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Exotic Orange Cake

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117 replies to this topic

#61 K8memphis

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 12:03 PM

Well, I wound up with some Queensberry Passion Fruit jelly with seeds and some dried mango. I mean I coulda got some fresh mango I guess. But come to think of it I didn't see any mango while I was out but the dried stuff.

But Tennessee liquor stores only sell products with alcohol in them. Even mixers have 1% alcohol or something weird. So nobody in the state has the frozen stuff.

And so I'm not doing the vanilla beans either--I'll just use the extract. Next time I make this I'll order ahead & get the purees in & do the real vanilla beans.

So I'll hold back on the gelatin for the gelee.

#62 Patrick S

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 12:28 PM

But Tennessee liquor stores only sell products with alcohol in them. Even mixers have 1% alcohol or something weird. So nobody in the state has the frozen stuff.

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Not that this bit of trivia will do you any good, but virtally anything made from fruit will have trace amounts of alcohol in it, as does virtually anything that includes vanilla extract as an ingredient, though the prevailing definition of non-alcoholic beverage is IIRC anything that contains less than 0.5% alcohol.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#63 K8memphis

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 01:30 PM

Yeah, I mean they can't even sell Coke or Pepsi anything.

I just broke my cream anglaise grr. It was perfect a minute ago :rolleyes:

This cake is for Chef-boy who is flying home for a minute. Hope I can pull it off. He'll love me anyway.

I mean where he works is so ooolala ~~ He's talking about the florist at work. I said I never heard of a restaurant that had an on staff florist. He said, "Mom, we've got three." :laugh:

Now I gotta zest three more dang oranges...

#64 K8memphis

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 01:46 PM

A question though. I've figured out that the gelatin is .35 ounce for the cream anglaise part--umm, that is the weight of the powder right?

I bet I need to translate that from sheet gelatin huh?

Isn't there a bit of a conversion from gelatin sheets to powder gelatin?

#65 Patrick S

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 03:24 PM

A question though. I've figured out that the gelatin is .35 ounce for the cream anglaise part--umm, that is the weight of the powder right? 

I bet I need to translate that from sheet gelatin huh?

Isn't there a bit of a conversion from gelatin sheets to powder gelatin?

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You don't need to convert anything. I used powdered gelatin in the amounts specified in the recipe, bloomed in water and melted in the microwave, and nothing turned out under- or overfirm.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#66 K8memphis

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 05:26 PM

Good that's what I've done. Thanks, Patrick.

Now, umm, how does your cremeux taste??? I think I made a big mistake not getting the vanilla beans & using extract instead. Mine is a super light flavor. My husband likes all the different flavors. I imagine when I put them all together it will be fine. I will make this again with real purees and vanilla beans. I really like the honey cake.

#67 K8memphis

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 09:26 PM

I used the cream anglaise formula from Pierre Herme's book. Cook to 180 degrees??? That proved killer for my anglaise. My friends told me that's egg scramble temp.

I mean I had my stuff fine, then I kept stirring to get it the right temp & it broke. So of course the moral of the story is next time I won't use the thermometer. But with all due respect to Dorie and Pierre isn't that a bit hot? How do you keep it from boiling if it gets that hot?

#68 Patrick S

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 05:39 AM

Now, umm, how does your cremeux taste??? I think I made a big mistake not getting the vanilla beans & using extract instead. Mine is a super light flavor.

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The flavor is pretty light even with the vanilla beans, and not very sweet either (only 60g of caramelized sugar to 480g of cream and yolks). My personal preference would be for it to be a bit sweeter, but that is true with a lot of recipes. The flavor of the bavaroise is also light, and I am definitely going to reduce the amount of whipped cream in it if I make it again. The orange anglaise base actually tasted fantastic, it just got a little too diluted in all that whipped cream, IMHO.

Edited by Patrick S, 03 August 2006 - 06:03 AM.

"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#69 Patrick S

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 06:02 AM

I used the cream anglaise formula from Pierre Herme's book. Cook to 180 degrees??? That proved killer for my anglaise. My friends told me that's egg scramble temp. 

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It would be if the yolks were not well-mixed with all that milk and sugar. I've cooked many a custard and curd to 180 with no or almost not scramble.

So of course the moral of the story is next time I won't use the thermometer. But with all due respect to Dorie and Pierre isn't that a bit hot? How do you keep it from boiling if it gets that hot?

