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Chocolate Mousse: Recipes, Questions

Chocolate Dessert

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116 replies to this topic

#31 chiantiglace

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 09:01 PM

first of all, meringue made with sugar and egg whites cooked over a bain-marie is a Swiss Meringue, whoever told you it was Italian needs to do some more research.

Italian Meringue is a cooked syrup to softball stage in which is poured into whipping egg whites.

I have a feeling, because it was "chewy" that the whites were brought up too high (over 160).

Though any added fat will result in a smoother mouth feel, hence your appreciationg for whipped cream. Yolks give a nice medium between richness and stability.

With the whites, the objective is aretion of mouthfeel, have the lease density as possible. It's easier to fold warm chocolate into whites and keep aeration than it is into cream, since the fat is lining the air in the cream as opposed to the sugar in the whites.

It all depends on what you want, when you want it.

Edited by chiantiglace, 02 October 2006 - 09:02 PM.

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#32 Ross.ucf

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 10:28 PM

Am I the onlu one that thinks a meringue with chocolate folded into it is not a mousse but a chocolate meringue?

And barvarian cream with chocoloate is just chocolate barvarian cream and not a mousse?

#33 chiantiglace

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 10:33 PM

Am I the onlu one that thinks a meringue with chocolate folded into it is not a mousse but a chocolate meringue? 

And barvarian cream with chocoloate is just chocolate barvarian cream and not a mousse?

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Yes you are.

A mousse is a generic term to describe a temporary or stable aerated multi-component substance. You can easily have savory mousses, such as salmon mousse.

Also, once you incorporate (homogenously) a product with fat (ie chocolate) into the meringue, it is by far not a "meringue" any more. This is not like adding tarragon to a hollandaise and calling it a tarragon hollandaise instead of bernaise. This is like adding oil and emulisifier to vinegar and calling it a dressing or vinaigrette rather than a blasamic flavor olive oil.

Edited by chiantiglace, 02 October 2006 - 10:41 PM.

Dean Anthony Anderson
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#34 sanrensho

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 10:38 PM

Am I the onlu one that thinks a meringue with chocolate folded into it is not a mousse but a chocolate meringue? 

And barvarian cream with chocoloate is just chocolate barvarian cream and not a mousse?

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I don't have any problems calling any of those preparations a mousse. (No problem eating them either!)

The OED defines a mousse as "A sweet or savoury dish made from a puree or other base stiffened with whipped cream, gelatin, egg-whites, etc., and usu. served chilled." Sounds good to me!

Although, as someone who enjoys pastry, it would be nice to see more detailed descriptions (chibouste, bavarian, whipped cream) rather than simply calling everything "xxx mousse."

Edited by sanrensho, 02 October 2006 - 10:39 PM.

Baker of "impaired" cakes...

#35 chiantiglace

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 10:44 PM

also wanted to add, it is a chocolate bavarian cream, it is a chocolate sabayon, it is a chocolate bombe, etc, etc, etc.

But mousse is the mother name like a mother sauce. Bechamel-Bavarian Cream; Veloute - Diplomat Cream; Marinara - Sabayonl; Demi-Glace - Pate a Bombe.

Does that help?
Dean Anthony Anderson
"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This
Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

#36 Ross.ucf

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Posted 02 October 2006 - 11:23 PM

Yeah I get it. But I am the same type of person that would not call a bernaise sauce anything but a bernaise sauce, despite it is a sauce made from the base of hollandise. Matter of opinion ;)

#37 fanny_the_fairy

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Posted 04 December 2006 - 04:51 PM

Hi there,
last year (well, the 30th of last december to be accurate) i watched a Tamasin Day-Lewis show on UKTV food which featured a recipe for THE sexiest chocolate mousse.

This mousse is so luscious (call it sexy if you want), looked and sounded delicious. Though, it seems i've lost the paper on which i had written down the recipe.
It was made over a double broiler and used lots of chocolate.

Do you want to see me die from desperation - in pain and tears?
I guess you don't, so i BEG you: do have the recipe for it?

- fanny
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pâtisserie & sweetness

#38 aguynamedrobert

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 02:07 AM

Were you looking for that exact recipe or just a good chocolate Mousse recipe?

-Robert
Chocolate Forum

#39 fanny_the_fairy

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 02:30 AM

Were you looking for that exact recipe or just a good chocolate Mousse recipe?

