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Trimoline


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12 replies to this topic

#1 Othafa9

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Posted 14 April 2004 - 10:41 AM

I constantly see it in publications like PA & D, but am unsure of what it actually is.
Thanks.

#2 Chocolate Guy

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Posted 14 April 2004 - 11:18 AM

Trimoline (also know as Nevuline in the Pastry 1 line) is an Invert Sugar Syrup paste. It is very concentrated and very thick, used to prevent crystallization, resists humidity, acts as an anti-oxidant, increases carmelization, improves texture, preserves aroma, flavor, and color.

It is used in baked goods, yeast doughs, butter creams, etc.

It is bake stable and freeze stable.

It can be used as a replacement of part sugars: croissants and brioche (25-30%); soft doughs (30-35%); white bread (20g per kilo of flour); dry cakes (4-5%); genoise cakes and madeleines (5-10%); butter cream (25-40%).

I have been told that it is also used in chocolate truffles, but I don't know exactly how. maybe someone else can comment on this.

It has a 12 month shelf life once opened, and should be stored in a dry and cool place (68-72 degrees).

I hope this helps. :biggrin:

Edited by Chocolate Guy, 14 April 2004 - 07:43 PM.

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Great Lakes Gourmet

#3 chefette

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Posted 14 April 2004 - 11:25 AM

It is invert sugar -

As defined in factmoster.com "a mixture of the dextrorotatory forms of glucose and fructose, formed naturally in fruits and produced artificially in syrups or fondants by treating cane sugar with acids."


or "Invert sugar is prepared by the hydrolysis of sucrose to glucose (dextrose) and fructose. This is achieved by subjecting a sucrose solution to acid and heat:"

"Invert sugar has a high affinity for water. For this reason, invert sugar is used to keep products moist, extending acceptable shelf life. Applications of this include sugar confectionery, cakes and soft cookies, and bread rolls. In low fat baked goods this increase in moisture retention is especially important, since low fat products become dry and stale much more quickly than their full fat counterparts. Glycerol is often used as the humectant in cakes, and a suitable rule of thumb is that around two to three times the level of invert syrup can be used in place of glycerol. Using invert instead of glycerol will give the additional benefits of sweetness, flavour enhancement of fruit products, and colour and flavour development during cooking."

Brittish Sugar

also
Crystallisation Control
Reduced Viscosity
Flavour Enhancement
Flavour and Colour Development
Texture Softening
Water Activity Reduction (slows spoilage)
Freezing Point Depression

It is not really available to the home cook - it is a professional product and generally comes in big buckets.

Hope this answers your questions

#4 Steve Klc

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Posted 14 April 2004 - 11:52 AM

I know a lot of pastry chefs who use trimoline in sorbet making--I use it in certain ice creams--why shouldn't it be used, Chocolate Guy? Sometimes the commercial formulations, labelling and names are different: "inverted sugar syrup" is used more often, I think but I've seen "liquid inverted sugar" as well--it's usually a whitish or yellowish sticky paste (I like the white paste) and works very well in sorbets and ice creams, lowers the freezing point, virtually eliminates crystallization, just don't use too high a percentage in your recipe or it will affect the final texture too much. It's used in chocolate and bon bon work as well to extend shelf life--and it helps bon bon's "freeze" better.
Steve Klc

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Oyamel : Zaytinya : Cafe Atlantico : Jaleo

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#5 tan319

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Posted 14 April 2004 - 01:59 PM

It's used in all kinds of ice cream recipes that regularly make PA&D, as well as many others.
2317/5000

#6 nightscotsman

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Posted 14 April 2004 - 02:10 PM

Trimoline can also act as an emulsifier and help stabilize an emulsion, which is why it is included in some ganache recipes.

#7 Chocolate Guy

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Posted 14 April 2004 - 02:40 PM

According to the technical specs that we have on Trimoline, it tells us not to use it in ice creams or sorbets.

I will check with the manufacturer and find out if it can be used, or if not, why not.

Thanks for the info.

That's why this forum is so useful, I learn something new every day.

Edited by Chocolate Guy, 14 April 2004 - 07:46 PM.

Tom Chaput
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Great Lakes Gourmet

#8 tan319

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Posted 14 April 2004 - 02:58 PM

According to the technical specs that we have on Trimoline, it tell us not to use it in ice creams or sorbets.

I will check with the manufacturer and find out if it can be used, or if not, why not.

Thanks for the info.

That's why this forum is so useful, I learn something new every day.

I don't know if 'Nevuline', or whatever it's called, is aimed for a specific use, ie; baking, etc., but trimoline is used in many ice cream/sorbet recipes from the likes of Balaguer, Adria, Bau, the aforementioneded chefs from PA&D, like Michael Laiskonis, Nicole Kaplan (I believe) , other industry pros like Steve Klc, etc..
That said, the cake recipes I've made using trimoline have kind of put me off, in that it seems to give product a weird smell.
Has anyone else ever noticed that?
2317/5000

#9 Chocolate Guy

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Posted 14 April 2004 - 05:48 PM

Nevuline from Pastry 1 is the same product as Trimoline, just a different label is what Pastry 1 has told me.
Tom Chaput
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Great Lakes Gourmet

#10 Scotty O

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Posted 15 April 2004 - 10:32 AM

Is there any way for home bakers to get their hands on a resonable quantity of this stuff?

#11 alanamoana

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Posted 15 April 2004 - 10:55 AM

why would the home cook need this stuff? if you need invert sugar, use: honey, glucose, corn syrup, etc.

the professionals are using this to make products shelf stable either baked or frozen.

there are also many professionals who don't use this stuff at all and seem to get by with a pretty superior product.

#12 stscam

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Posted 15 April 2004 - 11:40 AM

You can buy a 2-1/2 pound container of Nulomoline (another brand of invert sugar) for $6.75 from Sweet Celebrations. They also sell 2-1/2 pounds of glucose and lots of other useful baking/pastry items. The prices are a little steep, but for the person who needs just a smidge, this is a good source.
Steve Smith
Glacier Country

#13 Anatolia

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Posted 30 November 2004 - 08:19 AM

If you are still looking - and after figuring out what it is I found Lepicerie.com supplies Trimoline and many other pastry ingredients for the home chef. Now that I have moved on to using higher end ingredients this site has been a great resource.