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Lemon Chiffon Cake

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37 replies to this topic

#1 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 09 July 2004 - 07:10 PM

Anyone have a recipe they've already made that they could highly reccomend? I haven't made one in ages..............

I recall seeing some great reviews on RLB's orange chiffon cake (although I haven't made it myself)......I was wondering if anyone here had made it and if so-any reason why I couldn't switch out the orange and make it lemon?

Thanks

#2 nightscotsman

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Posted 10 July 2004 - 03:06 AM

I've tried a couple of RLB's chiffon cake recipes, including the Orange Glow, and really like the texture and moistness. She has a Lemon Glow Chiffon Cake recipe in the Cake Bible, though I haven't made that one yet.

#3 Dee

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Posted 11 July 2004 - 08:08 PM

Yes, I've made the lemon chiffon cake from the Cake Bible, my first chiffon cake ever, as a matter of fact! And I was very happy with it, wonderful texture and moistness. Delicious with the lemon curd whipped cream which is in the CB also!

D

#4 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 11 July 2004 - 08:34 PM

O.k. thanks for reasuring me of my recipe choice. I don't have time to try this out or any other recipe so it's a one shot deal. I've got my fingers crossed RBL will come thru for me on this item.

#5 Tepee

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Posted 13 July 2004 - 03:27 AM

I'm a bit late...but here's my 2 sen on RLB Chiffon cakes. I've tried them all...and have this to say. Although her chiffon cakes turn out very moist, yet fluffy, I feel 1 1/4 tsp of cream of tartar asked in her recipes are too much; left me with a very unpleasant taste on my tongue. I'm afraid I'm very sensitive to cream of tartar and soda bicarbonate. Subsequently, I reduced it to 1/2 tsp and the texture of the cake did not seem to hurt, still good, but easier on the tongue. :rolleyes:
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#6 Samaki

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Posted 13 July 2004 - 11:22 AM

Have you tired it yet? I'm another big fan of RLB's orange and lemon chiffon cakes. In fact, I think they're the best cakes on the book.

#7 Fernwood

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Posted 13 September 2004 - 08:04 AM

I have a couple of questions for those who have experience with these RLB chiffon cake recipes:

I made the Orange glow cake yesterday. I followed the recipe quite strictly; the aluminum tube pan I used is rather lightweight, feels a little flimsy. It took a few minutes longer than written to bake, but seemed to turn out just right. My only problem was what seemed to be condensed moisture on the inside surfaces of the pan. The recipe specifies that the cake is cooled completely in the tube pan ("~1 1/2hrs"). There was so much moisture around the tube that there was syrup dripping down on the bottle that the upside-down pan was balanced on. After unmolding, the outer surface of the cake was unpleasantly gooey. I finally used a brush to clean away most of this wet, superficial crumb layer, then put the cake into the barely warm oven with the convection fan on until it was fairly dry to touch. Otherwise, the texture of the cake was great and it was well-received.

The other aspect that needed improvement, I thought, was presentation. The high, bare sides of this big, tall cake looked so stark to me! I agree with the book that it doesn't want an actual frosting. Does anyone have an idea for decoration/garnish/presentation to address this? I had no time to fool around and ended up dropping a little posy of nasturtiums into the center of the cake. I think this drew the eye to the bright flowers, away from the bare sides, but I was not entirely satisfied. Any suggestions?

Thanks, Fern

#8 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 13 September 2004 - 02:54 PM

Wow, the moisture dripping down as you described Fernwood, seems very strange indeed. At first I wondered if you underbaked your cake. Now I'm wondering if by chance you put it in a very confined area where it created steam with the different temp.s contrasting? Was your climate neutral.....was it raining or do you have your air conditioning on high?

Decorating I might shake some xxxsugar on top, or make a sugar drizzle. Whipped cream goes well with just about any cake and I typically offer it with a chiffon plus fresh fruit.

