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#331 helenjp

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 06:20 AM

Leeks are hard to find in Japan. If you do spot one, it will be calling itself a poronegi or a riiki/riiku.

Ordinary naganegi don't soften enough on cooking to substitute - they are a slightly different plant, actually. Best bet would be the short, stubby Shimonita negi.

#332 Blether

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 06:31 AM

It's soup time around these parts, and I want to try my hand at leek and potato soup!

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Just use your normal supermarket negi. You can leave out the coarse leaf tops if it bugs you - I started out being that fussy, but these days I just use the whole thing.

With due respect to Helen, I find they soften up fine, gently sweated in oil for 10 or 15 minutes before I bung in the stock & spuds.

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.


#333 torakris

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 03:01 PM

I have only seen leeks in International supermarkets in Tokyo and they are usually about 700 to 800yen for 1! Normally they are labeled in katakana as riiki but I have seen them once or twice as poronegi.

I make potato-leek soup quite a bit (both hot and cold versions) and I always use the plain old supermarket naganegi with no problem.

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#334 prasantrin

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 04:37 PM

Thanks! I'll pass on the leeks (Y700! I need to save that money for Thai rice!), and look for shimonita negi first, and if that fails, I'll go for the naganegi and just sweat them a bit longer. I wish I had a nice little farm nearby that would sell cheap vegetables--they've all sold out to build apartment buildings. :sad:

When researching shimonita negi, I found http://washokufood.b...anegi-leek.html . It'll give me some options for other leek substitutes if I ever decide to look past naganegi.

#335 I8U8

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Posted 17 December 2008 - 06:21 PM

Or what is sold in supermarkets around me as エシャロット?  (Which I thought were shallots, but they look more like large green onions than the shallots I know, so I thought they might be leeks).

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For what it's worth,

In the 1950s エシャロット was given to ラッキョウ for marketing purposes. Scientific name, Allium chinense.

Leeks (Allium porrum) are sold under the names of ニラネギ, リーキ, せいようねぎ and in some cases, alluding to the scientific name, ポロねぎ (Porro is also the Italian name).
Regards,

Peter

#336 prasantrin

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Posted 22 October 2009 - 11:08 PM

Are むきごま just untoasted sesame seeds? Or are they different somehow that regular goma? (In the pictures, they just look untoasted, but otherwise look the same.)

#337 Hiroyuki

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Posted 22 October 2009 - 11:24 PM

Are むきごま just untoasted sesame seeds? Or are they different somehow that regular goma? (In the pictures, they just look untoasted, but otherwise look the same.)

Untosted? In the pictures? What pictures? むきごま = Dehulled sesame seeds, right?

#338 prasantrin

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Posted 22 October 2009 - 11:35 PM


Are むきごま just untoasted sesame seeds? Or are they different somehow that regular goma? (In the pictures, they just look untoasted, but otherwise look the same.)

Untosted? In the pictures? What pictures? むきごま = Dehulled sesame seeds, right?


Ah--no hulls? I was going to get these むきごま to make sesame paste. The other kind they sell are just labelled 白ごま and they looked a little more browned, so I thought they might be toasted while むきごま might be untoasted.

I guess I'll have to get my sesame seeds elsewhere. I don't need 1 kg of sesame seeds, and the 白ごま only comes in 1 kg packages!

#339 Hiroyuki

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Posted 22 October 2009 - 11:46 PM

Thanks for the links. It's now clear what mukigoma are.
White sesame seeds with their hypodermis removed.

I usually buy a 1-kg bag because it's economical and I like sesame seeds!

#340 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 02:01 PM

Hi I ordered a product from Rakuten, does the following mean they arent sending it due they dont ship internationally?

-----------------
'このたびお買上げありがとうございます。
記載しています通り国際便は準備中のためお届けができませんのでご了承下さい。
来年度より予定しておりますのでご了承下さい。
美と健康のバイタミンワールド
URL: http://www.rakuten.co.jp/k-vitamin/
お問い合わせ osanai.akira@rouge.plala.or.jp
    TEL 078-252-0250 / FAX 078-252-0251
    WEB SHOP店長:長内 章

-----------------------

TY
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#341 Blether

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 02:52 PM

Hi I ordered a product from Rakuten, does the following mean they arent sending it due they dont ship internationally?


