 March 2005 - 09:03 PM

I was amazzed to see you all discussing Red Velvet Cake!
I was brought up to belive it was indiginous to Canada!
If any of you know of the old Eaton's stores up here, then you would remember it (many, many) years ago , it was one of their signature pastries.
I do have thier origional recipe, it's simulare to the one writen out in this thread. If you'd like it, just PM me.

#39 Jaymes

Jaymes
  • participating member
  • 7,349 posts
  • Location:Houston, Texas

Posted 12 March 2005 - 09:16 PM

I was amazzed  to see you all discussing Red Velvet Cake!
I was brought up to belive it was indiginous to Canada!


I was always told that it originated in New York in the dining room of the Waldorf Astoria Hotel sometime in the 1920's.

But that home cooks in the American South latched onto it with particular enthusiasm and made it their own. It is a particularly festive dessert to carry to church suppers and various other potlucks. You know how we do.

So I think of it as a Southern Thang, even though it probably didn't originate here.

Edited by Jaymes, 12 March 2005 - 09:21 PM.


#40 Daniel

Daniel
  • legacy participant
  • 4,513 posts
  • Location:Manhattan

Posted 28 March 2005 - 09:36 AM

Thanks for your help everyone.. Brought it to Easter.. It turned out really well.. I made a coconut cake too that was outrageous. But this cake looked really pretty.. I am glad i only used two cakes and left the third cake out..

Posted Image

#41 Joni

Joni
  • participating member
  • 220 posts

Posted 28 March 2005 - 02:05 PM

Thanks for your help everyone.. Brought it to Easter.. It turned out really well.. I made a coconut cake too that was outrageous.  But this cake looked really pretty.. I am glad i only used two cakes and left the third cake out..

Posted Image

View Post


Daniel..looks gorgeous..per the other thread...what coconut cake recipe did you use ?

#42 Daniel

Daniel
  • legacy participant
  • 4,513 posts
  • Location:Manhattan

Posted 29 March 2005 - 08:18 AM

Thanks for your help everyone.. Brought it to Easter.. It turned out really well.. I made a coconut cake too that was outrageous.  But this cake looked really pretty.. I am glad i only used two cakes and left the third cake out..

Posted Image

View Post


Daniel..looks gorgeous..per the other thread...what coconut cake recipe did you use ?

View Post


Thanks to the gifted gourmet : coconut recipe

#43 alacarte

alacarte
  • participating member
  • 2,234 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 29 March 2005 - 08:41 AM

Did anyone else know that Duncan Hines offers a red velvet cake mix? Yikes. :blink:

#44 BROWNSUGA

BROWNSUGA
  • participating member
  • 119 posts

Posted 31 March 2005 - 07:48 AM

Daniel, which Red Velvet recipe did you end up making?

#45 Daniel

Daniel
  • legacy participant
  • 4,513 posts
  • Location:Manhattan

Posted 31 March 2005 - 06:29 PM

Daniel, which Red Velvet recipe did you end up making?

View Post



I used the recipe Sarah O provided..My original plan was to make a red velvet with cream cheese icing ,but after seeing that coconut recipe i thought it would be an overkill with two cream cheese icings.. I also only made two cakes instead of three to stack on top of eachother.. With the left over batter i made cupcakes for the kids that were going to be there.

Edited by Daniel, 31 March 2005 - 06:30 PM.


#46 racheld

racheld
  • participating member
  • 2,677 posts
  • Location:Tawandaland

Posted 31 March 2005 - 10:44 PM

Red Velvet Cake---cream cheese frosting with chopped PECANS in it.

Dear Daughter commissioned a pastry chef friend to make one for our Easter lunch (10 at table). It was a marvel of four layers (2 splits) of moist, deeply red cake with creamy, tangysweet frosting. He had levelcut the layers while still in the pans, crumbled the shavings, made dust of the crumbs, toasted them, then used them to hand-apply lovely scallops up the sides. Eight fluffy rosettes graced the top, almost too high to fit under the cake dome.

We cut it early, as some of the friends arrived in town on Friday; after our grilled steaks and portas, many avid glances went toward the gorgeous cake, so we said what the heck, and cut it. After seeing the split layers with frosting as thick as the cake, I served medium-thin slices, which were oh, so rich and filling.

Then we offered a choice of red velvet or lemon cheesecake after Easter lunch. NO ONE turned down the red velvet, though several opted for a "little of both," as is usually the case at dessert time. Above DD requested four slices to take to work, as they had seen it in all its pristine glory as it was delivered.

