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Lemon Curd: The Topic


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#181 arriba!

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 06:40 AM

I might need to start a new thread for this question but hope it gets noticed here. Can PH lemon cream be used instead of lemon curd to make a lemon curd cake? This is not Emily Lucchetti's curd cake where the curd is mixed into the batter--it is a layer cake with curd between the layers and mixed with whipped cream for icing.

#182 miladyinsanity

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 06:57 AM

I might need to start a new thread for this question but hope it gets noticed here.  Can PH lemon cream be used instead of lemon curd to make a lemon curd cake?  This is not Emily Lucchetti's curd cake where the curd is mixed into the batter--it is a layer cake with curd between the layers and mixed with whipped cream for icing.

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You will need a buttercream dam for the layers. And you will have to cut the cake frozen.

Not sure how it'll last mixed with the whipped cream for icing.
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#183 arriba!

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 07:40 AM

I have made the cake several times using lemon curd--I have learned the "tricks" the hard way--chill layers before icing, make dam to prevent curd seepage, make 4 thin layers instead of 2 thicker ones, use skewers until it is set etc. I love the curd/cream icing and just wondered if the lemon cream will give the same results as curd. This has become one of my favorite cakes.

#184 miladyinsanity

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 10:07 AM

I have made the cake several times using lemon curd--I have learned the "tricks" the hard way--chill layers before icing, make dam to prevent curd seepage, make 4 thin layers instead of 2 thicker ones, use skewers until it is set etc.  I love the curd/cream icing and just wondered if the lemon cream will give the same results as curd.  This has become one of my favorite cakes.

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Oh....I thought the Lemon Cream is a curd? :blink:
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#185 arriba!

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Posted 19 March 2007 - 10:14 AM

Yes, it is a curd. I have not made it and wondered if it would give same results. I think the only difference is in the technique and I would think it would be just as tart, but I don't know that.

#186 miladyinsanity

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 05:04 AM

Yes, it is a curd.  I have not made it and wondered if it would give same results.  I think the only difference is in the technique and I would think it would be just as tart, but I don't know that.

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I'm no curd expert, but it tastes pretty tart to me. Comparable to the Medrich recipe I made before this.
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#187 arriba!

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Posted 20 March 2007 - 10:18 AM

I am planning on making it(cake)this weekend so will probably make the curd earlier. Thanks for your help.

#188 nichi

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Posted 25 March 2007 - 05:48 PM

I wanted to thank you all for this tread and all the info contained herein. As it so happens I had to do a wedding cake this weekend with Lemon Curd filling. Im not really a fan, and as it turns out, it was because of the crap recipe I had.

I did a little tweeking to the Sherry Yard Recipe, doubling the original, adding 1 extra egg yolk, 2 extra table spoons of butter (just cuz butter makes everything betta) and another 1/3 cup of sugar (I guess my lemon tree is a little on the tart side so it was necessary).

It came out pretty thick, like pudding and was wonderful to fill the cake. I have a ton left over so Im making a bunch of goodies to use up the extra.

#189 arriba!

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Posted 25 March 2007 - 06:41 PM

I used the lemon cream to fill 2 cakes this weekend and it worked wonderfully. I spread the cream in 2 pans the same size as the cake, lined with plastic. Froze them, put between split cake layers and iced one with lemon buttercream(Paige Retus'[Olives]recipe and the other with lemon curd mixed with whipped cream. I refrigerated them overnight then attempted to decide which I liked better. Undecided at this point--they are both fabulous! I guess I would call it a draw.

#190 beacheschef

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Posted 29 March 2007 - 06:25 AM

I frequently use lemon curd with my cakes and have found great success when I freeze it for short periods of time.

I have to make sure that I cook it long enough for it to thicken - actually using an instant read thermometer to make sure it hits 170+ degrees. After straining and refrigerating it, I'll freeze it in a plastic container with plastic wrap laying directly on top of the curd.

I've made RLB's lime curd as a filling for coconut cakes - customers like that combo, too. But, I haven't tried any other lime curd recipes.

I've used her orange curd, too, and found it to be soft and sweet, but quite delicious. Mixed with white chocolate mousse, it's a fabulous cake filling!

Does anyone have good recipes for orange and lime curd recipes that they'd like to share?
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#191 priich

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Posted 29 March 2007 - 09:03 AM

Interesting. So none of you use gelatine in your curd ? Am I cheating ?

