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Homemade Marshmallow Recipes & Tips


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1057 replies to this topic

#721 McAuliflower

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Posted 03 September 2007 - 05:28 PM

How sticky and stiff should the finished marshmallow be when you pour it into the tray?

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I usually whip mine to ~ 10 - 12 minutes.
When i pour it in the pan it is very stiff and sets up very quickly. In fact, the word pour has nothing to do with it- very much a scrap and cajole process.

The longer you whip it, the more air you incorporate, the more chance you give the syrup to cool and stiffen the mix.

I think your flavors (passion fruit!!) are begging for colored swirls .
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#722 tammylc

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Posted 03 September 2007 - 06:42 PM

How sticky and stiff should the finished marshmallow be when you pour it into the tray?

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I usually whip mine to ~ 10 - 12 minutes.
When i pour it in the pan it is very stiff and sets up very quickly. In fact, the word pour has nothing to do with it- very much a scrap and cajole process.

The longer you whip it, the more air you incorporate, the more chance you give the syrup to cool and stiffen the mix.

I think your flavors (passion fruit!!) are begging for colored swirls .

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It was your 1/4 recipe that came out so stiff, whereas my full recipes made from nightscotsman's recipe came out softer. Are there any other differences between the two recipes, or is yours really just 1/4 of his? The fruit ones were definitely warmer when I put them into the pan, so it's likely I just needed to let them whip longer to cool and stiffen - they were very soft and pourable, not really sticky at all like the espresso one was.

What temperature do you cook the syrup to?

I definitely want to try the colored swirls. Next time. (I sense much marshmallow making in my future.) Lemon is high on the list.

Thanks!

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#723 tammylc

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Posted 03 September 2007 - 07:37 PM

Oh, and I thought I should note that espresso marshmallows made the best smores. As soon as I tasted the marshmallows, I said "these will be really good with chocolate" and I was right.

I know a bunch of people have talked about coffee marshmallows in this thread, but I didn't see any details. I substituted freshly brewed espresso for all the liquid in the gelatin step. My husband the coffee geek warned me that the espresso would get bitter if I let it stand to cool down, so I threw an ice cube in to cool it faster - meaning the resulting liquid was slightly watered down espresso. The bitterness of the coffee offsets the sweet marshmallow very nicely - definitely a grown-up flavor.

My husband also makes cold-filtered coffee, and I'm going to try making marshmallows from that next time he has some around.

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#724 David J.

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Posted 05 September 2007 - 08:33 PM

I've got a question on how keep this pourable long enough to get it into a 1/4" deep frame for the first of a dual layer ganache (Peter Greweling's Hot Chocolate truffles).

This is my first try after whipping for 10-12 minutes:

Posted Image

It was a struggle to get into the frame and by the time I tried to level it off with my 12" wide scraper it was already set too hard which resulted in a mess. I had an indent that I tried to fill which just made it worse.

Then I tried a second time and let this one whip for only five minutes:

Posted Image

It was a little easier to get into the frame and spread around before my level scraping, but it too was pretty well set by the time I got done which resulted in a less than steller surface.

Would it help to use a heat gun on on/in the bowl as it whips to keep it flowing a little better, or would that just mess it up?

Any other tips?

#725 patris

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Posted 06 September 2007 - 05:11 AM

Tammy - if it helps at all, I used about 2 tablespoons of instant espresso in the blooming water (I don't use Nightscotsman's recipe, I don't think, but the components seem to be the same). The espresso dissolves quickly in cold water and gives a really pronounced, but not overbearing, flavor. I also subbed out the white sugar and light corn syrup with dark brown sugar and dark corn syrup, which lends an extra bitter-sweetish thing that I love. Funny you call it a grown-up flavor - my sister said the same thing when she called me in despair that she'd devoured the samples I gave her.