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180 is basically the highest of what you would cook an anglaise too, and if you go much past that you will definitely start to scramble the eggs, but 180 itself is not too hot. Of course, you should be stirring constantly as the anglaise heats up, so that the anglaise on the bottom of the pan doesn't curdle before the anglaise on the top even thickens, and if it starts to break, pull it from the heat quickly and keep stirring. As far as how to keep from boiling -- you won't reach a boil until you get to ~212. As you approach your target temperature, you can reduce the heat (keep whisking though) so that the temperature of the anglaise is rising slowly, which will make it easy to get where you want to be without going over.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#70 K8memphis

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 07:21 AM

Cool. My biggest issue is that Chef-boy always snarks my instant read thermometers and I was using a candy thermometer. I just wasn't quick enough and I think I'll read some other cream anglaise directions. I just parked on Pierre's directions and should have had the right equipment.

But umm, my chef-friend says she makes hot chocolate with cream anglaise. Whoa whoa whoa does that not sound amazing?! Something that ultimately decadent would be worth the effort needed to fight off the resulting cellulite. :laugh:

And my other friend said that you can rehabilitate the broken CA in a blender. Then Chef-boy said that's not really a good idea. But if it ever hapens again (breaks) while I'm juggling thermometers, I'm gonna try it.

The 'leaves a clear path on the back of the spoon' method is so much more user friendly.

Edited by K8memphis, 03 August 2006 - 07:22 AM.


#71 alanamoana

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 07:29 AM

temperature is a good guide, but it is more for safety's sake than anything else (pasteurization). cook it until it looks/feels thick. it will continue to thicken as it "ripens" in the ice bath and then under refrigeration.

always have an ice bath prepared to cool your anglaise so that it doesn't continue to cook once you take it off the heat. even a few seconds sitting on the counter can turn a beautiful anglaise into a scrambled mess if you took it to the edge over the heat and then have to "scramble" to get your ice bath together.

burr mixing is a last ditch effort to fix a broken/scrambled anglaise. if you do it, understand that your anglaise won't end up as thick because you've just broken down all the egg protein that has coagulated...and then over-coagulated. just like when you over-scramble eggs, the proteins get so tight, they squeeze all the liquid out and you have a separated mess.

#72 K8memphis

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 08:14 AM

Yep, I had my ice bath ready. It was a little melty waiting for the second batch to get done but still... :raz:

And I'm glad I did all that. It pushes my limits doing stuff like that. Feels good. That honey cake is the bombshabomb~~a great canvas.

#73 K8memphis

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 03:49 PM

Bwoo wah ha ha ha ha!!! It's awesome all put together!!!!

Whooo hooo hooo. The gentle flavors are just the perfect accent with the burst of flavor in the gelee. Perfect perfect summer cake. It is exotic. I was tasting everything and while it was still warm too and it was not working for me. Especially because I'd never had it before. Just baking & making blind. I bet it's even better with the real purees & vanilla beanies. But I did cut back on the whipped cream in the bavaroise like Patrick suggested.

It is totally amazing. ~~clapping hands smilie face~~

Now on the gelee, I warmed then strained the passion fruit jelly. And I simmered a hand full of the dried mango down~~I did de-glaze the pan with a teensly bit of grand marnier--then I pureed the mango with the strained pf jelly and strained it all again. Added the bit of corn syrup and gelatin and vanilla. That stuff is good.

I'd never made bavaroise, or cremeux and never had passion fruit before. Stretched my limits. Way cool.

Thank you all. Hey, it did knock my socks off!!
:laugh:

Edited by K8memphis, 03 August 2006 - 03:55 PM.


#74 Desiderio

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 06:12 PM

Ok silly question be patience please :biggrin:

Make a 8 in by 3/8 inch solid mold. ( I used 2 sheets of foam board cut into 8 inch circles taped together and covered with plastic wrap) This solid mold is centered inside the cake ring on top of the plastic wrap. It will create a space (to be filled later with gelee) in the top of the cake.


Could it be possible to make the gelee into a mold of that size 8 in by 3/8 in, and build the cake around the gele instead using the foam mold ?
I mean if the gelee is firm enough could it work ?