(from Jan Hedhs recipe):

2 g gelatine
150 g eggs
75 g +75 g sugar
75 g lemon juice
zest from 1.5 lemons
100 g unsalted butter

Soak gelatin in cold water
Whisk egg and 75g sugar to poreuse stage.
Bring zest, the other 75g sugar, butter and lemon juice to a boil.
Pour lemon mixture over egg/sugar and mix.
Pour mixture into a sauce pan or similar and bring gently to a boil while whisking.
Remove pot from heat and whisk till it's very smooth.
Squeeze water out of gelatine sheet, drop it into curd and stir until gelatine has melted.
Strain. Pour directly into tarte or chill rapidly in water bath and cover.

Conversions for the imperial crowd :raz: :

2g gelatine = 1 sheet
150 g eggs = 3 eggs depending on size
150 g sugar = 2/3 cup
75 g lemon juice = 5 tbsp
100 g butter = 7 tbsp

Texture is silk smooth. Consistency is pretty stiff but not wobbly jello-ish, rather soft butter-ish.
Taste could imho be a bit more pronounced, next time I'll probably add some more zest. Couldn't detect metallic taste so amount of sequestrant is enough. Just make sure that high enough temps are reached for the proteins to coagulate.
Scent is light citrusy.

Sorry no pictures. Only have scanner. Spreading curd on the scanner is probably not a great idea.

btw Hi, I'm new here.

Edited by priich, 29 March 2007 - 09:05 AM.


#192 Sethro

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Posted 29 March 2007 - 09:10 AM

Interesting. So none of you use gelatine in your curd ? Am I cheating ?

(from Jan Hedhs recipe):

2 g gelatine
150 g eggs
75 g +75 g sugar
75 g lemon juice
zest from 1.5 lemons
100 g unsalted butter

Soak gelatin in cold water
Whisk egg and 75g sugar to poreuse stage.
Bring zest, the other 75g sugar, butter and lemon juice to a boil.
Pour lemon mixture over egg/sugar and mix.
Pour mixture into a sauce pan or similar and bring gently to a boil while whisking.
Remove pot from heat and whisk till it's very smooth.
Squeeze water out of gelatine sheet, drop it into curd and stir until gelatine has melted.
Strain. Pour directly into tarte or chill rapidly in water bath and cover.

Conversions for the imperial crowd  :raz: :

2g gelatine = 1 sheet
150 g eggs = 3 eggs depending on size
150 g sugar = 2/3 cup
75 g lemon juice = 5 tbsp
100 g butter = 7 tbsp

Texture is silk smooth. Consistency is pretty stiff but not wobbly jello-ish, rather soft butter-ish.
Taste could imho be a bit more pronounced, next time I'll probably add some more zest. Couldn't detect metallic taste so amount of sequestrant is enough. Just make sure that high enough temps are reached for the proteins to coagulate.
Scent is light citrusy.

Sorry no pictures. Only have scanner. Spreading curd on the scanner is probably not a great idea.

btw Hi, I'm new here.

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They spread curd on the scanner at Moto.

Just kidding. heh heh.

I use gelatine sometimes depending on what the application is. I also like to raise it all the way to a boil and then stick blend it. I find the coagulation at that point is enought that it will stand fine at fridge temp without weeping.

#193 miladyinsanity

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Posted 09 April 2007 - 10:31 AM

A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

If I want to sandwich a cake with lemon curd folded into whipped cream, what would be ideal ratios/recipe? Mine appears rather liquid, but it's not yet been in the fridge overnight.

Is it possible for me to fold the curd into a Italian or Swiss Meringue instead of whipped cream? I'm not talking about a buttercream here (I've made it from scratch, and it's not really my favorite frosting), but just the meringue part. I'd be using it to fill/frost cake.

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:
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#194 Sugarshoc

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 11:19 PM

A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:

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If you beat the eggs really well before you add the other ingredients, that will help. Your eggs should be beaten as if you used an immersion blender and the curd will come out nice and smooth.

#195 miladyinsanity

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 08:27 AM

A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:

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If you beat the eggs really well before you add the other ingredients, that will help. Your eggs should be beaten as if you used an immersion blender and the curd will come out nice and smooth.

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Great! I'll try this again next week.
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#196 Patrick S

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 10:32 AM

A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:

View Post


If you beat the eggs really well before you add the other ingredients, that will help. Your eggs should be beaten as if you used an immersion blender and the curd will come out nice and smooth.

View Post


Or, beat the eggs with the sugar before adding the other ingredients. This makes for a more viscous mixture, which helps the egg whites get evenly dispersed. Thinking literally about it, of course, you actually want the egg whites to coagulate to some extent -- that's what forms the gel that makes a curd thicken and become a curd, as opposed to a sauce. You just want the egg to be evenly dispersed before it coagulates, and control the degree to which coagulation occurs.
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#197 miladyinsanity

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 01:38 PM

A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:

View Post


If you beat the eggs really well before you add the other ingredients, that will help. Your eggs should be beaten as if you used an immersion blender and the curd will come out nice and smooth.

