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The Aviation


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213 replies to this topic

#91 Kent Wang

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Posted 25 June 2007 - 08:18 AM

I also see the Aviation as a really effective "gateway cocktail," in that it's inherent ingredient simplicity can show people maraschino's contributions to a drink.  It's so easy to start from there and move someone on to a more complex, but similar in some respect, cocktail like the Last Word.

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While this may be true for some people, I personally found the funkiness of the maraschino off-putting. I still prefer the Last Word to Aviation as it is balanced by the Chartreuse.

#92 C. sapidus

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Posted 26 June 2007 - 09:19 PM

My Aviation is 2 oz beefeater or Tanq, 3/4 oz lemon, 1/2 oz luxardo, 1/4 oz simple (1 to 1).  I like to thow a few dashes of orange bitters to make a Casino.

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Mrs. C loved this version (minus the orange bitters, which we don’t have). I like fairly tart drinks, so the 3:1:1 version with a small spoonful of simple syrup made from "sugar in the raw" is my favorite so far.

#93 TBoner

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Posted 26 June 2007 - 09:45 PM

I've enjoyed two different versions of the Aviation since finally finding some Luxardo maraschino locally. The 4:1:1 went over well with me and my guests a few nights ago, but I preferred a 3:1:1 ratio for myself. Tart drinks are a great thing IMO, especially in the summer. That said, either one is a great cocktail, and will doubtless be served many times at my house in the future.
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#94 Dan Ryan

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Posted 27 June 2007 - 10:08 AM

Well, this is the way I like it:

2½ shots gin
1½ shots lemon juice
½ shot maraschino (I use Maraska)
1 spoon crème de violette

where a shot is 25 ml.

Gives a tart yet rounded drink, with a good whack of gin. A few of these and you know about it...

#95 eas

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Posted 27 June 2007 - 10:46 AM

Of all the variations I've had over these past few months, my favorite so far stems from the recommendation of Robert Hess, to use the brandy soaked cherries in lieu of the marascino liqueur. There's slighty more Violette here for balance in the aromatics. Robert was right about the challenge with finding true brandy-soaked cherries.

2 oz. Gin
1/2 oz. Lemon Juice
1/2 oz. Crème de Violette
1 brandy-soaked cherry

shake with ice, strain into a cocktail glass. gently press dry the cherry before garnish (unless you like the brandy taste).

#96 slkinsey

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Posted 27 June 2007 - 10:50 AM

eas, I think there needs to be maraschino in there for that to be an Aviation. The ur-Aviation did contain some crème de violette, but I think the primary modifier was still maraschino.
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#97 Nathan

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Posted 27 June 2007 - 10:58 AM

Of all the variations I've had over these past few months, my favorite so far stems from the recommendation of Robert Hess, to use the brandy soaked cherries in lieu of the marascino liqueur.  There's slighty more Violette here for balance in the aromatics.  Robert was right about the challenge with finding true brandy-soaked cherries.

2 oz. Gin
1/2 oz. Lemon Juice
1/2 oz. Crème de Violette
1 brandy-soaked cherry

shake with ice, strain into a cocktail glass. gently press dry the cherry before garnish (unless you like the brandy taste).

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This looks like a wonderful drink and I'll try it...but it needs a name.

#98 eas

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Posted 27 June 2007 - 11:36 AM

eas, I think there needs to be maraschino in there for that to be an Aviation.  The ur-Aviation did contain some crème de violette, but I think the primary modifier was still maraschino.

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Maraschino liqueur or the marascino cherry? Robert's last line from his piece in the Spirit World was "If you can find true brandy soaked cherries, I always recommend going that route instead of using the modern maraschino cherry. Another option is to buy dried bing cherries, and reconstitute them in brandy."

So if not Aviation, maybe call it a "Skyline".

...http://www.oldenburgvanbruggen.com/spoonbridge.htm (sorry, couldn't resist)

#99 johnder

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Posted 27 June 2007 - 11:40 AM

I think he was suggesting adding a real brandy cherry as a garnish, but the recipe he posted still has maraschino liquor in it, as seen here.

I personally never garnish an aviation, but if it did want/need a garnish, a true maraschino cherry (like the great luxardo brand) would be a good fit.

john
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#100 Nathan

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Posted 27 June 2007 - 12:57 PM

eas, I think there needs to be maraschino in there for that to be an Aviation.  The ur-Aviation did contain some crème de violette, but I think the primary modifier was still maraschino.

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Maraschino liqueur or the marascino cherry? Robert's last line from his piece in the Spirit World was "If you can find true brandy soaked cherries, I always recommend going that route instead of using the modern maraschino cherry. Another option is to buy dried bing cherries, and reconstitute them in brandy."

So if not Aviation, maybe call it a "Skyline".

...http://www.oldenburgvanbruggen.com/spoonbridge.htm (sorry, couldn't resist)

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he's talking about the garnish....not the ingredients!

now that I think about it...what you're drinking is actually a Blue Moon....(well, the original used Creme Yvette but Violette was often substituted...as with the Avation)

#101 eje

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Posted 27 June 2007 - 01:12 PM

he's talking about the garnish....not the ingredients!

now that I think about it...what you're drinking is actually a Blue Moon....(well, the original used Creme Yvette but Violette was often substituted...as with the Avation)

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Oh, duh, can't believe I didn't think of that. I knew it seemed familiar.

