Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Exotic Orange Cake

Dessert

  • Please log in to reply
117 replies to this topic

#91 gus_tatory

gus_tatory
  • participating member
  • 967 posts

Posted 13 August 2006 - 12:32 PM

Or you can go to:
http://www.onlineconversion.com/
It's easier than doing the math.

View Post


...or you can go to google, and type in the Search bar "(xx) ounces in grams", where (xx) is the amount you need to convert. or vice versa.

if this is your first time using this feature, note that it works for currencies, Imperial --> Metric, distances, as well...
"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."
--Isak Dinesen

#92 FWED

FWED
  • participating member
  • 250 posts
  • Location:Snohomish Wa

Posted 13 August 2006 - 04:54 PM

I recently decided to try something different with the exotic orange cake by making it in an individual serving size. I recently bought an oval savarins mold made by Demarle. I used the original recipe but limited the cake to just one layer in the finished mini cake. I used the original amount of cream but increased the orange oil to one and one half teaspoons and added the zest of 4 oranges instead of 3 to intensify the orange flavor in the Bavaroise layer. The recipe made 20 of these mini cakes. It worked out very well and was a hit when I served to friends. Demarle has a web site at www.demarleusa.com.

Here are some photos of the mini’s. The mini cakes are on 4 inch gold disks so that will give you an idea of the size of them.

Posted Image


Posted Image

Posted Image

Fred Rowe

#93 Abra

Abra
  • participating member
  • 3,186 posts
  • Location:Bainbridge Island, WA

Posted 14 August 2006 - 06:01 AM

I want to add my vote for doing this cake in mini format. The extra sprayed surface gave a crisp edge in practically every bite that was just wonderful, and the additional orange was a good enhancement. Here's the finished presentation

Posted Image

Beautiful and delicious. Thank you, FWED!

#94 K8memphis

K8memphis
  • participating member
  • 2,464 posts
  • Location:memphis tn

Posted 14 August 2006 - 06:59 AM

I gotta get a sprayer--those are amazing. And orange oil in the bavaroise--I missed that part somewhere.

Umm, y'all are sure the Wagner paint sprayer is food safe??? Is there a comparably priced food one?? Probably not...?

Here's one for $369.

$266

Hmm, then we go into the full size stand alone model$. Geez that fifty dollar Wagner is looking better and better--but what about the food safety issue??

Edited by K8memphis, 14 August 2006 - 07:09 AM.


#95 alanamoana

alanamoana
  • participating member
  • 2,738 posts
  • Location:California

Posted 14 August 2006 - 07:33 AM

k8, if you buy the wagner brand new and don't use it for anything but chocolate, you'll be fine. there are very few moving parts, all of which can be washed before first use. that's the main sprayer you'll find in many restaurants if they do any spraying.

#96 Patrick S

Patrick S
  • participating member
  • 2,233 posts

Posted 14 August 2006 - 09:16 AM

Cool. The cakes look very attractive in mini savarin shapes.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#97 ohev'ochel

ohev'ochel
  • participating member
  • 68 posts
  • Location:Montreal, Quebec -- CANADA

Posted 14 August 2006 - 09:38 AM

I second Patrick S's comment.

They look very sophisticated in that format. Additionally, I imagine they are easier to handle/serve than when made in a large cake. Either way, I am sure they taste fantastic. Good work! :wink:

#98 gfron1

gfron1
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,361 posts
  • Location:Silver City, NM

Posted 14 August 2006 - 04:15 PM

Absolutely beautiful. Most of us who've posted in this thread stopped short of the white chocolate spray at the end. Thanks for doing it right!

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#99 Ling

Ling
  • participating member
  • 4,946 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 14 August 2006 - 04:20 PM

I was the lucky recipient of one of FWED's mini Exotics! It was delicious! :wub:

#100 duckduck

duckduck
  • participating member
  • 946 posts
  • Location:portland, oregon

Posted 16 August 2006 - 12:47 PM

Those turned out really nice Fwed! Now I can't wait to try them out with my square petit four demarle pan. The ovals were a very nice choice.
Pamela Wilkinson
www.portlandfood.org
Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

#101 oli

oli
  • participating member
  • 257 posts

Posted 17 August 2006 - 02:48 PM

FWED, do you have a picture of the cake with the mandarin oranges you used for decoration? I am curious what that looked like.
Did everbody who made this cake have little black specks from the vanilla bean, in their gelee, or did someone find a way to remove vanilla bean specks?

Edited by oli, 17 August 2006 - 02:58 PM.


#102 alanamoana

alanamoana
  • participating member
  • 2,738 posts
  • Location:California

Posted 18 August 2006 - 08:52 AM

why would you want to remove the vanilla bean specks?

if you don't like them, use vanilla extract.

#103 chefpeon

chefpeon
  • participating member
  • 1,796 posts
  • Location:Tinytown, WA, USA

Posted 18 August 2006 - 11:59 AM

why would you want to remove the vanilla bean specks?


Yeah man....vanilla bean specks are cool!
They say, "Hey, I'm a real vanilla bean, and I'm in this dessert! Neener neener."