#9 Fernwood

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Posted 13 September 2004 - 08:27 PM

Thanks for the feedback, Wendy. The cake was in its tube pan, upside-down over a wine bottle on the kitchen counter to cool and it was a truly beautiful warm September day. As I mentioned above, I believe the instructions indicate it should cool completely in the pan, perhaps 1 1/2 hrs. In fact, when I think about it, I went out and didn't unmold it until over 4hrs later, maybe even more like 5, so maybe the moisture somehow continued to accumulate at the pan surfaces during its prolonged confinement. It certainly wasn't underbaked, or overbaked; I think the crumb was just right. Next time I'll stay home and unmold it more promptly. Since I never did a chiffon recipe before, I was wondering if the wetness was typical, but I bet the long rest in the pan was the error.

If I had nothing to do but bake, I could really nail all these details, but real life keeps getting in the way! :rolleyes: Fern

#10 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 14 September 2004 - 05:35 AM

Sorry Fernwood I don't know why that happened, perhaps someone else here will know. I'm pretty sure that holding it in the pan for a longer time with-out unpanning wouldn't cause that. I've left cakes in pans for multiple hours and never had anything similar happen. Nor do I think it was your pan, I've used very cheap thin tube pans too and found them to work as well as more pricey pans for these types of cakes.

I think this remains a mystery for now.

#11 Patrick S

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Posted 15 February 2005 - 10:43 AM

Wendy, did you ever try the RLB lemon chiffon? If so, what did you think? It occurred to me that in my quest for the perfect lemon cake, I hadnt tried a chiffon.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#12 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 15 February 2005 - 06:00 PM

To tell you the truth, I got side tracked totally and never did make it. I'm glad you brought this up because I have some free time now where I can give it a go.

#13 Patrick S

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Posted 15 February 2005 - 06:17 PM

I'm trying my hand at it right now. Just got the cake in the oven. I would have made it before, but after the first two RLB recipes I tried, I was slightly disappointed and didnt look at the Cake Bible for a while. It was only after a tried a banana chiffon that it occurred to me that lemon chiffon could be just what Im looking for. So maybe the third recipe will be the charm. I used about twice as much zest, and replaced 2tb of the water with 2tb of juice. I have a feeling that if I had only used 1tb zest and 2tb juice as the recipe calls for, it wouldnt be as lemony as I'd like. I'll let you know what I think of it!
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#14 chiantiglace

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Posted 16 February 2005 - 01:05 AM

Wendy, I haven't made this one in about 4 years, but I remember liking it more than Bo Friburgs.

8 oz/227 g - cake flour
10.5 oz/300 g - granulated sugar, divided
1/2 tsp/2.5 g - baking soda
1/2 tsp/ 3.35 g - salt
4 liq oz/119 ml - peanut oil
4.5 oz / 128 g - egg yolks
6 liq oz/177 ml - water
3 tbsp /45 ml - lemon juice
2 tbsp/12 g - grated lemon zest
1.5 tsp/3 g vanilla extract
10.5 oz/298 g - egg whites
1 tsp/3 g - cream of tartar

1) Preheat 325degrees
2) Line half sheet pan with parchment
3) In mixer with paddle, combine flour, 8 oz of sugar, baking soda and salt
4) Add oil, yolks, water, lemon juice, zest and vanilla; beat until smooth
5) Using the whisk, beat whites to soft peaks; beat in cream of tartar
6) Add remaining sugar and beat until stiff peaks form
7) Fold meringue into batter; scrape into prepared pan and bake for 20 minutes or until center springs back to the touch.
Dean Anthony Anderson
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#15 Patrick S

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Posted 16 February 2005 - 05:10 PM

I just had my first taste of the Lemon Glow Chiffon from the Cake Bible. The verdict? Its a hit. It may be my new favorite lemon cake. Its very spongy, but not so light that it disappears in your mouth. Moist, but 'durable' too. Unwimpy lemon flavor, but like I said, I doubled the zest and the juice. Its good all by itself, but I had just enough lemons left over to make another batch of Herme lemon cream (Have I mentioned in the last 5 minutes how that stuff is more addictive than crack? No? Well, it is.)