David - I find that underbeating, while it takes longer for the finished product to set up to a nice cuttable consistency, not only makes spreading easier but results in a lovely, creamy texture. I don't so much go by time as by look - about 30 seconds after big sticky "threads" of marshmallow begin to appear between the sides of the bowl and the beater is when I call it quits. The couple times I kept track of timing, it ended up to be about 7 minutes. I would stick with underbeating and work like a maniac to get it spread quickly - I generally use my (gloved) hands sprayed with pan spray to pat mine out evenly. I never could find a spreader that worked for me.

It makes me so happy to see this thread popping up again with more regularity!
Patty

#726 tammylc

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Posted 06 September 2007 - 01:42 PM

David - what temperature are you cooking the sugar to? The only time i got a very stiff marshmallow was when i thought i might have overheated my sugar. The other times i got to only 136 or 138, and that gave me a very pourable marshmallow. Those were also fruit puree marshmallows, which might make a difference in consistency.

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#727 David J.

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Posted 06 September 2007 - 01:52 PM

David - what temperature are you cooking the sugar to? The only time i got a very stiff marshmallow was when i thought i might have overheated my sugar.  The other times i got to only 136 or 138, and that gave me a very pourable marshmallow.  Those were also fruit puree marshmallows, which might make a difference in consistency.

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NightScotsman gives 240F and Peter Greweling gives 252F.
The first batch went to 245F and I was going for 240 on the second batch but got distracted and pulled it off the stove at 250.

The recipie is Greweling's, but it's pretty close to a plain vanilla version of NightScotsman's. It's pretty stiff coming out of the mixing bowl. I think next time I'll try keeping it warm (but not melted) with a heat gun during the mixing and see if that helps.

#728 tammylc

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Posted 07 September 2007 - 07:49 AM

I think you'll find if you go to only 238 or so you'll have a much more workable consistency and still a good result.

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#729 Desiderio

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Posted 07 September 2007 - 05:21 PM

I cook mine at 235 ( in the recipe NightScotsman calls between 234 and 240 )
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#730 McAuliflower

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Posted 09 September 2007 - 09:19 PM

I cook mine at 235 ( in the recipe NightScotsman calls between 234 and 240 )

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Chiming in late- I do 240F also.

Also- the 1/4 recipe was based off of the Nightscotsman recipe.
"A gourmet who thinks of calories is like a tart who looks at her watch." --JB
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#731 patris

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Posted 16 September 2007 - 10:31 AM

Taking advantage of a brief chilly spell, I decided to work on pumpkin spice 'mallows (inspired by many of you). I bloomed the gelatin in pumpkin puree, a bit of water and loads of spices - cinnamon, ginger, cloves and nutmeg, and cooked the brown sugar/corn syrup/water mixture with even more spices - all told, a tablespoon each of cinnamon and ginger, a few heavy pinches of cloves, and a liberal grating of nutmeg. Then I dipped them. They're incredible - the taste reminds me of a really good pumpkin-chocolate chip muffin.

I took pictures:

Posted Image
Patty

#732 prairiegirl

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Posted 16 September 2007 - 10:15 PM

Fantastic. Great job!!

#733 KrazedMom

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Posted 16 September 2007 - 10:36 PM

Taking advantage of a brief chilly spell, I decided to work on pumpkin spice 'mallows (inspired by many of you).  I bloomed the gelatin in pumpkin puree, a bit of water and loads of spices - cinnamon, ginger, cloves and nutmeg, and cooked the brown sugar/corn syrup/water mixture with even more spices - all told, a tablespoon each of cinnamon and ginger, a few heavy pinches of cloves, and a liberal grating of nutmeg.  Then I dipped them.  They're incredible - the taste reminds me of a really good pumpkin-chocolate chip muffin.



How much puree did you use? Was it equal substitution for the the water?

Could you list the recipe please? These things look and sound delicious! :wub: Very nice job!

#734 patris

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Posted 17 September 2007 - 05:21 AM

Thank you!

I use a different recipe from Nightscotsman's legendary one that most folks here use, but I subbed out most of the water for pumpkin puree - just a bit of water to bloom the gelatine.

I posted the recipe on recipe gullet: Recipe Gullet - Patris's Pumpkin Spice Marshmallows

I've never written a recipe from scratch before, so please let me know if anything needs clarifying.