Thank you for this fantastic recipe by the way and for everyone that posted their results , they look faboulous ,its been very long time since I have made one of this type of cakes , I should get my hands back to it though , maybe I ll give this a try .

Thank you.

Edited by Desiderio, 03 August 2006 - 06:13 PM.

Vanessa

#75 K8memphis

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 06:34 PM

Ok silly question be patience please  :biggrin:

Make a 8 in by 3/8 inch solid mold. ( I used 2 sheets of foam board cut into 8 inch circles taped together and covered with plastic wrap) This solid mold is centered inside the cake ring on top of the plastic wrap. It will create a space (to be filled later with gelee) in the top of the cake.


Could it be possible to make the gelee into a mold of that size 8 in by 3/8 in, and build the cake around the gele instead using the foam mold ?
I mean if the gelee is firm enough could it work ?


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But you have the bavaroise to deal with too. Hmm, it's actually very very easy. I used the ring from my springform pan which made it a snap to un-mold. Since I've done it once and it is as easy as it is I would not even try to work it out the other way. I think the surface of the gelee would get marred any other way. But greater minds than mine will answer.

I want to try the heart shaped one.

#76 Desiderio

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 06:42 PM

Thats why I said "silly question" :raz: .Any way I have noticed that Patrick's cake doesnt have any lines /wrinkles on top like the other one posted previously,I suppose the plastic wrap cause the wrinkle and I was wonder how did Patrick manage to get a smooth surface like that.
I will also use a spring form pan I think it would be easyer to deal with .
Vanessa

#77 Desiderio

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Posted 03 August 2006 - 08:27 PM

Ahh never mind that , I have just read all the previus post ( i print the long one cause I didnt have time and I have read them on my break , and ofcourse you can build the cake on layer as I used to do while back ,freezen each layer inside a 8in round pan ,easy enough for me :biggrin: Sorry
Vanessa

#78 FWED

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Posted 05 August 2006 - 10:42 PM

Hi Desiderio. The reason I wrote the recipe as it is, with the gelee layer inserted later, is because the original cake that I made from the original World Pastry Forum class recipe called for the Bavarian cream layer to be sprayed with white chocolate.

The cake is fabricated without the gelee layer and is frozen. It is then taken out of the freezer and sprayed with a mixture of 50% white chocolate and 50% cocoa butter. This gives the outside of the finished cake a velvet finish and provides a little bit of crunch when eating. The gelee is then poured into the reserved space. This makes a very neat, tailored presentation. I personally like the look of the sprayed white chocolate.

If you are not going to spray the outside of the cake then you could make the gelee ahead of time and build the cake around it. Its all a matter of personal taste.

I am presently working on a variation in the presentation of this cake and hope to have some photos of it soon. Fred

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#79 Desiderio

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Posted 05 August 2006 - 10:56 PM

Thank you FWED, I really like the look of the sprayed chocolate it gives the cake a neat look indeed.
This cake is very intriging ( spelling?), and I really want to try it out.

Thank you for posting so many helpfull tips and hints for this gourgeus cake again :smile:
Vanessa

#80 K8memphis

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Posted 06 August 2006 - 01:17 PM

Hey, Fred, one of the coolest things about this cake is how well the almond balances it out into your body. It is certainly every morsel a wonderful treat. But the almond meal keeps it from just being a wild rampant sugar rush. There's calories to have to pay for but worth it.

If I ate brownies or regular cake, I would gain weight. It's my wonky metabolism. Your cake with the protein, did not cause me to gain weight though I ate a coupla slices a day for several days.

Looking forward to the update you're working on. And I'm looking forward to making again with all the right ingredients.

:biggrin:

The only thing I didn't try was the choco spraying--I should try that...

#81 oli

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 07:02 PM

I am going to make this for our department party and I was wondering if anybody have trouble getting exact egg yolk and egg white weights. I find the eggs are slightly more than the recommended weights.

Edited by oli, 08 August 2006 - 08:01 PM.


#82 K8memphis

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 07:22 PM

Yeah sure, you just take out a bit to get it on target.

Patrick advised using less whipped cream in the bavaroise--good idea and it's possible next time I will add more sugar for the caramel part called cremeux.

Everytime I say bavaroise I picture Desi Arnaz yodeling BABALOO and banging on the bongo drums :laugh:

How do you pronounce bavaroise and cremeux??