#104 oli

oli
  • participating member
  • 257 posts

Posted 18 August 2006 - 12:21 PM

why would you want to remove the vanilla bean specks?


Yeah man....vanilla bean specks are cool!
They say, "Hey, I'm a real vanilla bean, and I'm in this dessert! Neener neener."

View Post

Some people will ask, "what are those black specks?". Doesn't bother me, but I was thinking of a cleaner look.

#105 kaneel

kaneel
  • participating member
  • 177 posts
  • Location:Houston

Posted 24 August 2006 - 07:15 AM

I want to try the cake but cannot use nuts for this customer any of you have a suggestion of another cake base. Would an orange cake be to too much. For the ones that have made the cake what flavor did the caek have ...more orange or mango ? The lady wnats a mango mousse flavored cake and i thought this thread as my starting point :hmmm:

Thanks so much

#106 Tweety69bird

Tweety69bird
  • participating member
  • 462 posts
  • Location:Montreal, QC, Canada

Posted 24 August 2006 - 07:54 AM

I am attempting this cake for the first time and am making the components over a few days. Last night, I made the caramel cremeux layer, it came out quite bitter. I followed the instructions as given. I think that there are 2 steps that may have given me the bitter flavour: either I over caramelized my sugar (it was just a touch over the perfect dark amber colour and didn't smell burnt before I added the cream) or the vanilla that I (silly move) added before putting the yolks in and returning the pot to the heat. I am unsure, and thought that even maybe the fact that I tasted the mixture while it was still quite warm may have enhanced the bitter flavour. It set up quite nicely in the fridge overnight, and I think I might taste a piece of it later on to see if it tastes different now that it's cooled down and set. Any advice?
Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse

#107 Patrick S

Patrick S
  • participating member
  • 2,233 posts

Posted 24 August 2006 - 11:04 AM

I am attempting this cake for the first time and am making the components over a few days. Last night, I made the caramel cremeux layer, it came out quite bitter. I followed the instructions as given. I think that there are 2 steps that may have given me the bitter flavour: either I over caramelized my sugar (it was just a touch over the perfect dark amber colour and didn't smell burnt before I added the cream) or the vanilla that I (silly move) added before putting the yolks in and returning the pot to the heat.

View Post


You slightly overcaramelized the sugar. Cooking the vanilla wouldn't do it. All the sweetness in the cremeux comes from the caramelized sugar (or which there is not much to begin with), and sugar looses its sweetness rapidly as it caramelizes. I already decided that when I make the cremeux next time, I will be replacing some of the cream with syrup to sweeten it up a little.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#108 Tweety69bird

Tweety69bird
  • participating member
  • 462 posts
  • Location:Montreal, QC, Canada

Posted 24 August 2006 - 01:42 PM

You slightly overcaramelized the sugar. Cooking the vanilla wouldn't do it. All the sweetness in the cremeux comes from the caramelized sugar (or which there is not much to begin with), and sugar looses its sweetness rapidly as it caramelizes. I already decided that when I make the cremeux next time, I will be replacing some of the cream with syrup to sweeten it up a little.

View Post


Thanks Patrick, it makes sense. I'm home now, so I'm going to give the one I made a taste to see how it is, but i'm going to remake it regardless. I dont want to regret it later on when it's too late.
Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse

#109 alanamoana

alanamoana
  • participating member
  • 2,738 posts
  • Location:California

Posted 24 August 2006 - 02:36 PM

i think you could easily make this with a plain sponge or genoise and add orange zest to it if you want to boost the flavor.

the nuts and honey certainly add something to the cake, but if they don't know what's missing, it won't matter too much.

I want to try the cake but cannot use nuts for this customer any of you have a suggestion of another cake base. Would an orange cake be to too much. For the ones that have made the cake what flavor did the caek have ...more orange or mango ? The lady wnats a mango mousse flavored cake and i thought this thread as my starting point  :hmmm:

Thanks so much

View Post



#110 Tweety69bird

Tweety69bird
  • participating member
  • 462 posts
  • Location:Montreal, QC, Canada

Posted 09 September 2006 - 01:13 PM

So I finally completed the Exotic Orange Cake!

Here is it, I'm so pleased with how it came out. I took it to work to hand out samples and the reviews were great! As Patrick had mentionned, the vanilla cremeux (which I remade after the bitter version that I wrote about earlier, and this time it was very nice.) is not too sweet at all. I didn't modify the recipe to sweeten it up, as I wanted to taste it first to see, and I'm glad I didn't. The majority of the comments I received were that the cake wasn't too sweet, and that they liked it like that. I couldn't find passionfruit puree anywhere, so I just used mango puree for the gelle layer, and maybe this balanced better with the non sweet cremeux as it didn't have the tart edge of the passionfruit.

I didn't add the white chocolate spray either, but will have to look into how I make some sort of spray tool for that. I have a vague recollection of us doing some sort of class with spray bottles and chocolate/cocoa butter mix in school.

