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Homemade Marshmallow Recipes & Tips (Part 1)

Confections

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613 replies to this topic

#91 Lloydchoc

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Posted 17 August 2004 - 11:45 AM

We have been developing a vegan marshmallow to sell at Farmer's Markets with a mixed success. Sometimes they come out great, and sometimes they don't. We found that Emes Kosher gelatin almost behaves like regular gelatin, but you have to use about 20% more to get the same texture. We found a place called Barry Farms on the internet that sells it in 8 oz packages.

The problem is the texture and the stickyness. Any plain marshmallow that we just add a flavor to such as vanilla, lemon or cinnamon, we don't have a problem (most of the time). When we use a fruit puree then the texture changes--it gets a little denser. The big problem is with the chocolate. If we use a low-fat cocoa powder (i.e. cheap), then the texture is a little denser, but the flavor is not great. If we use a high-fat cocoa powder, then it is dense and gummy (but it tastes great). I tried adding the cocoa powder to boiling water cooling and then adding the gelatin and also adding the cocoa powder at the end--it seems to be less dense when it is added at the end, but you can feel the grit of the cocoa powder.

Also, after they have been in a bag for a while, they tend to stick together. I use a mixture of cornstarch and powdered sugar for dusting. I notice that the recipe on this site calls for potato starch instead of cornstarch. Will that make a difference?

Thanks for any suggestions that anyone may have.

#92 LoveToEatATL

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Posted 17 August 2004 - 01:17 PM

I adore homemade marshmallows and can't wait to try Neil's version this weekend.

I hope I don't sound silly, but what is potato starch and where would I get it?

Thanks!
Patti Davis
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#93 nightscotsman

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Posted 17 August 2004 - 06:11 PM

Using potato starch instead of corn starch probably won't make any difference in preventing stickiness. I like using potato because I think it has a lighter, softer mouthfeel. What actually might make more difference is if you use a product called "snow sugar" (there's a French name that I won't embarass myself trying to spell). Unlike powdered sugar it's not made from sucrose, and it doesn't melt or become sticky like regular sugar will. However, when consumed in large qantities it can cause... shall we say "a few more trips to the bathroom". The light dusting on a few marshmallows shouldn't cause any problems. It's what bakeries usually use on powdered sugar donuts so they stay dry and powdery. It's available from King Arthur (Sorry if the link doesn't work - making lasting links to products in their catalog has been a problem in the past).

Potato starch can often be found in the kosher section of supermarkets or in natural/healthfood stores.

#94 JustKay

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Posted 17 August 2004 - 07:55 PM

Using potato starch instead of corn starch probably won't make any difference in preventing stickiness.

But I do think there is a diference. Previously, I used cornstarch and sugar mixture and after a while out in the open it can get a tad sticky. Try putting cornstarch out in the open for a few days and it turns kinda damp a little. Or maybe I can notice the diference because of our high humidity here.

With my last batch however, I just use 100% potato starch for dusting. The marshmallows are sweet enough. I prefer this to mixing with icing sugar. Also without the sugar, less moisture attracted.

I read on the Net that kept in an airtight container, the marshmallows should last a month. Anyone knows for sure?

Edited by kew, 17 August 2004 - 07:57 PM.


#95 nightscotsman

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Posted 18 August 2004 - 05:28 AM

Since the marshmallows are almost pure sugar, they should keep indefinitely. They will dry out and become chewier over time, so the more airtight the container the better.

#96 LoveToEatATL

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Posted 18 August 2004 - 06:24 AM

Potato starch can often be found in the kosher section of supermarkets or in natural/healthfood stores.

Thanks, Neil - I think it is uber cool that you are at the Bellagio and still have time to impart your knowledge. I have eaten at Picasso and it blew me away.
Patti Davis
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#97 JustKay

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Posted 22 August 2004 - 10:40 PM

I made the cocoa marshmallow yesterday and used only 1/4C cocoa. The marshmallows are a tad too soft. But the taste is just right though.

I am tired of having to deal with measuring the liquid glucose - not an easy task. According to my scale, 1 1/4C liquid glucose is 375gm. Anyone can help verify? Thanks.

#98 LoveToEatATL

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Posted 23 August 2004 - 07:22 AM

I made the vanilla marshmallows this weekend and my gelatin didn't whisk off the bottom of my kitchenaide correctly. They were heavy and thin - I used a sheet pan.

I also tried to eyeball the "doneness" of the corn syrup and sugar mixture. When it comes to a boil, do I turn it down to low and let it continue to cook? For how long? I had a boilover - wow, what a mess.

