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Artificial Sweetener Synergy


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#1 scott123

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Posted 07 May 2004 - 11:18 AM

I have heard a few references to the synergistic effect achieved when different sweeteners are combined. I know it occurs when you combine splenda with acesulfame K but I was wondering which other combinations do this as well.

Splenda with stevia?
Stevia with acesulfame K?
Stevia with polyols?
Splenda with polyols?
Acesulfame K with polyols?

Also, besides knowing whether or not synergism occurs, I'm also interested as to how much additional sweetness is generated.

#2 chefpeon

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Posted 07 May 2004 - 11:44 AM

Wow.....I had never heard of such "sweetener synergy". Very interesting!

My question is, what would you be trying to achieve with this synergy?
A low sugar, highly sweet baked good?
I've NEVER had good luck with artificial sweeteners.....I'm always looking for ways
to use them because in todays calorie conscious Atkins lovin' society, if you don't
jump on the low-this-low-that-bandwagon, you lose business.
I am just never that happy with the end result when I bake low sugar low fat.

If this synergy would help me create a low sugar baked item that actually TASTED GOOD,
I'd be anxious to know about it!

:wub: Annie

#3 kthull

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Posted 07 May 2004 - 11:55 AM

Try Whey Low as a low cal, low carb, low glycemic sugar substitute. It's about $5/lb in bulk and it works nearly identically to sugar. I've tested quite a few artificial sweeteners and the like, but this beats them all out hands down and there's nothing artificial about it. No aftertaste, caramelize it, make candy, ice cream, baked goods, you name it.

And anytime I tell someone about it they say, "Man that's expensive...Splenda is cheaper." But I just saw that huge bag of Splenda, all 10 ounces of it for like $8. I think people see a big bag and think they're getting a lot since it claims the sweetness of xx pounds. Hah. Try explaining that to your cakes and cookies when they don't have the bulk that sugar adds. Heck, the Splenda web site even says you'll probably get a lower yield and the few applications it's intended for.

Whey Low...you have to try it. (And as I've said before, no I'm not on their payroll.)

#4 scott123

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Posted 07 May 2004 - 12:57 PM

Whey Low...you have to try it. (And as I've said before, no I'm not on their payroll.)

Kevin, the moment you are anyone else proves to me the partial digestion claims of whey low, I'm buying some. Not the glycemic impact, mind you. That I can believe. But the caloric/ketogenic impact, that's what I'd like to see some good solid research on.

#5 scott123

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Posted 07 May 2004 - 01:22 PM

Wow.....I had never heard of such "sweetener synergy". Very interesting!

My question is, what would you be trying to achieve with this synergy?
A low sugar, highly sweet baked good?
I've NEVER had good luck with artificial sweeteners.....I'm always looking for ways
to use them because in todays calorie conscious Atkins lovin' society, if you don't
jump on the low-this-low-that-bandwagon, you lose business.
I am just never that happy with the end result when I bake low sugar low fat.

If this synergy would help me create a low sugar baked item that actually TASTED GOOD,
I'd be anxious to know about it!

:wub: Annie

Annie, artificial sweeteners that synergize when combined are a huge aspect of low carb prepared foods. The commercial entities are monopolizing on this phenomenon and home chefs are beginning to become aware of it.

Basically, the way synergy works is this:

1 cup sugar = 1 cup powdered splenda = 1 cup acesulfame K

When you combine the artificial sweeteners, the amounts needed to create the same sweetness drop by one half.

1/4 C. splenda + 1/4 C. acesulfame K = 1 cup sugar

Less of both sweeteners = less aftertaste/lower cost

That 200% increase in sweetness is only hearsay. There is a substantial gain from combining, though, whatever that may be.

One almost requires a degree in rocket science to create good low carb baked goods. This is still very unexplored territory. BTW, low carb baking involves no sugar but high fat, not low sugar low fat. You just want to stay away from shortening.

