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Preserving Summer


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#31 trillium

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Posted 24 June 2004 - 11:38 AM

It looks promising mostly to me because the ingredients are listed as weights not volume. I can't even make all the jams I want to out of the Ferber book because I'm running out of jars and eaters. Let us know how you like it and what you make so I can live vicariously through you, ok?

regards,
trillium

#32 Bond Girl

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Posted 24 June 2004 - 11:47 AM

I hate all you guys. Now I am off to B&N to get that Mes Confiture book.
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#33 ElfWorks

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Posted 24 June 2004 - 06:40 PM

I can't even make all the jams I want to out of the Ferber book because I'm running out of jars and eaters. trillium

i did mention to you that i would be happy to send you my snail mail address, didnt i?

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#34 BettyK

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Posted 25 June 2004 - 01:01 AM

Just bought 'The Complete Book of Year-Round Small-Batch Preserving: Over 300 Delicious Recipes' by Ellie Topp, Margaret Howard. Click here.
Haven't tried anything yet as I'm still waiting for some decent fruits here :rolleyes: but I like the idea or small-batches. Just thought I'd share. :biggrin:

Edited: Now the link should work, I think.

Edited by BettyK, 25 June 2004 - 01:04 AM.


#35 Abra

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Posted 25 June 2004 - 07:37 AM

Trillium, would you be so kind as to post the raspberry and rose recipe? We have a ton of raspberries right now, and I'm turning pink from eating them all myself. I love rose, and it sounds wonderful with raspberries.

#36 agnolottigirl

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Posted 25 June 2004 - 08:07 AM

and speaking of rose, does anybody know how to make rose hip preserves? How 'bout tea? I vaguely remember both from childhood vacations in Maine, but I haven't the foggiest idea how to reproduce either. . . but do have rose hips in abundance.
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#37 trillium

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Posted 25 June 2004 - 10:46 AM

I think there is a rose hip preserve recipe in Mes Confitures.

For raspberry and rose, I sort of just winged it from other combinations she had in her book. I did an 80% sugar to fruit ratio by weight, for 1 kg of raspberry (about 2.2 lb) I used the juice of half of a large lemon. I brought them up slowly to a simmer so the sugar could melt, and then cranked the heat up to high to boil so the pectin would set. I stirred very gently so that I didn't break up all the berries, and skimmed off the foam. I like to moniter the temp with a thermometer, instead of using the saucer in the freezer trick, and I cooked it until it reached 105 C or 221 F. I had gathered some very fragrant rose petals from the yard (you should do it in the morning when they are still fragrant and then use them pretty soon after), and blew on them to get all the bugs and stuff out, and then spread them on a sheet of wax paper and kind of tossed them around to encourage any lurking instect to crawl away. I had about 3 handfuls worth, I didn't weigh them, but they nearly filled up a pint berry box. I divided them in the bottoms of the jars (2 pints and a half pint) and when the raspberries were done and at the right temp, I skimmed them one last time and then stirred in 45 mls (1.5 US oz) of rose water. Then ladled the hot liquid over the rose petals and sealed as usual. You're supposed to gently shake the jars after they've cooled enough to handle but before the jam sets so that you distribute the petals throughout the jar. My jam was so thick by the time I tried this that I had a lot of trouble.

regards,
trillium

Edited by trillium, 25 June 2004 - 01:19 PM.


#38 andiesenji

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Posted 25 June 2004 - 10:52 AM

For several years I have been using a recipe I originally got online at SOAR, now Recipe Source.
It is easier than the old recipe I had used prior, fewer steps and the result is very good.

Recipe Source
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#39 Liz Johnson

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Posted 25 June 2004 - 03:16 PM

Freeze the fruit first for better extraction. Shake every day for a few weeks.

Jackal10,
I saw a recipe in this month's Saveur for brandied sweet cherries that says to sterlize jars and keep the mixture refrigerated for up to a year. Is all that necessary?
It does not say to shake the jar.

I'd like to infuse some rum with ginger and jalapeno to make a cocktail I tried at Cafe Atlantico in DC and wondered if the same precautions are necessary? (I've never heard that they are, but I'm wondering why the cherries need to be refrigerated, then.)

Liz
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#40 Abra

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Posted 25 June 2004 - 05:30 PM

Thanks, trillium! I don't have roses (they don't grow well here in the salty cool air), and for some reason I'd assumed that the jam would use rose flower water. But now that I have the idea, I don't see why I can't just add a touch of rose water to some jam, or any other raspberry concoction.

Or, my CSA farmer does grow roses, and maybe she can give me some delicious petals.