After all that slicing and serving, one double-slice was still standing when we all retired for the night; during the late hours, that valiant cake gave up the ghost, and was collapsed into a heap of mingled colors when we rose in the morning. We made espresso, gathered round with small forks, lifted the lid one last time. Three bites each, a few careful scrapes of the icing smears, and we bade farewell to an old southern tradition, beautifully done by a Hoosier from a Mississippi recipe.

And do you know what he had said to her when he delivered it? "I've got 17.50 in the ingredients---would $25.00 be too much?" She insisted on at least doubling the ingredient cost, and well worth it, it was...I think we counted 24 servings. Lovely cake.
Fairy tea has its own magic, for it never does run out;
And the flavour you imagine will come streaming from the spout.
Fairy Tea

My Blog--Thanksgiving and Goodwill

LAWN TEA

#47 mignardise

mignardise
  • participating member
  • 126 posts

Posted 11 September 2005 - 03:47 PM

Did a search here on a couple of threads, came up short.
There was a mention here about the use of red powdered color, could not find that thread..........anyways............

I have used paste...with an epicurious recipe..taste pretty good, but my tongue was red for days. Yes, I know I can use less.......

But, my question is:
What's the best type of red to use?
Paste, liquid, gel color, or powder

Calls for 2 oz.
2 oz. of what? what kind?

I know it's so artificial...........and I don't want to fool around with beets.

Thanks.

#48 chefpeon

chefpeon
  • participating member
  • 1,796 posts
  • Location:Tinytown, WA, USA

Posted 11 September 2005 - 04:51 PM

Well, I was gonna say use the beets......but.....I guess not.

I refuse to make red velvet if I can't use the beet juice. All that artificial red color just wigs me out.

But, since you're not wigged out.....

I'm pretty sure the recipe calls for 2 oz of liquid, since that is the kind that is most readily available to everyone. Remember, the red color is just there for color and nothing else, so if you use less, it won't affect the overall quality of your cake.

If you use paste you won't need nearly two ounces......maybe a teaspoon or so?

Personally if I were going to use an artificial red, I'd use the powder. It's fairly concentrated, and really quite tasteless. You might need about 2 tsp of that. I'm just guessing though.

Gel color isn't nearly as concentrated as paste, but it's more concentrated than liquid, so the amount would probably be somewhere in the middle of the paste and the liquid.

Hope this helps!

:smile:

#49 ChocoChris

ChocoChris
  • participating member
  • 151 posts

Posted 11 September 2005 - 05:39 PM

Hi,
I am making a red velvet week cake this week. When I did a practice run, I followed the advice in one of the threads and used a "healthy teaspoon" of red paste (Wilton's no-taste red to be exact) and diluted it in enough water to make 2 oz. of coloring like the recipe called for. I was skeptical but it worked! The color was fine - the bride approved - and no red residue on anyone's tongues!

Hopefully this will help!
Take care,
Chris

Edited by ChocoChris, 11 September 2005 - 05:40 PM.


#50 Kathyf

Kathyf
  • participating member
  • 26 posts
  • Location:Iowa

Posted 11 September 2005 - 08:48 PM

The original recipe I have calls for 2 oz of the liquid red you can find in almost any grocery store. The Wilton red no taste in water that Chris mentioned has worked well for me too. Or 2 ozs. of red airbrush coloring.

#51 onehsancare

onehsancare
  • participating member
  • 246 posts
  • Location:Eugene, Oregon

Posted 12 September 2005 - 08:03 AM

I've never had red velvet cake. Other than the novelty of a red cake, what does it bring to the table?
Life is short. Eat the roasted cauliflower first.

#52 Wendy DeBord

Wendy DeBord
  • legacy participant
  • 3,653 posts

Posted 12 September 2005 - 08:32 AM

I've never had a red cake that I thought was a 'great' cake. The taste is very mild chocolate (almost hard to detect), the texture is not real moist. It's rather plain, nothing that knocks your socks off.

I'd guess that explains why it's not a hugely popular cake from coast to coast. This is my husbands favorite cake, why I'm not certain...........but it's something Grandma and Mom would always bake for his b-day. Maybe it's the combination of the frosting that isn't too sweet or rich with a simple cake that appeals to people.........

#53 Daniel

Daniel
  • legacy participant
  • 4,513 posts
  • Location:Manhattan

Posted 12 September 2005 - 08:50 AM

I was asking about this cake a few months ago.. I made a pretty good one using the red food coloring..

