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Vermouth


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#241 SamChevre

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 01:33 PM

I saw some Spanish vermouth - Vermut Lacuesta - at the liquor store, so I picked it up.

 

The most noticeable difference relative to Cinzano or Martini and Rossi is that it is "lighter"; not in a bad way, but like the difference between Amarone and port.  The botanical profile is quite similar--maybe just a touch more bitter.  The sweetness and acidity are comparable.  It has very little of the cocoa taste of Cinzano and Cocchi, and it's less berry/cherry than the M&R.

 

For some reason, it tastes to me like it would complement brandy exceptionally well.  (I need to pick up some brandy and see.)

 

It's interesting, and very good straight, chilled.



#242 brinza

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 12:08 PM

I'm experimenting with a nice hot-weather drink called the Gentle Persuasion, since I have all the ingredients with the exception of Lillet Rose. I have Lillet (blond), but found the amount added to the drink was just too much, since I'm not even a big Lillet fan. Here's Gary Regan's adaptation of the cocktail:

 

1.5 oz Lillet Rose

1/2 oz Laird's applejack

3/4 oz fresh lemon juice

1/2 oz simple syrup

2 dashes Peychaud's

mint sprig

 

I used the Lillet Blond and cut it back somewhat, but I still want to get away from the Lillet taste. What might be a good substitute or variation? I have the following on hand: Bonal, Amaro CioCiara, Fernet Jelinek (that would be weird, no?) and Cocchi di Torino, along with the usual suspects of Noilly Prat dry and Martini & Rossi Red.

If you can get M&R Rosato, that might make a decent sub for Lillet Rosé.


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#243 Marya

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Posted 08 August 2014 - 01:59 AM

I saw some Spanish vermouth - Vermut Lacuesta - at the liquor store, so I picked it up.

 

The most noticeable difference relative to Cinzano or Martini and Rossi is that it is "lighter"; not in a bad way, but like the difference between Amarone and port.  The botanical profile is quite similar--maybe just a touch more bitter.  The sweetness and acidity are comparable.  It has very little of the cocoa taste of Cinzano and Cocchi, and it's less berry/cherry than the M&R.

 

For some reason, it tastes to me like it would complement brandy exceptionally well.  (I need to pick up some brandy and see.)

 

It's interesting, and very good straight, chilled.

You might also find Yzaguirre and Atxa (Perucchi, too) to your liking. I personally find that Spanish vermouth, particularly the reds, are naturals for sipping.  Maybe it's the memories they evoke of the tapas bars with vermouth barrels behind the counter that I first encountered four decades ago. Before they were available, Carpano Antico was, and still is, a favorite, but the Spanish beauties are the ones I choose for my "hora del vermut". I don't understand why they are not more popular in the states.



#244 lindag

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Posted 08 August 2014 - 02:42 PM

When a recipe calls for white wine I use vermouth because I never have a small amount of white wine available and I don't often drink it.  My vermouth seems to keep, opened, forever.


Edited by lindag, 08 August 2014 - 02:43 PM.


#245 Rafa

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Posted 08 August 2014 - 03:16 PM

Tempus Fugit Spirits announced the Alessio Vermouth Renaissance series, which will focus on vermouth styles that are seldom exported outside of Italy, and recreations of styles that are seldom seen at at all these days. Their first two releases, a Torino-style rosso and a chinato, should be available in October. 


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#246 bostonapothecary

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Posted 09 August 2014 - 09:26 AM

Fairly vigorous blind testing on Serious Eats: The Best Way to Store Vermouth

 

an idea to throw out there, which I just read about in a wine makers catalog, is to add glass marbles to your container to displace what was poured out. I guess some winemakers do this with experimental ferments when there is no stock to top it up with, and they don't want to/can't put down a gas blanket into a large void.

 

I'm not sure if the trick will come in handy for anyone's preservation ritual or small scale projects but there it is.


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#247 JMForester

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 06:26 AM

"add glass marbles to your container to displace what was poured out. I guess some winemakers do this with experimental ferments when there is no stock to top it up with, and they don't want to/can't put down a gas blanket into a large void."

 

I usually use a spritz of gas, but if you don't have a smaller container to decant into, something like glass marbles could work well. Just have to make sure they are inert, and sterile.



#248 Joe Blowe

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 08:53 AM

Serious Eats published a long write-up recently on storage options, The Best Way to Store Vermouth:
 

Refrigeration works pretty darned well. I wish I could go back in time and set up a more rigorous experiment, but I honestly thought I would be able to tell the difference in opened vs. unopened vermouth in just a few days time. Since a month made no difference to me, my hypothesis was obviously shattered.

 

Vermouth stays drinkable longer than wine does. Most wine lovers would agree that leaving a bottle of wine sitting on the counter for more than a day or two, let alone a few weeks, would mean having to scrap the bottle. And yet, after a full thirty days at room temperature during which I repeatedly opened a bottle of vermouth and exposed it to the air, still only four out of seven tasters could accurately identify the aged sample.

 

Inert gas works better than rebottling. This one was another big surprise for me. The rebottled vermouth had two things going for it: less headspace and the fact that I didn't open them over and over. And yet, more people correctly identified the rebottled sample—and disliked it—than the sample purged with inert gas.

 

 

Short version: Refrigeration and/or a can of inert gas are the best options.

 

 


So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.