Posted Image
Posted Image

Question: What do PCs do with chiffon cakes? I mean, do you typically glaze them or fill them, or do you usually leave them as is? Just trawling for ideas.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#16 chiantiglace

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Posted 16 February 2005 - 05:41 PM

Fill them. Lemon Chiffon isn't big in the resturaunt. I think people like Wendy and Anne use chiffon a lot more than a resturaunt PC, because it just isnt that great for plated desserts.
Dean Anthony Anderson
"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This
Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

#17 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 17 February 2005 - 07:26 AM

I make everything imaginable in the way of sweets, from plated desserts to take-out b-day cakes to truffles, centerpeices, sticky rolls and doughnuts.

A lemon chiffon cake would be something I'd make for my bridge luncheon ladies, with some of Herme's lemon cream and berries.........they'd be pretty happy.

#18 Patrick S

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Posted 17 February 2005 - 07:09 PM

A lemon chiffon cake would be something I'd make for my bridge luncheon ladies, with some of Herme's lemon cream and berries.........they'd be pretty happy.

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I'll say! This is my new 'go to' lemon dessert. For the past couple of months, I've been looking for the best way to use that lemon cream. I tried it in sweet tart shells, phyllo cups, puff pastry, but it works so, so good with the chiffon cake.

Posted Image
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#19 nightscotsman

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Posted 18 February 2005 - 01:43 AM

Hey - this is a family site. Watch the pornography there, bub.

#20 sanrensho

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Posted 10 August 2006 - 01:17 PM

I just had my first taste of the Lemon Glow Chiffon from the Cake Bible. The verdict? Its a hit. It may be my new favorite lemon cake. Its very spongy, but not so light that it disappears in your mouth. Moist, but 'durable' too. Unwimpy lemon flavor, but like I said, I doubled the zest and the juice. Its good all by itself, but I had just enough lemons left over to make another batch of Herme lemon cream


I've been meaning to make this recipe for quite some time. I finally made it yesterday as per Patrick's adjustments, with double the juice but not quite double the zest. I did reduce the sugar by about two tablespoons.

Moistness and sweetness is just about perfect, and also quite sliceable as you mention. This is a perfect "summer" cake, very light and good on its own. The great thing about chiffon cakes is being able to eat multiple large slices of cake without it feeling too heavy.

Edited by sanrensho, 10 August 2006 - 01:18 PM.

Baker of "impaired" cakes...

#21 LittleIsland

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Posted 06 September 2006 - 04:09 AM

Do you find chiffon layers sink under filling? I'd like to fill this cake with lemon curd (posted on the Lemon Curd thread, looking for a firm-ish curd) and some sort of lemon cream.

But when I once filled a chocolate chiffon cake with mousse etc. the layers compressed - maybe I'd done something wrong - but it's scared me a little off filling chiffon cakes.

What's the secret, if there is one? If I were to fill the centre with a curd and a cream, and top it again with cream and curd, do you think RLB's chiffon cake would stand up under it or compress or slip under all that weight? And, how many layers do you think I could reasonably create (looking at 3) without having layers slip out from underneath? Remembering the tropical heat I'm working in averages about 30 - 33 deg C.

Edited by LittleIsland, 06 September 2006 - 04:11 AM.


#22 TraciiTVCL

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 02:30 PM

Thank you Patrick for this picture. I was not sure about the height.

#23 Patrick S

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Posted 08 September 2006 - 06:16 AM

Do you find chiffon layers sink under filling?  I'd like to fill this cake with lemon curd (posted on the Lemon Curd thread, looking for a firm-ish curd) and some sort of lemon cream. 

But when I once filled a chocolate chiffon cake with mousse etc. the layers compressed - maybe I'd done something wrong - but it's scared me a little off filling chiffon cakes.