I was surprised to hear all the stories from people who thought that this was only popular in their region.. Its the official cake of Guam.. Its popular in Canada, Ohio, and through out the South.. These are just some of the places I heard about..

Here is a link to a recipe..

recipe

Edited by Daniel, 12 September 2005 - 08:57 AM.


#54 chefcyn

chefcyn
  • participating member
  • 144 posts
  • Location:Northeast, CT

Posted 12 September 2005 - 12:44 PM

Does anyone have an idea of when the first Red Velvet Cake recipe was published? or whatever it's called--how far back does it go in history?

I have a vague idea about some reddish chocolate cake that got it's redness from the cocoa powder reacting with some other ingredient--something like non-alkalized cocoa being more "red" and either more acid added or something to make the cake redder than the usual chocolate cake. (Maybe I'm mixing it up with Devil's Food Cake?)

Any thoughts?
It's not the destination, but the journey!

#55 DiH

DiH
  • participating member
  • 186 posts
  • Location:Dallas, Texas

Posted 12 September 2005 - 01:45 PM

Does anyone have an idea of when the first Red Velvet Cake recipe was published? or whatever it's called--how far back does it go in history? 

I have a vague idea about some reddish chocolate cake that got it's redness from the cocoa powder reacting with some other ingredient--something like non-alkalized cocoa being more "red" and either more acid added or something to make the cake redder than the usual chocolate cake. (Maybe I'm mixing it up with Devil's Food Cake?)

Any thoughts?

View Post


Clicky Here...


Di

#56 Steven Blaski

Steven Blaski
  • participating member
  • 155 posts

Posted 12 September 2005 - 01:54 PM

Does anyone have an idea of when the first Red Velvet Cake recipe was published? or whatever it's called--how far back does it go in history? 

I have a vague idea about some reddish chocolate cake that got it's redness from the cocoa powder reacting with some other ingredient--something like non-alkalized cocoa being more "red" and either more acid added or something to make the cake redder than the usual chocolate cake. (Maybe I'm mixing it up with Devil's Food Cake?)

Any thoughts?

View Post


According to the following recipe, which discusses the cake's origins and related info at some length, the dessert originated at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel:

http://www.texascook...99redvelvet.htm

BTW, this recipe for Red Velvet Cake is excellent. I made it for a couple of southerners a few months ago who asked for the cake, which I'd never heard of. I did some research and compared various versions and settled on this one. I was rather appalled at adding so much red dye (safe though it may be), but the resulting cake was delicious and rather stunning when cut into - the deep red set off by the white. Kitschy but pretty.

#57 mignardise

mignardise
  • participating member
  • 126 posts

Posted 13 September 2005 - 10:23 AM

Thanks everyone for the replies.

#58 celenes

celenes
  • participating member
  • 140 posts
  • Location:Cleveland, Ohio

Posted 21 October 2005 - 11:52 AM

Hi,

I have received a request from a client to make a full sheet red velvet cake and a half sheet cake and they want it pre-cliced in generous pieces with a strawberry on each slice and they also want some strawberry puree to drizzle on the top if desired.

First of how do I cut the cake without make a horrific mess of the whole thing? :sad:

I hate to put in a lot of work in decorating the cake only to screw it up be pre-slicing. :angry:

I don't have any of the gadgets either that I been researching this week to equally divide the cake is this something I should invest in? I recommended to the client that perhaps I make mini cakes and put them in the decorative foil petite holders but apparently my price is too much for that. I didn't think it was expensive but the client did.

HELP.
Believe, Laugh, Love
Lydia (aka celenes)

#59 Badiane

Badiane
  • participating member
  • 661 posts
  • Location:Chilliwack, BC

Posted 21 October 2005 - 11:58 AM

Are they having someone serve the cake? You could make it, ice it, freeze it and slice it frozen then let it thaw...that would give you neat edges.

Are they throwing them on a table for people to help themselves? If they are amenable to this suggestion it might work better if that is the scenario...make the cake and cut it up, then just pipe a frosting swirl on each square and garnish with a strawberry. That way each individual dessert will look nice on the plate.
Don't try to win over the haters. You're not the jackass whisperer."

Scott Stratten

#60 Trishiad

Trishiad
  • participating member
  • 544 posts
  • Location:sebastopol, ca

Posted 21 October 2005 - 12:12 PM

Sooooo they want cupcakes ?





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Dessert