Interesting, though, that there are 3 Blue Moon cocktails in the Cocktaidb, and only one contains lemon.

Blue Moon is just Gin and Creme Yvette. The first "Blue Moon Variation" is Gin, Lemon Juice, Creme Yvette, and egg white. The other "Blue Moon Variation" is Gin, Creme Yvette, dry vermouth, and orange bitters.

The egg white and lemon Blue Moon is sounds pretty good to me...
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#102 Nathan

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Posted 27 June 2007 - 01:57 PM

interesting..the Blue Moon recipe I'm familiar with is gin, Yvette or Violette and lemon juice...no egg white.

the third recipe is quite similar to a Jupiter Cocktail.

#103 eje

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Posted 17 July 2007 - 05:01 PM

I was scanning the Savoy Cocktail Book, and thinking about the Ensslin Aviation vs. The Savoy Cocktail Book Aviation, and one thing lept out at me.

With most of the Pre-Prohibition cocktails from Hugo Ensslin or Judge Jr. the recipes are written verbatim. For example:

Casino Cocktail

2 Dashes Maraschino
2 Dashes Orange Bitters
2 Dashes Lemon Juice
1 Glass Old Tom Gin

Stir well and add cherry.


-or-

Brandy Gump
1 Hooker of Brandy
The Juice of 1 Lemon
2 Dashes Grenadine
Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.


Whereas the Aviation has been Savoy-ized:

Aviation Cocktail

2/3 Dry Gin
1/3 Lemon Juice
2 Dashes Maraschino

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.


Unfortunately, I don't have Ensslin to see if the original recipe was written in fractions. I suspect not (Splificator?).

I dunno what that means. Maybe that the Savoy version of the cocktail was active and being made to those proportions when the Savoy Cocktail Book was compiled, unlike some of the other older cocktails written verbatim?

There are plenty of cocktails with violet liqueur in the book, so it doesn't seem like availability would have been an issue. Also, unlike some of the other mistakes, they did not correct the recipe in the "New and Additional Cocktails section" of the second edition.
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#104 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 17 July 2007 - 05:59 PM

I was scanning the Savoy Cocktail Book, and thinking about the Ensslin Aviation vs. The Savoy Cocktail Book Aviation, and one thing lept out at me.

...

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That is some very interesting detective work indeed. Can't wait to see where this leads.
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#105 eje

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Posted 17 July 2007 - 08:01 PM

Curses! Mr. Wondrich informed me that I was incorrect!

Or to quote him, "Alas, sometimes sharp reasoning and keen observation founder on the rocks of fact."

The full Enslinn recipe is as follows:

AVIATION COCKTAIL
1/3 Lemon Juice
2/3 El Bart Gin
2 dashes Maraschino
2 dashes Creme de Violette
Shake well in a mixing glass with cracked ice, strain and serve.


---
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#106 lefti_99

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 09:14 AM

does anyone know why the Luxardo Maraschino bottle is wrapped in straw? I suspect that it was originally intended to protect the bottle whilst travelling long distances, is that correct?

#107 Snowy is dead

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Posted 10 November 2007 - 12:04 AM

Just bumping this thread to see if there is a "preferred" recipe for an Aviation with creme de violette. What seems to work? I, unfortunately, have to use stock marachino. I'm not sure who carries luxardo in MA. The luxardo I do have isn't going anywhere near work... :raz:

I'm typically using beefeater or plymouth for gin, .5 to .75 lemon, .5 marachino. I'm thinking .5 violette? I'll report back on what the creme de violette brand is.

Sean

#108 Kent Wang

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Posted 10 November 2007 - 12:18 AM

does anyone know why the Luxardo Maraschino bottle is wrapped in straw? I suspect that it was originally intended to protect the bottle whilst travelling long distances, is that correct?

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There are also a few rums and a Ypioca (cachaca) that are wrapped in straw.

#109 notahumanissue

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Posted 10 November 2007 - 11:53 AM

Just bumping this thread to see if there is a "preferred" recipe for  an Aviation with creme de violette.  What seems to work?  I, unfortunately, have to use stock marachino.  I'm not sure who carries luxardo in MA.  The luxardo I do have isn't going anywhere near work... :raz:

I'm typically using beefeater or plymouth for gin, .5 to .75 lemon, .5 marachino.  I'm thinking .5 violette?  I'll report back on what the creme de violette brand is.

Sean

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The violette cuts into the maraschino ratio as the drink's sweetening agent. I've most often seen it as 0.25 violette and 0.25 maraschino for an Aviation No. 1.

#110 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 11:22 AM

Just bumping this thread to see if there is a "preferred" recipe for  an Aviation with creme de violette.  What seems to work?  I, unfortunately, have to use stock marachino.  I'm not sure who carries luxardo in MA.  The luxardo I do have isn't going anywhere near work... :raz:

I'm typically using beefeater or plymouth for gin, .5 to .75 lemon, .5 marachino.  I'm thinking .5 violette?  I'll report back on what the creme de violette brand is.