What's the secret, if there is one?  If I were to fill the centre with a curd and a cream, and top it again with cream and curd, do you think RLB's chiffon cake would stand up under it or compress or slip under all that weight?  And, how many layers do you think I could reasonably create (looking at 3) without having layers slip out from underneath?  Remembering the tropical heat I'm working in averages about 30 - 33 deg C.

View Post


As I recall, this cake was more than sturdy enough to support some lemon curd.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#24 iii_bake

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Posted 09 September 2006 - 08:32 AM

Do you find chiffon layers sink under filling?  I'd like to fill this cake with lemon curd (posted on the Lemon Curd thread, looking for a firm-ish curd) and some sort of lemon cream. 

But when I once filled a chocolate chiffon cake with mousse etc. the layers compressed - maybe I'd done something wrong - but it's scared me a little off filling chiffon cakes.

What's the secret, if there is one?  If I were to fill the centre with a curd and a cream, and top it again with cream and curd, do you think RLB's chiffon cake would stand up under it or compress or slip under all that weight?  And, how many layers do you think I could reasonably create (looking at 3) without having layers slip out from underneath?  Remembering the tropical heat I'm working in averages about 30 - 33 deg C.

View Post


As I recall, this cake was more than sturdy enough to support some lemon curd.

View Post


Great picture and Thanks.
I am bad at foam cake and would like to try this...
what pan did you bake in? and what is the approximate height of the finished cake?
Any warning before i jump in?
Thnks

#25 reenicake

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Posted 10 September 2006 - 08:05 PM

I just wish to say, lovely execution on the chiffon with lemon curd. I like RLB's recipe to turn out a light sliceable cake to serve with fruit.
Just surprised nobody mentioned baking chiffon in regular pans to split and fill like a regular cake. To my mind, it is the happy medium of genoise-lightness (of a foam cake) and butter cake moistness (given that is has as much fat as these.) I still douse it with boozy syrup, but just for flavor.
For lemon and orange chiffon, I use a modification of the formula in Wayne Gisslen's Professional Baking. In comparison to RLB, it has less whites so more backbone to support filling. It tiers great -- I know from experience. Did 6 tiers on national television (Grand Marnier syrup, filled with blueberry and mascarpone, iced with white choc ganache buerre, chocolate and gumpaste decs) and they stood up.

#26 Patrick S

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Posted 15 September 2006 - 09:30 AM

Do you find chiffon layers sink under filling?  I'd like to fill this cake with lemon curd (posted on the Lemon Curd thread, looking for a firm-ish curd) and some sort of lemon cream. 

But when I once filled a chocolate chiffon cake with mousse etc. the layers compressed - maybe I'd done something wrong - but it's scared me a little off filling chiffon cakes.

What's the secret, if there is one?  If I were to fill the centre with a curd and a cream, and top it again with cream and curd, do you think RLB's chiffon cake would stand up under it or compress or slip under all that weight?  And, how many layers do you think I could reasonably create (looking at 3) without having layers slip out from underneath?  Remembering the tropical heat I'm working in averages about 30 - 33 deg C.

View Post


As I recall, this cake was more than sturdy enough to support some lemon curd.

View Post


Great picture and Thanks.
I am bad at foam cake and would like to try this...
what pan did you bake in? and what is the approximate height of the finished cake?
Any warning before i jump in?
Thnks

View Post


Sorry I missed your questions, iii_bake.

I baked this cake in a 10" tube pan.
The finished cake is about 4.5-5" tall.
Tips: seperate your eggs while they are cool, but beat your whites at room temp. Fold the ingredients together gently, but also make sure you do it thoroughly -- the batter should look homogenous -- no streaks or egg whites or of the flour mixture. Don't open the oven til your ready to test the cake for doness, and when you do that, be quick. Don't put the tube pan on top of a baking sheet as an insurance policy against drips -- air needs to be able to circulate through the middle of the tube pan. That's all I can think of. Good luck!
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#27 iii_bake

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Posted 15 September 2006 - 03:59 PM

Do you find chiffon layers sink under filling?  I'd like to fill this cake with lemon curd (posted on the Lemon Curd thread, looking for a firm-ish curd) and some sort of lemon cream. 