Posted Image

Posted Image
Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse

#111 Ling

Ling
  • participating member
  • 4,946 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 09 September 2006 - 02:10 PM

^Great job! :smile:

I really enjoyed this cake when I had it, and think the combination of flavours are incredible. However, I did find it too sweet and would like to scale back on the sugar when I make it, if possible. Does anyone foresee any problems if I scaled back the sugar by 1/4 or 1/3 the amount?

#112 K8memphis

K8memphis
  • participating member
  • 2,464 posts
  • Location:memphis tn

Posted 09 September 2006 - 03:21 PM

Tweety, it's beauuutiful!!

Ling, the sugar in the which part?? Overall??

#113 Ling

Ling
  • participating member
  • 4,946 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 09 September 2006 - 05:20 PM

Yes, I ate all the components in each bite. It is actually one of the sweeter desserts I had in recent memory, though most of the desserts I eat are from home and made according to my taste. If I were to cut the sugar, which parts of the recipe should I do it? In each and every part? Or in one or two parts? TIA, I do love the cake very much and can't wait to make it soon! :smile:

Edited by Ling, 09 September 2006 - 05:21 PM.


#114 K8memphis

K8memphis
  • participating member
  • 2,464 posts
  • Location:memphis tn

Posted 09 September 2006 - 06:36 PM

I would say, not the sugar in the cremeux. Maybe cut a bit out of the bavaroise. I would say cut a quarter of the sugar in the fruit stuff--no problemo.

Is it the honey flavor that sweetifies too much for you maybe?? There's 135 gr sugar in the cake (60 in the cake and 75 in the meringue) and 60 g honey. Hmm. How 'bout lop off the 35 gr sugar & that leaves 100 gr. So like 40 in the cake and 60 g in the meringue ~~ and maybe cut back on the honey to 40-45 grams. That shouldn't mess anything up too much do you think?

Edited by K8memphis, 09 September 2006 - 06:37 PM.


#115 Ling

Ling
  • participating member
  • 4,946 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA

Posted 09 September 2006 - 06:46 PM

I love the taste of honey, and wonder honey contributes more to the texture of the cake than sugar does..I could be wrong! I usually cut the sugar down in a cake recipe with no ill effects, so perhaps I could just reduce the amount of sugar in the cake, and in the fruit puree, and leave the cremeux and bavaroise as is. Thank-you!

#116 trishg

trishg
  • participating member
  • 3 posts

Posted 10 September 2006 - 04:57 PM

This is a wonderful cake and in reality doesn't take all that long to prepare and can certainly be done over a period of days before its needed.  The cake actually consists of just a sponge, a Bavarian cream, a pastry cream, and a jelly top.  It took me about 45 minutes to assemble the cake once the component's were made.  Spraying it took a little longer since it was the first time that I had used the sprayer or done any chocolate spraying.  Once it is sprayed and unfrozen and thawed however it should be eaten.  Thats not usually a problem.  :laugh:  :laugh:

Abra:   
Yes a 1/2 sheet pan is OK and there probably will be batter left over.  As to spraying well I used a virgin Wagner Paint sprayer (49$ at Home Depot) and 1/2 lb of melted tempered white chocolate and 1/2 lb of melted cocoa butter and 9gm of titanium oxide.  Other options to spraying would be to use thin squares or circles of white chocolate on the outside.  You could even incorporate designs off of transfer sheets. Or you could leave the chocolate off all together although it does have a nice textural component.

Smgarsh:
Yes, I melted 60gm of sugar in a pan and when it reached the desired color I took it off the heat and added the hot cream and vanilla.  As to glucose it is available at most cake decorating and candy supply shops.  I understand it is available at some Micheal's craft stores.  If you choose to use corn syrup you may have to increase the amount of gelatin to get the right consistency.  You want a jelly that just holds its shape and isn't rubbery.

View Post

Hi, Awsome recipe - I can't wait to try it, but what is the purpose of the titanium oxide in the white chocolate spray?

Trish
Trishg
[COLOR=purple]Melbourne, Australia
[FONT=Arial][SIZE=1][COLOR=blue]

#117 K8memphis

K8memphis
  • participating member
  • 2,464 posts
  • Location:memphis tn

Posted 10 September 2006 - 06:10 PM

Hi, Awsome recipe - I can't wait to try it, but what is the purpose of the titanium oxide in the white chocolate spray?

Trish

View Post


I'd venture a guess that it's to whiten the chocolate. White chocolate can be very yellow to very off white.

#118 Tweety69bird

Tweety69bird
  • participating member
  • 462 posts
  • Location:Montreal, QC, Canada

Posted 11 September 2006 - 04:27 AM

^Great job!  :smile:

I really enjoyed this cake when I had it, and think the combination of flavours are incredible. However, I did find it too sweet and would like to scale back on the sugar when I make it, if possible. Does anyone foresee any problems if I scaled back the sugar by 1/4 or 1/3 the amount?

View Post


Thanks!!
I agree with K8, I would leave the cremeux alone, since the small amount of sugar in there is really for the caramel flavour and the end result isn't sweet.
I think you could modify the gelee layer and the bavaroise without any problems at all. And I'm sure if you reduced the sugar in the cake too you'd be ok...
Don't waste your time or time will waste you - Muse





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Dessert