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Food Shutter Bug Club


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579 replies to this topic

#571 dcarch

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 06:41 PM

Thanks, C. sapidus. I think I'll spare your puny planet, for now.

Is there any way to get that flat, narrow DOF besides using a longer length of focus, such as manipulating aperture and/or shutter speed?


Short answer, no.

A very small aperture (old pin hole camera) can eliminate some spherical distortion.

dcarch

#572 Dakki

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 06:58 PM

Lots of good info here. Thanks, guys. (And keep it coming if you have any more!)
This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

#573 C. sapidus

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 07:07 PM

More than you ever wanted to know about depth of field from DOF master (click)

Edited to add:

Short version: Long focal length + wide aperture = narrow depth of field.

Edited by C. sapidus, 05 January 2012 - 07:18 PM.


#574 Blether

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 10:22 PM

Yes, wider apertures give a shallower depth-of-field (and of course you have to use a faster shutter speed to go with them).

I can't believe there's not more love for tripods, at least in the home kitchen: dcarch, your suggestion of self-timer is a good one. Another tip is to drink 30 less beers the night before :shock:

With an SLR now, Dakki, you've the chance of using bounced flash - buy a flash unit with a head that swivels between straight-forward and straight-up, and work out how to set the aperture in various situations (trial and error for your particular kitchen, say). Some of the folks round here who produce exceptional photos are using bounced flash regularly. You also now have the option of multiple flashes (wired together or with the 'slave' sensors that are common now), if you want to get into serious studio-type photography. 2/3 of the light from above and to one side; 1/3 from the other side; a little backlighting for depth.

It's still a trusim that when real expert phtographers talk about equipment, it's about their preference for tripod mounting head.

Edited by Blether, 05 January 2012 - 10:25 PM.


#575 Dakki

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 10:32 PM

Er, SLR? I think I must've misposted: this is what I got. I didn't pay that much for it, though.

I did get a little toy tripod to go with it.
This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

#576 Blether

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 10:33 PM

... What's a good length to start at? Does it vary by lens? ...


You won't normally go shorter than a normal lens (50mm length in the 35mm SLR format) for food photography. I'd say a portrait lens or just a bit longer (80-100mm) is as long as you'll need to go to cover more than 90% of your needs here. A zoom lens covers all the lens lengths from its minimum to its maximum (so for example a 28mm-105mm zoom would be a good starting place). The trade-off with zoom lenses is that (at maximum aperture) they let in less light than 'prime' (single-length) lenses. So you might see a 28-105mm lens with an aperture range f22 - f3.5; but a fixed 50mm lens f22-f1.4.

A macro facility (lets you get real close and real detailed) is also an asset in shooting food.

#577 Blether

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 10:35 PM

Er, SLR? I think I must've misposted: this is what I got...


Hahahaha. Hmm. Scratch all that.

#578 Dakki

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 10:42 PM

It's good to know this stuff anyway. Thanks.
This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

#579 Dakki

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 11:00 PM

The reason I'm asking about apertures and lens speeds and so on is that this camera has manual controls for those things on the body. That's the reason I retired the old one.

I really don't want to get into the whole buying-a-whole-bunch-of-lenses-and-filters-and-whatnot-and-getting-married-to-a-brand thing, and even the old camera was a bit too bulky for me anyway. Of the pocket-sized ones with manual controls this one apparently has the better low light performance, as well as being rather less expensive. (I ended up blowing the putative savings on spare battery, cards, etc. anyway).
This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

#580 ChefCrash

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 11:11 PM

Thanks, C. sapidus. I think I'll spare your puny planet, for now.

Is there any way to get that flat, narrow DOF besides using a longer length of focus, such as manipulating aperture and/or shutter speed?



If by "narrow DOF" you mean shallow dof like this:
PC042227-2.jpg

It's tough to achieve with a small sensor camera. But can easily be done in post using Photoshop. This works best with photos taken at low angles. Here is Sobaaddict's photo:
6541692139_1582d68c4d_o.jpg

This is how it looks after one minute in Photoshop:

6541692139_1582d68c4de_o.jpg



Open your photo in PS. Click on the layers menu and choose "duplicate layer". In the dialogue box click "ok".

Untitled-1.jpg

Click on the filters menu and choose "Gaussian Blur". In the dialogue box choose a number between 5 and 20. Click "ok".

Untitled-2.jpg



Create a mask by clicking on the square icon with the small circle in the middle, at the bottom of the Layers pallet.
Choose the "Gradient Fill tool". Place the pointer at the tip of the piece of fish in the foreground (bottom of image), click and drag a straight line to the top of the image. That's it. If you don't like the effect, just undo and place the pointer in a different spot, click and drag up to the top again.

Untitled-3.jpg

 

 

 

 

[Moderator note: This topic continues here, Food Shutter Bug Club (Part 2)]


Edited by Mjx, 01 September 2013 - 09:18 AM.
Moderator note added.