View Post


Or, beat the eggs with the sugar before adding the other ingredients. This makes for a more viscous mixture, which helps the egg whites get evenly dispersed. Thinking literally about it, of course, you actually want the egg whites to coagulate to some extent -- that's what forms the gel that makes a curd thicken and become a curd, as opposed to a sauce. You just want the egg to be evenly dispersed before it coagulates, and control the degree to which coagulation occurs.

View Post

That's what I've been doing, actually, but I still got a lot of coagulated egg whites (not curd)--at least, it seemed a lot to me, since it was only the second time that I've made lemon curd. Which was why I asked.
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#198 mukki

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 04:00 PM

A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:

View Post


If you beat the eggs really well before you add the other ingredients, that will help. Your eggs should be beaten as if you used an immersion blender and the curd will come out nice and smooth.

View Post

Or, beat the eggs with the sugar before adding the other ingredients. This makes for a more viscous mixture, which helps the egg whites get evenly dispersed. Thinking literally about it, of course, you actually want the egg whites to coagulate to some extent -- that's what forms the gel that makes a curd thicken and become a curd, as opposed to a sauce. You just want the egg to be evenly dispersed before it coagulates, and control the degree to which coagulation occurs.

View Post

That's what I've been doing, actually, but I still got a lot of coagulated egg whites (not curd)--at least, it seemed a lot to me, since it was only the second time that I've made lemon curd. Which was why I asked.

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Have you tried the Fine Cooking lemon curd recipe? You beat the eggs and sugar with the butter, then cook. I haven't had any problem with coagulation when lemon curd is made this way.

#199 Patrick S

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 04:30 PM

A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:

View Post


If you beat the eggs really well before you add the other ingredients, that will help. Your eggs should be beaten as if you used an immersion blender and the curd will come out nice and smooth.

View Post


Or, beat the eggs with the sugar before adding the other ingredients. This makes for a more viscous mixture, which helps the egg whites get evenly dispersed. Thinking literally about it, of course, you actually want the egg whites to coagulate to some extent -- that's what forms the gel that makes a curd thicken and become a curd, as opposed to a sauce. You just want the egg to be evenly dispersed before it coagulates, and control the degree to which coagulation occurs.

View Post

That's what I've been doing, actually, but I still got a lot of coagulated egg whites (not curd)--at least, it seemed a lot to me, since it was only the second time that I've made lemon curd. Which was why I asked.

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Hmm. What temperature are you cooking your curd to?
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#200 miladyinsanity

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 09:18 PM

A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:

View Post


If you beat the eggs really well before you add the other ingredients, that will help. Your eggs should be beaten as if you used an immersion blender and the curd will come out nice and smooth.

View Post

Or, beat the eggs with the sugar before adding the other ingredients. This makes for a more viscous mixture, which helps the egg whites get evenly dispersed. Thinking literally about it, of course, you actually want the egg whites to coagulate to some extent -- that's what forms the gel that makes a curd thicken and become a curd, as opposed to a sauce. You just want the egg to be evenly dispersed before it coagulates, and control the degree to which coagulation occurs.

View Post

That's what I've been doing, actually, but I still got a lot of coagulated egg whites (not curd)--at least, it seemed a lot to me, since it was only the second time that I've made lemon curd. Which was why I asked.

View Post

Have you tried the Fine Cooking lemon curd recipe? You beat the eggs and sugar with the butter, then cook. I haven't had any problem with coagulation when lemon curd is made this way.

View Post


I made this recipe, and I felt it was too liquid. Maybe I didn't cook enough?

A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:

View Post


If you beat the eggs really well before you add the other ingredients, that will help. Your eggs should be beaten as if you used an immersion blender and the curd will come out nice and smooth.

View Post


Or, beat the eggs with the sugar before adding the other ingredients. This makes for a more viscous mixture, which helps the egg whites get evenly dispersed. Thinking literally about it, of course, you actually want the egg whites to coagulate to some extent -- that's what forms the gel that makes a curd thicken and become a curd, as opposed to a sauce. You just want the egg to be evenly dispersed before it coagulates, and control the degree to which coagulation occurs.

View Post

That's what I've been doing, actually, but I still got a lot of coagulated egg whites (not curd)--at least, it seemed a lot to me, since it was only the second time that I've made lemon curd. Which was why I asked.

View Post


Hmm. What temperature are you cooking your curd to?

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I have no idea. My thermometer doesn't take temps below 190F. Note to self: Why didn't you look more closely at it before you bought it?
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#201 Aria B.