-Robert
Chocolate Forum

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Hi Robert,
i'd love to find the original recipe.
But if you've got a recipe for 'the best chocolate mousse ever', i'll be more than happy!

- fanny
fanny loves foodbeam
pâtisserie & sweetness

#40 Shalmanese

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 02:37 AM

I was once in the possession of a recipe for the worlds sexiest chocolate mousse. Unfortunately, one evening, I absentmindedly left the stove on simmer to braise some lamb shanks and returned to find my kitchen ablaze! Thinking quickly, I dashed to my secret hiding spot to retrieve my precious recipe but, alas, it was all but consumed by flame. Grabbing the remenants and dashing outside as the kitchen collapsed around me, I found that all but the last step were consumed by the fire!

The sole remaining fragment in my possession reads thusly:

...Serve smeared over the body of a loved one.


PS: I am a guy.

#41 fanny_the_fairy

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 03:04 AM

...Serve smeared over the body of a loved one.


This is not exactly what i am looking for but i LOVE your way of thinking.
That would do a sexy chocolate mousse indeed!

- fanny

PS sorry for your kitchen!
fanny loves foodbeam
pâtisserie & sweetness

#42 Rachellindsay

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 05:42 AM

Fanny, I think I have the recipe you want....it's in her book "Tamasin's weekend food". I'm not sure about the rules of posting recipes on this forum so I will send it to you by PM.

#43 fanny_the_fairy

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 11:08 AM

Fanny, I think I have the recipe you want....it's in her book "Tamasin's weekend food". I'm not sure about the rules of posting recipes on this forum so I will send it to you by PM.

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Hi Rachel,
thanks.

- fanny
fanny loves foodbeam
pâtisserie & sweetness

#44 Pam R

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 04:49 PM

Fanny, I think I have the recipe you want....it's in her book "Tamasin's weekend food". I'm not sure about the rules of posting recipes on this forum so I will send it to you by PM.

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#45 Patrick S

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Posted 05 December 2006 - 05:35 PM

Fanny, I think I have the recipe you want....it's in her book "Tamasin's weekend food". I'm not sure about the rules of posting recipes on this forum so I will send it to you by PM.

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In a nutshell, as long as you write the recipe in your own words, there is no problem.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#46 Qui

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 09:12 AM

I have a chocolate mousse recipe that calls for boiling milk, adding some gelatin and pour it over chopped chocolate and mix. Let the mixture cool to slightly warm, then fold in soft peak whipped cream.

I have seen this done at a cooking demo and it was very smooth and tasty. I have also done it myslef with good result. But the last couple times that I've made this recipe, the mousse came out grainny and gritty. I can't figure out what I did wrong?

Could it be because I overwhipped my cream? or fold in my cream while chocolate mixture is too warm?

And what is the best way to whip cream? I have seen whipping small amount at high speed till peak, then gradually add more cold cream and continue to whip till desired texture. Or, put all the cream in the mixining bowl, whip at medium speed till desired texture.

Any input appreciated!

#47 filipe

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 10:04 AM

Low quality chocolate than the one used on previous times?
Lack of water draining from the gelatin sheets before adding them to the milk? The chocolate+milk+gelatine mix that you add to the whipped cream might have set up more than what was desired?
Try to mix part of the whites with the chocolate mixture, using your mixer, and then mix it over the remaining whites by hand... That's how I do on every mousse I make.
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#48 Lindacakes

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 11:25 AM

Try the one in Alice Medrich's Bittersweet.
I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

#49 aguynamedrobert

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 02:04 PM

Did you bloom the gelatin first? and did you use powder Gelatin or sheet gelatin?

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#50 Qui

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 03:06 PM

I used leave gelatin, and yes, I bloomed the gelatin.




Did you bloom the gelatin first? and did you use powder Gelatin or sheet gelatin?

Robert
Chocolate Forum

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#51 Qui

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 03:09 PM

I use the same chocolate all the time. Chocolate should not be the problem.


Low quality chocolate than the one used on previous times?
Lack of water draining from the gelatin sheets before adding them to the milk? The chocolate+milk+gelatine mix that you add to the whipped cream might have set up more than what was desired?
Try to mix part of the whites with the chocolate mixture, using your mixer, and then mix it over the remaining whites by hand... That's how I do on every mousse I make.