Sean

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I like Wondrich's portions of 2 oz gin, .75 of lemon, and 1 tsp each of maraschino and violette. I much prefer the dry Aviation recipes for the suaveness and the effectiveness at restraining the power of the liqueurs used, both of which can take over if used carelessly.

-Andy
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#111 eje

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 12:10 PM

It really does depend a lot on the Maraschino and Violette you are using.

The brands of both vary widely in their sweetness and intensity.

I always go with the classic 2-1 ratio of Gin to Lemon.

Using the Luxardo and Rothman & Winter, I find a teaspoon of each and a teaspoon of simple syrup is the most appealing to me and most guests.

With Stock or Maraska, you can probably get away with a bit more Maraschino and skip the simple. I don't think they are quite as intense as the Luxardo.
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If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
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#112 slkinsey

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Posted 12 November 2007 - 07:59 AM

I like my Aviation at 2 ounces of Tanqueray to a half-ounce each of lemon juice and Luxardo maraschino. If I'm using R&W violette, I'll dial back the Luxardo to 2 teaspoons and drizzle in around a quarter ounce of violette after the drink is poured.
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#113 Snowy is dead

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 09:59 AM

The Violette is indeed Rothman and Winter.

If I can't get Luxardo, is there another good option besides the stock version? I'm not particularly fond of it, it seems too medicinal for me.


edit: I just saw Maraska mentioned above. must have missed it. Is it Italian?

Edited by Snowy is dead, 13 November 2007 - 10:07 AM.


#114 eje

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 10:09 AM

I usually only see the Luxardo in stores so haven't really tried other brands to give an opinion.

I believe the only three producers of Maraschino are Luxardo, Maraska, and Stock.

I've heard you can get the Maraska in some San Francisco liquor stores. I might have to give it a try next, as my bottle of Luxardo is getting low, and I really should have an opinion on this.

edit - Maraska is from Croatia:

Maraska Liqueurs

Edited by eje, 13 November 2007 - 10:10 AM.

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#115 slkinsey

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 11:20 AM

Maraska is a great product, and some people prefer it over Luxardo (I am not one). It's overall sweeter and less "funky."
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#116 Splificator

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 01:28 PM

Maraska is a great product, and some people prefer it over Luxardo (I am not one).  It's overall sweeter and less "funky."

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I find Maraska to be much closer to a sweetened kirschwasser than to the gloriously weird concatenation of funk that is the Luxardo. Not band by any means, though. But it definitely tastes like cherries.
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#117 slkinsey

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 03:10 PM

Which do you think best reflects the product used in classic cocktails?
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#118 Splificator

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 03:44 PM

Which do you think best reflects the product used in classic cocktails?

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AFAIK, Luxardo was always the standard (the brand goes back 150+ years). More research needed, though.
aka David Wondrich

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#119 Splificator

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Posted 13 November 2007 - 04:11 PM

Ok, so some quick spadework yields the following:

LITTELL'S LIVING AGE. No. 262-- 26 MAY, 1849.
MANUFACTURE OF MARASCHINO.
The principal manufactory in Zara [the capital of Dalmatia] is that of maraschino, the liquor made from the marasca or black cherry, which is grown mostly in the neighborhood of Almissa, between Spalato and Macarsca. Bordeaux is not more famous for its wines than Zara for its liquors; and in the manufacture of them they surpass all other places.... The fruit is picked and skinned in June and July. Drioli and some of the houses pretend to have secrets for mixing the proportions, which are transmitted to the women of the family from generation to generation; but, in truth, it is like the secret of the protean Jean Maria Farina of Cologne, the true secret being the possession of adequate capital and a current sale. The best maraschino is that of Drioli, Luxardo, and Kreglianovich. The maraschino of the first of these is reckoned by the native Dalmatians as the best of all; but it is dear. Luxardo makes good maraschino, and has a large sale; the maraschino of Kreglianovich is very good in quality and moderate in price, but not strong enough for the English and Russian taste; for while the Sicilians prefer weak and sweet maraschino, a more powerful liquor is requisite for the English, Dutch, and Russian. There are altogether about a dozen distilleries in the town; and several of the proprietors have made handsome fortunes. --From The Highlands and Islands of the Adriatic.[/I]

Drioli (the oldest maker, Francesco Drioli having got into the business in 1759) and indeed all the maraschino distilleries were bombed to smithereens in World War II. After the war, Drioli and Luxardo relocated to the Veneto. Drioli shut its doors in the early 1970s. Luxardo soldiers on.
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#120 notahumanissue

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 01:03 PM

And from my understanding, Maraska was a postwar, communist era start up in what used to be Zara, bottled and labeled under the name Luxardo (which had moved its distillary to what solidified as northern Italy). Through a cross-Iron Curtain legal battle, the name was eventually changed to Maraska.

I'd like to believe there's some cloak and dagger romance floating around in the story. Somewhere.