But when I once filled a chocolate chiffon cake with mousse etc. the layers compressed - maybe I'd done something wrong - but it's scared me a little off filling chiffon cakes.

What's the secret, if there is one?  If I were to fill the centre with a curd and a cream, and top it again with cream and curd, do you think RLB's chiffon cake would stand up under it or compress or slip under all that weight?  And, how many layers do you think I could reasonably create (looking at 3) without having layers slip out from underneath?  Remembering the tropical heat I'm working in averages about 30 - 33 deg C.

View Post


As I recall, this cake was more than sturdy enough to support some lemon curd.

View Post


Great picture and Thanks.
I am bad at foam cake and would like to try this...
what pan did you bake in? and what is the approximate height of the finished cake?
Any warning before i jump in?
Thnks

View Post


Sorry I missed your questions, iii_bake.

I baked this cake in a 10" tube pan.
The finished cake is about 4.5-5" tall.
Tips: seperate your eggs while they are cool, but beat your whites at room temp. Fold the ingredients together gently, but also make sure you do it thoroughly -- the batter should look homogenous -- no streaks or egg whites or of the flour mixture. Don't open the oven til your ready to test the cake for doness, and when you do that, be quick. Don't put the tube pan on top of a baking sheet as an insurance policy against drips -- air needs to be able to circulate through the middle of the tube pan. That's all I can think of. Good luck!

View Post


Got it. Thanks, Patrick.
I will go thru the recipe and start right away (with crossed fingers).
iii :smile: :smile: :smile:

#28 iii_bake

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 11:39 PM

Dear Patirck,
Again, Thanks for the advice.
The chiffon is now hanging on the bottle neck!
I was so ignorant that i put the cake on the middle rack...it was too close to the top heat and the cake burnt on the top. The batter fills to the rim of the mould...is it supposed to be so?
When in the oven, it rose about an inch, back to the rim when took out.
Is this normal?
Like i said, i am totally blank about foam cake.
I use silicone flute mould. Hope i can take it out successfully.
I am happy with my first attempt so far.
Thanks
iii
:smile: :smile: :smile:

#29 iii_bake

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Posted 18 September 2006 - 12:52 AM

:sad: :sad: :sad:
Here's the result:
The cake finished almost 4 inch tall with burnt top and stuck bottom
I have no removable bottom pan so i used silicone one.
I got it from Crate n Barrel...but the cake stuck!?!
What do we do with this type of mould though if you cannot remove the cake easily?
What should i do? ( of course i will find the removable one....but what about this silicone thing?)
Sad-O-Sad, kindly help

iii
:sad: :sad: :sad:

#30 Patrick S

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Posted 18 September 2006 - 06:15 AM

:sad:  :sad:  :sad:
Here's the result:
The cake finished almost 4 inch tall with burnt top and stuck bottom
I have no removable bottom pan so i used silicone one.
I got it from Crate n Barrel...but the cake stuck!?!
What do we do with this type of mould though if you cannot remove the cake easily?
What should i do? ( of course i will find the removable one....but what about this silicone thing?)
Sad-O-Sad, kindly help

iii
:sad:  :sad:  :sad:

View Post


Something has gone very wrong if the top of the cake is burnt -- either the oven is too hot, or you've baked too long.

Personally, I have not had favorable experiences with silicone cake pans, except for my silicone loaf pan, which I mostly use to mold fudge and things like that. If I were you, what I would do is chill the cake in the frudge, then use a plastic knife or something like that to try to free as much of the cake from the side of the pan as you can. For the bottom of the cake, I guess all you can really do is reach your hand in there, and try to pull it from the bottom as best you can. If you mangle the cake, you can always cut off the top and bottom.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi





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