#41 trillium

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Posted 29 June 2004 - 01:22 PM

Thanks, trillium! I don't have roses (they don't grow well here in the salty cool air), and for some reason I'd assumed that the jam would use rose flower water. But now that I have the idea, I don't see why I can't just add a touch of rose water to some jam, or any other raspberry concoction.

Or, my CSA farmer does grow roses, and maybe she can give me some delicious petals.

The jam I made did contain rose water too, did you miss that part because I rambled on so much? I forgot to mention that Ms. Ferber frequently uses dried rose petals more often then fresh in her jams. That could work for you too, if you really had to have the petals in there.

regards,
trillium

#42 jackal10

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Posted 29 June 2004 - 01:58 PM

Jackal10,
I saw a recipe in this month's Saveur for brandied sweet cherries that says to sterlize jars and keep the mixture refrigerated for up to a year. Is all that necessary?
It does not say to shake the jar....

Liz

I think the product in the recipe you saw was the cherries, rather than the flavoured brandy. In that case you would want to try and preserve the fruit, rather than maximise the extraction. In my case I want the maximum flavour in the liquid, and don't mind if the fruit gets bruised a bit.

Lots of work, for example by the people making Glace fruit, show that for best results you need to agitate, otherwise the liquid next to the fruit gets dilute from the osmosis.

Whether you need to keep it in the fridge depends on the dilution. Bugs won't grow if the alcohol/sugar level is high enough, If you are making brandied cherries for consumption its normal have quite dilute brandy; to cut the brandy by at least an equal amount of water (plus the water in the fruit etc), otherwise they blow your head off. In that case you probably need to sterilize and either can or keep refrigerated.
In my case I was using export strength gin (40%), and as the recipe says "keeps for a year in the bottle if allowed to do so"

#43 Rachel Perlow

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Posted 01 July 2004 - 08:42 AM

While surfing for recipes on lychee jelly/preserves/jam, I discovered this book: A Passion for Preserves, by Frederica Langeland.

I've edited the above link to give eGullet a commission if anyone buys it. Please use eGullet commissioned links when purchasing from Amazon.com.

#44 Kayaksoup

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Posted 02 July 2004 - 09:06 AM

I am new here, but this thread is what inspired me to join. I am currently obsessed with canning, making jams etc..
And now, thanks to you, I think I have to buy Mes Confitures
Looking forward to hearing more about everyone's preserving adventures. :smile:

Edited by Kayaksoup, 02 July 2004 - 09:07 AM.

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#45 trillium

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Posted 02 July 2004 - 10:56 AM

Welcome!

If you get off with only buying one cookbook from hanging around eGullet, you'll be lucky.

Tonight I'm finishing the black currant and pinot noir preserves. Working with fresh black currants has really opened my eyes to their mult-dimensional flavor profile. I didn't realize how herbal and astringent and fruity all at the same time they could taste, I guess because my main black currant experience is the jar of Ribena the partner has to have in the pantry at all times.

regards,
trillium

#46 beans

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Posted 03 July 2004 - 08:57 AM

A Passion for Preserves arrived today.

It is gorgeous and I'm only on page 14. And it has already made me laugh. In the chapter titled "The Basics" there's a heading called Patience.

This is needed in great quantities.


The next sentence in the following heading/paragraph ("Methods and Materials"):

Be methodical, to save your sanity.


I can't wait to get to the other chapters. :cool:


edited to add:

OMG!!! Cantalope Jam! Tomato Basil Jam! Garlic-Herb Marmalade! Fennel Jam -- and I don't even like fennel! And so many others.... This may be the most fantastic cookbook I have purchased in quite some time. Absolutely brilliant. (I'm now nearly halfway through the book -- just paging, skimming and not yet reading every word on every page).

Edited by beans, 03 July 2004 - 09:14 AM.


#47 Kayaksoup

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Posted 05 July 2004 - 07:31 AM

Thank you for the welcome.

My local book store does not have the book I wanted, in fact has only one book on preserving/making jam, so i think I will have to head up to Chapters and see if I can find anything.

This A Passion for Preserves sounds fascinating as well..

I have some new fruit to play with, red currants and some gorgeous fat gooseberries. That'll be my Tuesday project.

Someone asked earlier what people do with all the jam they make. I use a lot in cooking, plus I am the only person in my circle of friends and family that does this, so I have lots of victims. In fact, I can't keep up with the demand for Ginger Marmalade!

Edited by Kayaksoup, 05 July 2004 - 08:23 AM.