Enjoy!
Patty

#735 Joni

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Posted 17 September 2007 - 02:32 PM

thanks for taking the time to post your recipe...will make them for halloween!

#736 apronstrings

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 07:35 AM

I want to top a batch of marshmallows with caramelized cocoa nibs. My question(s)- At what point should I put the nibs on top of the marshmallows? If I plop the slab on top of a layer of nibs, won't there be cornstarch/sugar all over them? If I wait until they are cut, what's to keep the nibs from falling off the marshmallows?? Thanks for your advice!

Edited by apronstrings, 02 October 2007 - 07:39 AM.


#737 Mariam

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 12:10 PM

Taking advantage of a brief chilly spell, I decided to work on pumpkin spice 'mallows (inspired by many of you).  I bloomed the gelatin in pumpkin puree, a bit of water and loads of spices - cinnamon, ginger, cloves and nutmeg, and cooked the brown sugar/corn syrup/water mixture with even more spices - all told, a tablespoon each of cinnamon and ginger, a few heavy pinches of cloves, and a liberal grating of nutmeg.  Then I dipped them.  They're incredible - the taste reminds me of a really good pumpkin-chocolate chip muffin.

I took pictures:

Posted Image

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Those look totally amazing!
In the past when i've tried to coat mine in chocolate the m/m started to melt, what would be the best way to do it?

Also my batch set really well but even after coating with potato starch they were quite sticky - should i have beat them a bit more or is it more to do with cooking the sugar to a higher temp (i followed nightwatchmans recipe)

xx
so much to do so little time!

#738 patris

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 01:54 PM

Thank you!

I've never had a big problem with the marshmallows melting - perhaps your chocolate is too warm, or you're letting them sit in the chocolate too long? Or are you putting several marshmallows into the chocolate at once and taking them out one at a time? I just drop one in the chocolate, flip it upside down with my dipping fork to get it coated, then knock the excess chocolate off and slide it off the fork onto my wax-papered cookie sheet.

As far as coating them goes, for myself I find a mixture of half cornstarch and half powdered sugar works really well. I cut them into cubes, toss them in that to coat them thoroughly, then knock off the excess in a strainer. Mine haven't really gotten sticky. I think if you're cooking to 240ish, the sugar temp shouldn't be an issue, and Nightscotsman's recipe gets rave reviews from just about everyone who tries it. Sorry I couldn't be of more help!
Patty

#739 alanamoana

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 04:18 PM

I want to top a batch of marshmallows with caramelized cocoa nibs. My question(s)- At what point should I put the nibs on top of the marshmallows? If I plop the slab on top of a layer of nibs, won't there be cornstarch/sugar all over them? If I wait until they are cut, what's to keep the nibs from falling  off the marshmallows?? Thanks for your advice!

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i would either fold some in at the end of the whipping/cooling process...or if you're dipping in chocolate, i would sprinkle some on top of the chocolate before it sets. every other scenario seems a bit dubious.

#740 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 05:14 PM

What about REAL, original marshmallows? You know the kind you make from the marshmallow plant?
Wawa Sizzli FTW!

#741 apronstrings

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Posted 02 October 2007 - 07:00 PM

Thanks Alanamoana! I was thinkng along the lines of the Plush Puffs crunchy toppings.

#742 Mariam

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Posted 08 October 2007 - 02:08 PM

Thanks Patris

I think my chocolate was too hot because as soon as I dunked one it and tried fishing it out it had started to melt so we had a fondue party instead!

I'll give it another go because those just look awesome.

xx

Btw this Q is for anyone I know the original recipe calls for Corn Syrup well we dont get it in England so I substituted it for Glucose Syrup - could this be the reason why they get kinda sticky?
so much to do so little time!

#743 alanamoana

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Posted 08 October 2007 - 03:37 PM

Thanks Patris

I think my chocolate was too hot because as soon as I dunked one it and tried fishing it out it had started to melt so we had a fondue party instead!

I'll give it another go because those just look awesome.

xx

Btw this Q is for anyone I know the original recipe calls for Corn Syrup well we dont get it in England so I substituted it for Glucose Syrup - could this be the reason why they get kinda sticky?