Yes, but it also says they are preparing to start international shipments from next year.

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.


#342 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 03:48 PM

http://en.item.rakut...-bafa/10007637/

Can anyone please tell me which flavor is which color?

TYIA

Edited by GlorifiedRice, 14 November 2009 - 03:49 PM.

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#343 prasantrin

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 03:58 PM

Purple is sesame, yellow is okara, and orange is konnyaku.

All the flavours are listed in hiragana, which is pretty easy to learn to read. That and katakana would help you a lot if you're going to continue purchasing from Japanese websites. (Learning the meanings of basic kanji in addition to those would help even more. You don't even have to learn the readings, just basic recognition.)

#344 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 15 November 2009 - 08:48 AM

Prasantrin?
I wish I could get anything to stick in my brain nowadays, but unfortunately my brains far too spent from stress and anxiety to even read a book.
:(
Wawa Sizzli FTW!

#345 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 27 May 2010 - 09:08 AM

Ricestrecher.jpg

Can someone please tell me the directions here?

Thanks in advance
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#346 Hiroyuki

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Posted 27 May 2010 - 01:30 PM

Mannanhikari gohan with calories reduced by 33%

- For 2 go of cooked rice

1. Wash 1 go of rice.
1 go of rice = approx. 150 g of rice

Do not wash Mannanhikari.

2. Drain rice, and add 1 bag (75 g) of this product.

3. Add water to the pot up to the 2-go level, stir slightly, and cook in a normal way.

Note: If you cook in a pot not a rice cooker
Amount of water: 480 cc

- For 3 go of cooked rice

1.5 go of uncooked rice + 1.5 bag (113 g) of this product + water up to the 3 go level

Note: If you cook in a pot not a rice cooker
Amount of water: 720 cc

Mannanhikari gohan wth calories reduced by 25%

- For 3 go of cooked rice

2 go of uncooked rice + 1 bag (75 g) of this product + water up to the 3 go level

Note: If you cook in a pot not a rice cooker
Amount of water: 690 cc

#347 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 27 May 2010 - 03:23 PM

Thank You Hiroyuki!
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#348 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 29 May 2010 - 08:54 PM

Posted Image

How do I make these shakes? Are the directions the same for both?

Thanks,

Preesi
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#349 Hiroyuki

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Posted 29 May 2010 - 09:28 PM

Yes, the directions are exactly the same:

Put one bag (25 g) in a large cup, add 150 to 200 ml of water or milk, and stir well.

#350 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 30 May 2010 - 06:08 AM

TY TY TY Hiroyuki...
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#351 STP

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Posted 25 November 2010 - 04:49 PM

As you may already be aware, I was deciding about buying a Kezuriki (see my post in the forum) and I finally settled for the e-dashi one which should be in my hands quite soon :)

I looked at the following two web pages which describe the use and maintenance of the Kazuriki:
http://www.e-dashi.c...i/kezuriki.html
http://www.e-dashi.c...kezurikata.html

From the confusing Japanese – English translation of Google Chrome (by the way, are you aware of a better alternative?) what I got regarding the usage is:

1 wipe with a dry (absolutely not wet) cloth the dry bonito to remove excess mould

2 start cutting using an angle of approximately 45 degrees

3 if cuts are too thin or too thick adjust the blade (here the translation suggests that pieces of blade may fall into the bonito flakes if cut is too thick, I really hope it's a translation issue!!! :P)

Regarding the maintenance:

1 after use remove the oil and fat from the plane and remove the flakes from the blade (I may add, possibly without cutting my finger :P)

I would really appreciate if someone with a better knowledge of Japanese could verify whether I am missing some fundamental aspects of the cutting of the bonito and of the maintenance of this precious item :)

Thank you in advance for any help!

Cheers

#352 STP

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Posted 11 September 2011 - 06:05 AM

Just in case anyone is interested I actually paid a translator for these two web-pages. I am more than happy to give the English translation to anyone who want them.

#353 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 11:46 AM

Hi can someone tell me what thiss stuff actually does and the ingredients?

 

http://i.imgur.com/hGwFAT0.jpg

 

http://i.imgur.com/46cllbB.jpg

 

TIA


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