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#48 Suzanne F

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Posted 05 July 2004 - 08:13 AM

Dare I admit that I don't use recipes? I just take whatever fruit I've got, add about 75 to 80% sugar, and whatever else I feel like adding, and boil it until it seems done. Seal in jars and store in the fridge, so it keeps for years. (I just checked, and we are FINALLY on the last bit of gooseberry jam, which celebrates its 9th birthday tomorrow! :shock: ) I've also got some currant-ginger from 3 years ago. They might crystalize a bit, but they don't go bad. (The only one I ever had get fuzzy was a microwave-cooked plum jam. Take that as a warning.)

My most recent -- this past week -- was sour cherry-ginger: a little over 4 pounds of pitted cherries, about 3 1/2 pounds of sugar, 4 "thumbs" of ginger grated in, and a splash of lemon juice. It's a little loose even after 45 minutes of boiling (very juicy cherries), but so what? Used some in cream-cheese and jelly sandwiches yesterday, and it's good. :biggrin:

In spite of what I said at the start -- Kayaksoup, how do you make the ginger marmalade? We love that stuff!

Edited by Suzanne F, 05 July 2004 - 08:15 AM.


#49 andiesenji

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Posted 05 July 2004 - 08:21 AM

In spite of what I said at the start -- Kayaksoup, how do you make the ginger marmalade? We love that stuff!

I second that motion! I have several recipes for ginger marmalade, also with various combinations but am always looking for more.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#50 Kayaksoup

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Posted 05 July 2004 - 08:22 AM

Suzanne, I actually got the recipe from someone on another board. I use lime juice instead of the lemon when I make it:


* Exported from MasterCook *

Ginger Marmalade 1

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1 pound fresh gingerroot -- (about)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 package powdered fruit pectin -- (1 3/4 ounce)
5 cups granulated sugar -- (2 1/2 pounds)

Thinly pare gingerroot; slice about 1/4 inch thick. In a 5 to 8 quart pot generously cover ginger with cold water; bring to a boil; boil gently for 15 minutes; drain in a strainer. Return ginger to pot, and generously cover with fresh cold water; boil until gingerroot is tender-crisp enough to be pierced with a fork --- about 45 minutes; drain in a strainer. Again return to pot and generously cover with fresh cold water; let stand 15 minutes; thoroughly drain in a strainer. Place in a processor, pulse until it is the size of rice grains, do not puree. This can be done by chopping with a knife. Turn 2 1/2 cups of the finely chopped ginger into the clean dry saucepan; add 1 cup cold water, the lemon juice and fruit pectin. Over high heat, stir until mixture comes to a full boil. Stirring constantly, immediately add all the sugar and bring to a full rolling boil; stirring constantly, boil hard for 1 minute.
Off heat, with a metal spoon, skim off the foam. Quickly ladle into clean hot, wide mouth 8 -ounce preserving jars, filling to within 1/4 inch of the top. With a clean cloth wipe tops and threads of jars. Adjust covers ( caps and screwbands).
Process in a boiling-water bath for 5 minutes. Cool on a wire rack. Store in a cool dry place. Makes 6 to 7 eight ounce jars.

Andy's note: I finely chop the ginger rather than use the food processor - I love the tiny chunks of ginger.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
I wish I had the confidence to work without a recipe. But at this point, I have only a years experience under my belt. With time, I hope to be able to run on instinct.
< Linda >

#51 Liz Johnson

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Posted 05 July 2004 - 09:03 AM

My most recent -- this past week -- was sour cherry-ginger

That's so funny — I made a sour cherry pie and decided on ginger ice cream to accompany it. Excellent flavor combination, isn't it?
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#52 Suzanne F

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Posted 05 July 2004 - 09:04 AM

Thanks for that recipe!

Cooking anything without recipes demands a high tolerance for failure. Or at least for keeping a straight face when telling other people that that's really how it's supposed to turn out. :wink:

But I would never, ever, ever try to bake without a recipe. I'm not that good a chemist.

edit to add: Liz, I have yet to find any fruit that does not go well with ginger. YUM!!!

Edited by Suzanne F, 05 July 2004 - 09:05 AM.


#53 beans

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Posted 05 July 2004 - 09:51 AM

Dare I admit that I don't use recipes? I just take whatever fruit I've got, add about 75 to 80% sugar, and whatever else I feel like adding, and boil it until it seems done. Seal in jars and store in the fridge, so it keeps for years. (I just checked, and we are FINALLY on the last bit of gooseberry jam, which celebrates its 9th birthday tomorrow! :shock: ) I've also got some currant-ginger from 3 years ago. They might crystalize a bit, but they don't go bad. (The only one I ever had get fuzzy was a microwave-cooked plum jam. Take that as a warning.)