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glucose and corn syrup are pretty much interchangeable in this type of recipe...as a matter of fact, glucose has less water than corn syrup.

i don't think this is the reason for your stickiness. could be humidity or could be not cooking to the proper temperature.

if you're dipping in chocolate, your chocolate shouldn't ever be hot enough to melt a marshmallow...are you attempting to coat the 'mallows and allow them to set up like a candy? if that's the case, check out the p&b index for information on tempering chocolate. well worth the extra effort.

#744 pagosselin

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 06:12 PM

What is the shelf life of the homemade marshmallows? I want to make some for a holiday show but not sure how far ahead I can make them. I will be dipping them in chocolate and sealing them in cello bags. Should they be stored at room temp. or refrigerate for a longer shelf life? Any suggestions? :hmmm:
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#745 etalanian

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 06:32 PM

Coating the marshmallows will greatly extend their shelf life. I've kept chocolate-covered marshmallows for a few weeks with no detriment to the quality.

Be sure you keep them away from the sun, heat, and humidity.

Eileen
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#746 alanamoana

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 11:59 PM

i've kept the marshmallow recipe (posted on the marshmallow thread) for at least a month with no problems. obviously, they're better the first couple of weeks after making them, but they last a long time. as etalanian noted, enrobed, they'll last even longer.

DO NOT however, put them in the fridge. especially with chocolate coating...too much humidity. remember that sugar is hygroscopic (absorbs moisture). so you can not only get sticky marshmallows, but if they're already dipped, you can get sugar bloom on the chocolate.

frozen would be another story though. there's discussion about vacuum sealing chocolates and freezing them to no ill effect. that could be an option for you. you have to allow two days for the thawing process...one day in the fridge and one day on the counter with the wrap still on it to avoid condensation on the surface of your candies...then you can open and serve.

#747 patris

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Posted 11 October 2007 - 04:54 AM

Totally agree on the chocolate coating keeping them fresher longer. I have managed to keep enrobed marshmallows for as long as 8-10 weeks with little deterioration in texture or flavor. I had been having issues with re-crystallization after a week or 2, but I started adding about 3/4 teaspoon of cream of tartar to the sugar (or for fruit flavors, a scant 1/2 teaspoon of citric acid). That has extended the shelf life considerably for me.
Patty

#748 sugarseattle

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Posted 11 October 2007 - 08:52 AM

the recipe without egg whites lasts substantially longer than the recipe with egg whites.
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#749 Kayakado

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Posted 11 October 2007 - 08:58 AM

I included some in last years Christmas packages. One recipient was too lazy to go pick up her box and it came back. I didn't open it right away and when I did the marshmallows had spoiled. I'd say a shelf life of a few weeks given good conditions.

#750 Mariam

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Posted 11 October 2007 - 09:52 AM

Thanks Patris

I think my chocolate was too hot because as soon as I dunked one it and tried fishing it out it had started to melt so we had a fondue party instead!

I'll give it another go because those just look awesome.

xx

Btw this Q is for anyone I know the original recipe calls for Corn Syrup well we dont get it in England so I substituted it for Glucose Syrup - could this be the reason why they get kinda sticky?

View Post


glucose and corn syrup are pretty much interchangeable in this type of recipe...as a matter of fact, glucose has less water than corn syrup.

i don't think this is the reason for your stickiness. could be humidity or could be not cooking to the proper temperature.

if you're dipping in chocolate, your chocolate shouldn't ever be hot enough to melt a marshmallow...are you attempting to coat the 'mallows and allow them to set up like a candy? if that's the case, check out the p&b index for information on tempering chocolate. well worth the extra effort.

View Post


:biggrin:
Woo Hoo Success!!!!

I'm just about the happiest person who ever made Marshmallows
I managed to coat them in chocolate not all over, just the tops but they came out lovely
I also coated the remainder in potato starch - no stickiness

Thanks to everyone that gave advice - truly sound!
Now if only I could post pics of them ... :unsure:
so much to do so little time!