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 01:46 PM

Has anyone tried the lemon curd recipe in Dorie Greenspan's latest book? She also has a lemon cream recipe in the same book. The book says that the lemon cream has more tang and less butteriness. This confuses me since her cream has more than three times as much butter as her curd. I did purposely post this here here rather on the "Baking From My Home to Yours" thread, just in case you lemon curd lovers have tried her recipe. Thanks.
Aria in Oregon

#202 Patrick S

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 02:15 PM

I have no idea. My thermometer doesn't take temps below 190F. Note to self: Why didn't you look more closely at it before you bought it?

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Well, if the problem is not failure to disperse the eggs into the other ingredients --and I doubt it is if you are mixing the eggs with the sugar first-- then the coagulated bits are probably a result of overcooking.

Edited by Patrick S, 30 July 2007 - 02:17 PM.

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#203 Sugarshoc

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Posted 31 July 2007 - 10:55 PM

Are you cooking the curd directly in the pot or over a water bath? I cooked mine over a water bath which is more gentle.

#204 miladyinsanity

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 01:52 PM

Waterbath. I've only made it twice, so I'm not yet ready to do it without.

I shall attempt this again.
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#205 arriba!

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 05:59 PM

Aria B--I have made Dorie's lemon cream several times and find it addicting! I don't think it has a buttery mouthfeel--I would just call it creamy, lemony, divine.

#206 Shel_B

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Posted 01 November 2007 - 10:06 AM

There are a few lemon curd recipes in my files. One calls for using whole eggs, another for using only egg yolks, and another that asks for X-number of yolks PLUS X-number of whole eggs. Apart from the eggs, the recipes are reasonably similar. So, what taste/texture differences might I expect as a result of using the different egg variations?

Shel

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#207 highchef

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Posted 02 November 2007 - 08:23 AM

see post below...

Edited by highchef, 02 November 2007 - 08:39 AM.


#208 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 02 November 2007 - 08:26 AM

1 c juice from about 6 lemons..(ha..took 9 for me, bad lemons??)
1 teaspoon powdered gelatin

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Did you warm the lemons? If you put them whole into the microwave for about 25 seconds, one at a time, you will find you get a lot more juice. I almost always need less lemons than the recipe calls for to get the juice.
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#209 highchef

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Posted 02 November 2007 - 08:38 AM

It's amazing that the word 'gelatin' did not appear until page 11 on this thread!!
So, for all of you who are making the curd for a cake, I refer you to the 'Ultimate Lemon Layer Cake" from April 07 of Cooks Illustrated mag. The recipe is nicely tart, and sets up perfectly. I made the cake as written and the layers were light enough (4) that there was no oozing. I will be using the curd in tartlet shells for an engagement party this weekend. I'm going to blind bake (and add the beaten eggwhite as described upthread..thanks) and then fill. this curd is designed to set firm, so it should be perfect after a flick of the offset spatula.

1 c juice from about 6 lemons..(ha..took 9 for me, bad lemons??)
1 teaspoon powdered gelatin
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
4 large eggs
6 yolks (if making the cake, you need the whites...if you want that recipe, let me know)
1 stick us butter cut into cubes and frozen (I do not know why. since I keep cut up sticks of butter in ziplocs in the freezer for crusts I just used some of that...have no idea what would happen if you used just cold butter. Must have something to do with bringing the temp down without using a water bath).

sprinkle gelatin over 1 tablespoon of lemon juice in small bowl. heat juice sugar and salt in nonreactive saucepan over medium heat until sugar dissolves and it's hot..not boiling.pour hot lemon mix over the eggs (whisked in a lorge nonreactive bowl) SLOWLY, WHILE WHISKING ALL THE WHILE...it helps to have help with this part. Then return mix to the suacepan and heat while stirring to 170 or thick enough to 'leave a trail'. remove from heat and stir in gelatin mix and stir until dissolved. stir in butter chunks until mixed, strain into nonreactive bowl and cover directly on surface with plastic wrap for at least 4 hours. I did it night before for cake and just had to fold it a few times to bring back to spreading form.
It's not a lot of gelatin and it gives the curd just the tightness it needs not to creep.
I've also made 3 trays of marshmallows this week so I'm a little up to my eyeballs in the gelatin recipes. Actually that's why I tried this recipe, I already had 8 little orange boxes. Sometimes things just go in your favor, or flavor in this case!

#210 highchef

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Posted 02 November 2007 - 08:40 AM

1 c juice from about 6 lemons..(ha..took 9 for me, bad lemons??)
1 teaspoon powdered gelatin

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Did you warm the lemons? If you put them whole into the microwave for about 25 seconds, one at a time, you will find you get a lot more juice. I almost always need less lemons than the recipe calls for to get the juice.

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yes, damn near burned my hands doing so. Ever get a lemon with about a 1/2 inch of pith??