My most recent -- this past week -- was sour cherry-ginger: a little over 4 pounds of pitted cherries, about 3 1/2 pounds of sugar, 4 "thumbs" of ginger grated in, and a splash of lemon juice. It's a little loose even after 45 minutes of boiling (very juicy cherries), but so what? Used some in cream-cheese and jelly sandwiches yesterday, and it's good. :biggrin:

In spite of what I said at the start -- Kayaksoup, how do you make the ginger marmalade? We love that stuff!

You are brave! :biggrin:

Cherries are very low on pectin and will be a very soft set which is why sometimes you'll see recipes calling for the addition of apples.

After awhile of making jellies and jams you gain enough confidence and experience to go without a recipe, but I really had questions about some more of the exotic stuff and things I never thought could be done. (Praline Milk Jam made with whole milk!)

#54 beans

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Posted 05 July 2004 - 10:02 AM

Paraphrased from A Passion for Preserves -- Ginger Marmalade
Makes about 4 cups

3 pounds tart apples
2 cups water
8 ounces Canton ginger
sugar

Coarsely chop apples, skins cores and all. Simmer in the water until thick and pulpy, then strain overnight through a jelly bag.

The next day, add finely chopped ginger into the extracted apple juice and measure 1 cup of sugar per cup of the ginger-apple juice. Combine and bring to a boil stirring to dissolve sugar. Boil rapidly for about 10 minutes, or until set.

Remove from heat and jar.

Seal with your preferred method -- either immediately turning jars upside down or waterbath.


I understand it is an excellent accompanyment as a dipping sauce for shrimp tempura. :smile:

#55 beans

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Posted 13 July 2004 - 12:27 PM

Today I've started White Peach and Lemon Verbena jam from Ferber's book. It smells heavenly. The white peaches were gorgeous too. I think I'll go back to the market and grab a few more and a bottle of prosecco. (all fruit in my household have the danger of never making it beyond breakfast or for cocktails... :raz: )

#56 trillium

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Posted 13 July 2004 - 04:32 PM

Last night I made 5 half-pints of red currant jelly and 1 pint of pickled sour cherries. All of the recipes came out of Chez Panisse Fruits. I found the red currant jelly in that book much less fussy then Ms. Ferber's and since it is so goddamn hot right now, less fussy is good. The leftovers and skimmings tasted great on toast this morning. I had no idea red currant jelly actually had a nice taste. I'd only ever had the store bought kind and I always wondered why people would use it to wreck a perfectly good fruit tart. The sour cherry pickles were touted as being "irresistable" when offered with charcuterie. I intend to try out the claim when I start making terrines again in the fall. I hope I'm not sorry I didn't brandy more, but the only pint I did used up the last of the brandy! The rest of the sour cherries got mashed with some sugar to be turned into bounce after they do a little fermenting on their own.


regards,
trillium

#57 Kayaksoup

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Posted 15 July 2004 - 08:06 AM

Trillium, I made red currant jelly last week and was also pleasantly surprised that it actually had flavour! Now I just need to find a good recipe for Cumberland sauce.....
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#58 trillium

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Posted 15 July 2004 - 10:37 AM

Chez Panisse Fruits has a translation of some important food guy's recipe for Cumberland Sauce... maybe Brillat Savarin? If I remember I'll try to post it.

More on red currants, my German buddy stopped by and was eating the left over bits of red and black currant jellies sitting out in the kitchen. He's asked me to get him some red currants this weekend so he can make his grandmother's version of "red grits". I'm blanking on the actual German name for this. Anyway, for those that have too many currants, it might be something to check out.

regards,
trillium

#59 SethG

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Posted 15 July 2004 - 07:40 PM

Thanks in part to this thread, I have checked out of my local library both The Complete Book of Year-Round Small-Batch Preserving and Mes Confitures.

I'm having fun with both; tonight was my first time out with Ms. Ferber-- I made her Black Currant Jelly, which couldn't be simpler. And it tastes fantastic. But I have a question: do y'all really think her canning instructions are sufficient? She instructs the reader to put the empty jars in boiling water for a couple minutes, then fill them up to the very top (!) while hot, cover the jars, and flip them upside down. That's it, no room left for air, and no boiling again in the water bath.

I chickened out tonight, and disregarded Ms. Ferber's method. I left the conventional air space in my jars and boiled them after they were filled. But I'm curious as to what you folks think.
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#60 Kayaksoup

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Posted 15 July 2004 - 09:56 PM

Although i have yet to secure myself a copy of Ferber's book, I would say that I could not do preserves without a water bath. I would spend the rest of their shelf life obsessing over wether they would last or not :wink:
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