Oli, did you locate the passion fruit??

#83 oli

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 08:15 PM

Wow, you remembered my problem. I impressed, because I am not a big poster more of a lurker. Don't get me wrong I am just a lurker here, but not in real life. Well, anyway, I have someone from my department whose family lives in S.F., and when she went for a visit and a side trip to the CIA, I asked if she wouldn't mind stopping in at Dean & Deluca. I had called Purfect Puree and they don't sell to walkins, but Dean & Deluca were the only people in Napa that carried it. There is another place in Culver City that carries Purfect Puree but when I was there they didn't have passion fruit.
Here's a question. When I received the product I noticed that the container says Passion Fruit concentrate, so I am wondering if I should just keep adding concentrate until the gelee tastes right, according to my palate?
I pronounce, bavaroise, as: bavaros

Edited by oli, 08 August 2006 - 08:15 PM.


#84 Abra

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 08:33 PM

It's bah-var-waz, with a slight emphasis on the last syllable.

Cremeux is harder to explain. It's crehm----the eux has no exact equivalent in English. In fact, I can't think of a single example - help me out here, someone!

#85 John DePaula

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 09:38 PM

It's bah-var-waz, with a slight emphasis on the last syllable.

Cremeux is harder to explain.  It's crehm----the eux has no exact equivalent in English.  In fact, I can't think of a single example - help me out here, someone!

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How about: crehm-yuh .
John DePaula
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#86 alanamoana

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 09:44 PM

creh-mooooo

edited to add: i am kidding... :huh:

Edited by alanamoana, 08 August 2006 - 09:44 PM.


#87 Abra

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Posted 08 August 2006 - 10:09 PM

Nope, no y sound in there, no oooo either. The sound doesn't exist in English, I'm pretty sure. Don't we have some new audio capacity here? I could record it.

Wait, listen here! audio file Baveux is the word we'd use for "runny" as in "I'd like my omelette runny." The eux sound is the same as in cremeux.

#88 Patrick S

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Posted 09 August 2006 - 09:36 AM

I am going to make this for our department party and I was wondering if anybody have trouble getting exact egg yolk and egg white weights. I find the eggs are slightly more than the recommended weights.

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No problem. I weigh out my yolks and whites in disposable cups. If I need 8.5 yolks, I put in 9, and then take some out.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#89 oli

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Posted 12 August 2006 - 07:59 PM

I am going to make this for our department party and I was wondering if anybody have trouble getting exact egg yolk and egg white weights. I find the eggs are slightly more than the recommended weights.

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No problem. I weigh out my yolks and whites in disposable cups. If I need 8.5 yolks, I put in 9, and then take some out.

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What do you think of this product, and would you think it would work in this cake? It is available at Whole Food Markets, so I wouldn't haveto mail order
From their website: Goya.com

Fruit Pulps
In several delicious tropical varieties like Passion Fruit, Papaya, Mango and Tamarind, these frozen fruit pulps are 100% natural, low in fat, high in Vitamin C, and cholesterol free. Used in smoothies and frozen desserts, Goya Fruit Pulps are the key ingredient in tropical treats. And now Fruit Pulps are available in convenient packages with four individually-wrapped, single-use servings.


#90 Patrick S

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 12:24 PM

I am going to make this for our department party and I was wondering if anybody have trouble getting exact egg yolk and egg white weights. I find the eggs are slightly more than the recommended weights.

View Post


No problem. I weigh out my yolks and whites in disposable cups. If I need 8.5 yolks, I put in 9, and then take some out.

View Post

What do you think of this product, and would you think it would work in this cake? It is available at Whole Food Markets, so I wouldn't haveto mail order
From their website: Goya.com

Fruit Pulps
In several delicious tropical varieties like Passion Fruit, Papaya, Mango and Tamarind, these frozen fruit pulps are 100% natural, low in fat, high in Vitamin C, and cholesterol free. Used in smoothies and frozen desserts, Goya Fruit Pulps are the key ingredient in tropical treats. And now Fruit Pulps are available in convenient packages with four individually-wrapped, single-use servings.

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I've never used Goya fruit pulps, but I don't see any reason why they wouldn't work fine. If they are already sweetened, you might want to adjust the sugar in the gelee recipe according. I used a sweetened puree, so I left out all of the granulated sugar. Just adjust it to taste.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi





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