#6 chefpeon

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Posted 07 May 2004 - 01:32 PM

1/4 C. splenda + 1/4 C. acesulfame K = 1 cup sugar

Less of both sweeteners = less aftertaste/lower cost



Yowza! I like both of those concepts! Anything to reduce that horrible aftertaste!
Thanks for the info......and just to clarify, acesulfame K is Nutra-Sweet, right?

And I'm also going to try that Whey-Low stuff......thanks for the tip on that!
:wub: Annie

#7 NulloModo

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Posted 07 May 2004 - 02:52 PM

Why do you want to stay away from shortening?

I have found a good synergy is splenda and saccharin.

Edited by NulloModo, 07 May 2004 - 02:52 PM.

He don't mix meat and dairy,
He don't eat humble pie,
So sing a miserere
And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

#8 scott123

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Posted 08 May 2004 - 07:27 AM

1/4 C. splenda + 1/4 C. acesulfame K = 1 cup sugar

Less of both sweeteners = less aftertaste/lower cost


Yowza! I like both of those concepts! Anything to reduce that horrible aftertaste!
Thanks for the info......and just to clarify, acesulfame K is Nutra-Sweet, right?

And I'm also going to try that Whey-Low stuff......thanks for the tip on that!
:wub: Annie

Nutrasweet is aspartame. Acesulfame K is sold under the brand name Sunnett.

Nutrasweet and splenda may have a synergy, although nutrasweet is not all that popular with the low carbing crowd.

#9 scott123

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Posted 08 May 2004 - 07:31 AM

Why do you want to stay away from shortening?

I have found a good synergy is splenda and saccharin.

Shortening is trans fatty acids. Although Atkins has been publicizing the dangers of trans fatty acids for quite some time, it has only been in the last year or two that the rest of the nutritional world has chimed in. Hydrogenated oil is bad news.

#10 NulloModo

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Posted 08 May 2004 - 10:39 AM

Why do you want to stay away from shortening?

I have found a good synergy is splenda and saccharin.

Shortening is trans fatty acids. Although Atkins has been publicizing the dangers of trans fatty acids for quite some time, it has only been in the last year or two that the rest of the nutritional world has chimed in. Hydrogenated oil is bad news.

Oh, gotcha, so it is just more of a general health issue than one pertaining to weight-loss.

Which, btw, is the same reason that nutrasweet isn't popular on Atkins (also had a tendancy to cause sugar cravings).

If you are really baking to cater towards hardcore LC needs, avoid the granulated splenda, and use the liquid form. The Granulated is suspended in a Dextrose base, which has a carb content, while the liquid is pure sucralose.
He don't mix meat and dairy,
He don't eat humble pie,
So sing a miserere
And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

#11 mags

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Posted 08 May 2004 - 01:51 PM

I'm another huge fan of Whey Low. Particularly when making desserts to share with other people, I won't use any other artifical sweetener (and I think I've tried them all). To my tongue, it is a near-perfect mimic of sugar, and it also has great functionality -- caramelizes beautifully, etc. Many polyols (sugar alcohols) taste ok, but they can have produce seriously bad GI problems -- think many hours in the bathroom -- if consumed in quantity, and the problem is, "quantity" appears to differ from person to person, so there's no way of telling if your maltitol-sweetened brownie is going to give 3 out of 5 customers a very unpleasant night. Which would not be good for business.

Be aware that neither Sweet n Low nor Equal is heat-stable, so if you cook with them -- though I don't know why on earth anyone would -- their "sweetness" will effectively disappear.