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#52 SweetSide

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 05:05 PM

WHAT are the grains? I've made mousse a time or two where my cream was very cold and caused the chocolate to set too fast making little "chips" in the mousse. What filipe was referring to when the chocolate+milk+gelatin sets up more than desired....

But, I never use gelatin in chocolate mousse, so I KNOW mine was the chocolate and not the gelatin.
Cheryl, The Sweet Side

#53 Qui

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 05:32 PM

mine looks like somekind of separation... it has something to do with the cream, I guess... maybe Filipe is right about the mixture set up more than desired... maybe I should whip the cream less?

when I taste it, the flavor is good, it just have a grainny mouth feel. It should have been smooth and melt in your mouth.


WHAT are the grains?  I've made mousse a time or two where my cream was very cold and caused the chocolate to set too fast making little "chips" in the mousse.  What filipe was referring to when the chocolate+milk+gelatin sets up more than desired....

But, I never use gelatin in chocolate mousse, so I KNOW mine was the chocolate and not the gelatin.

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#54 alanamoana

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Posted 06 December 2006 - 05:40 PM

Could it be because I overwhipped my cream? or fold in my cream while chocolate mixture is too warm...

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i think the most likely causes are a) overwhipped cream or b) as SweetSide mentioned, the cream being too cold and having the chocolate set up before becoming fully incorporated, causing little chocolate "chips" in the mousse

whenever you're folding something into whipped cream, it is better to whip it a little less because when you start folding it agitates it some more which can cause it to "overwhip"

when whipping cream and egg whites, it is fine to put everything in the mixing bowl at one time, but whip (relatively) slowly to end up with a nice, small, even network of air bubbles=smooth cream or meringue, regardless of soft or firm peak.

#55 Qui

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Posted 08 December 2006 - 05:35 PM

Thanks for the info. I will try again, and I will whip the cream less this time.
So, in your opinion, it's better to whip the cream at medium speed, so that it will form even smaller air bubbles.






Could it be because I overwhipped my cream? or fold in my cream while chocolate mixture is too warm...

View Post


i think the most likely causes are a) overwhipped cream or b) as SweetSide mentioned, the cream being too cold and having the chocolate set up before becoming fully incorporated, causing little chocolate "chips" in the mousse

whenever you're folding something into whipped cream, it is better to whip it a little less because when you start folding it agitates it some more which can cause it to "overwhip"

when whipping cream and egg whites, it is fine to put everything in the mixing bowl at one time, but whip (relatively) slowly to end up with a nice, small, even network of air bubbles=smooth cream or meringue, regardless of soft or firm peak.

View Post



#56 alanamoana

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Posted 08 December 2006 - 06:58 PM

yes

Thanks for the info. I will try again, and I will whip the cream less this time.
So, in your opinion, it's better to whip the cream at medium speed, so that it will form even smaller air bubbles.



#57 misstenacity

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 01:18 PM

What is the most stable of the various kinds of chocolate mousse preparations?

The ideal application is make the mousse in the evening, and then pastry-bag pipe it into dessert cups the next day (up to 24 hours later).

Do any hold up that long, and if not, what is the better solution to my desired outcome (fluffy chocolate inside an edible container)?

Thank you! :smile:

Andrea
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#58 jackal10

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 02:23 PM

What happened to the basic chocolate mouse - melted chocolate, butter, egg yolks, whipped egg whites, left to set in the fridge?
Same mixture cooked makes souffle, or roulade; if you don't whip the egg white you get fondant or molten chocolate cake...

#59 chiantiglace

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 08:19 PM

The basic chocolate mousse would be basically a stabilized sabayon base. That being egg yolks and sugar, cream, and melted chocolate. You can add butter to the chocolate if you want (depending on the chocolate). I am not a fan of eating straight up eggs and chocolate without some sort of baking.


MissTenacity -
if the mousse is going into a "holding container" then the basic method I just described would probably be best. It really has the best mouthfeelall the forms of mousse have there place depending on what you need or want to do.

Edited by chiantiglace, 05 August 2007 - 08:20 PM.

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#60 paulraphael

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 09:54 PM

a chocolate marquise is a type of mousse - it has eggs, butter, chocolate and cream....

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And it's far and away my favorite type (and my friends' too .... it's the only thing i've ever had people beg me to make).

Not sure how it fits into the regimented 6 types or 12 types ...

My favorite recipe, based pretty closely on Gilles Bajolles' version is here.





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