Finally, I would STRONGLY STRONGLY recommend looking at some recipes/cookbooks that have been produced by the low-carb community, rather than by non-low-carbers trying to cash in on the current trend. First, people outside the community often don't understand the needs of low-carbers: they'll substitute Splenda for sugar in a recipe, and then go on to specify 2 cups of flour. Second, those outside the community who have made some efforts to understand the basics (ok, flour = bad) typically try a single-item substitution; they'll take a generic recipe for cookies, say, and substitute Splenda and soy flour for sugar and wheat flour. Yccchh. Tastes disgusting. Just as a combination of artificial sweeteners can produce a synergistic sweetening effect, a combo of flour-substitutes can often produce a MUCH tastier cookie or pie crust or brownie than any one alone. Some of the flour-substitutes that are frequently used in LC cooking include:

vital wheat gluten (essentially wheat "protein," stripped of all starch)
almond flour or other nut flours (no chestnut -- too high in carbs)
protien powder (can be derived from rice, whey, soy)
wheat protein isolate
inulin (which also has sweetening properties)
wheat bran
soy flour (careful -- this stuff can taste nasty if it's not adulterated)
vegetable gums (guar gum, etc.)
oat flour (relatively high in carbs, but quite a bit lower than wheat flour)
flaxseed meal

Take a look at April Fields' "101 Low-Carb and Sugar-Free Dessert Recipes" for some ideas about low-carb baking. (I'm not crazy about her recipes from a sweetening POV -- she relies almost entirely on maltitol and commercial, Splenda-sweetened syrups -- but she's fairly savvy about making substitutions for flour.) I think her website is fabulousfoods.com. Alternatively, look at some of the websites frequented by folks in the LC community -- try lowcarbluxury.com or lowcarbtransformation.com -- most of which have extensive recipes. I'm not at all suggesting that you copy the recipes -- though many people in the LC community are good, inventive cooks, they're mostly amateurs, and you're a pro. But these people do have extensive experience working with the sometimes oddball ingredients that go into making the difference between a baked good -- a cookie, a muffin, whatever -- that both tastes good and meets dieters' needs, and one that doesn't really do either.

#12 CompassRose

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Posted 09 May 2004 - 10:21 AM

Splenda with Stevia powder works very well for me. I avoid any kind of sugar alcohol like the plague, since they have *ahem* very unfortunate effects on me at any dose. Nor do I like acesulfame-K, as it seems to "trigger" me.

A very small amount of any sort of real sugar, dry or liquid, works miracles with Splenda, as well. As do "lower impact" sugars such as brown rice syrup and agave nectar, or even the addition of fruit (grated apple, pureed banana...).

But I am not a hardcore low-carber; I carb-cycle and (apart from the Splenda) try to stick with "clean carbs". Splenda Liquid isn't available in Canada, to my knowledge. I'm fond of Splenda Granular because, among other things, it will allow egg whites to meringue.

I'm interested in the Whey Low. I wonder if I could get it here? Like scott123, though, I'd like to see some hard proof of the caloric impact, I think.

#13 mags

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Posted 10 May 2004 - 01:50 AM

I'm interested in the Whey Low. I wonder if I could get it here? Like scott123, though, I'd like to see some hard proof of the caloric impact, I think.

You might want to email the company. Just go to the website -- www.wheylow.com -- and I think they have a "contact us" button. Josh Wheedon from WheyLow did a Q&A here a few months back, and he was very responsive and a nice guy.

#14 SeleneSue

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Posted 12 May 2004 - 09:19 AM

If you are really baking to cater towards hardcore LC needs, avoid the granulated splenda, and use the liquid form. The Granulated is suspended in a Dextrose base, which has a carb content, while the liquid is pure sucralose.

Splenda.com [USA] has a recipe page: http://www.splenda.c...pes/library.inc

Unfortunately, straight liquid Sucrolose in a carb-free no-filler liquid form is not available in the US from the Splenda people. Don't know why.
Call and pester them until they offer it here: 1-800-561-0070

I do find some at a website called Sweetzfree. Pretty expensive though; $16 USD for 1 ounce, although a little goes a very long way, they describe 1 ounce as 24 cups sugar equivalent.

Flavored syrups =are= available however. Torani and Da Vinci are readily available in major supermarkets and wherever fancy flavored cappacino is served. Also, see a wide selection of flavors at Nature's Flavors, including a couple of neutral syrups which will probably fill the bill: http://www.naturesflavors.com/

Sweet dreams!

:biggrin: Susan