Help!
Patti Davis
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#99 nightscotsman

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Posted 23 August 2004 - 03:58 PM

I also tried to eyeball the "doneness" of the corn syrup and sugar mixture. When it comes to a boil, do I turn it down to low and let it continue to cook? For how long? I had a boilover - wow, what a mess.

Unless you do a lot of sugar syrups on a regular basis, I can guarantee that "eyeballing for doneness" will not work. The only reliable ways of telling if the sugar is cooked to the correct stage are to use a thermometer or drop some in cold water to check for soft ball consistency. Candy thermometers can be had quite cheaply, but the cold water test is very easy and actually more acurate. If you find that you've overshot the soft ball stage, you can actually add a little more water and boil until you reach the correct temperature.

Sorry your batch didn't turn out well - I hope you'll try again.

#100 LoveToEatATL

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Posted 24 August 2004 - 06:25 AM

I also tried to eyeball the "doneness" of the corn syrup and sugar mixture.  When it comes to a boil, do I turn it down to low and let it continue to cook? For how long? I had a boilover - wow, what a mess.

Unless you do a lot of sugar syrups on a regular basis, I can guarantee that "eyeballing for doneness" will not work. The only reliable ways of telling if the sugar is cooked to the correct stage are to use a thermometer or drop some in cold water to check for soft ball consistency. Candy thermometers can be had quite cheaply, but the cold water test is very easy and actually more acurate. If you find that you've overshot the soft ball stage, you can actually add a little more water and boil until you reach the correct temperature.

Sorry your batch didn't turn out well - I hope you'll try again.

Thanks, Neil! So to test for the soft ball stage, I need ice water and the sugar mixture should ball up when I put a drop in?

I totally plan on trying again. I was going to buy another candy thermometer, but the only ones I can find are the ones that are cylinder shaped and don't get a decent reading.

I refuse to give up until I have soft, fluffy marshmallows! :biggrin:
Patti Davis
www.anatomyofadinnerparty.com

#101 nightscotsman

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Posted 24 August 2004 - 08:17 AM

Thanks, Neil! So to test for the soft ball stage, I need ice water and the sugar mixture should ball up when I put a drop in?

Right - the sugar should form a ball that doesn't stick to your fingers, but is still soft and pliable. Good luck!

#102 LoveToEatATL

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Posted 24 August 2004 - 08:33 AM

Thanks, Neil!  So to test for the soft ball stage, I need ice water and the sugar mixture should ball up when I put a drop in?

Right - the sugar should form a ball that doesn't stick to your fingers, but is still soft and pliable. Good luck!

Thanks, Neil. Your advice is invaluable. I will try again tonight!

About the boiling over - should I just bring it to a boil and then turn it down? I really had a huge mess. Sticky City! :laugh:

Edited by LoveToEatATL, 24 August 2004 - 08:34 AM.

Patti Davis
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#103 JustKay

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Posted 24 August 2004 - 09:14 AM

About the boiling over - should I just bring it to a boil and then turn it down?

I think you need to use a bigger pot because at one point it does foam a bit hence the boil over but after it reaches a certain temperature, it will settle down to a clear liquid once again. I use a pot big enough so that the liquid fills to 1/3.

#104 JustKay

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Posted 24 August 2004 - 09:21 AM

I have some questions on marshmallow creme. Is it the same as marshmallow fluff ie stuff in the jar that's used in so many fudge recipes?

If I omit the gelatine from the marshmallow recipe, does it make the fluff? Or does marshmallow fluff contain egg whites?

Does anyone have a good recipe for marshmallow fluff? And how long does this keep?

What do you think of this recipe?

Marshmallow Creme

2C sugar
1C egg whites
1C water
1/2C light corn syrup
2C light corn syrup
4t pure vanilla extract

Cook sugar, water and two cups corn syrup to 240 degrees. In mixing bowl, beat egg whites and half cup corn syrup until mixed. Beat on med/low until light and fluffy. Slowly add hot syrup while beating. When all is mixed beat hard for three minutes. Add vanilla extract.


Thanks for any help!

Edited by kew, 24 August 2004 - 09:22 AM.


#105 LoveToEatATL

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Posted 24 August 2004 - 11:22 AM



About the boiling over - should I just bring it to a boil and then turn it down?

I think you need to use a bigger pot because at one point it does foam a bit hence the boil over but after it reaches a certain temperature, it will settle down to a clear liquid once again. I use a pot big enough so that the liquid fills to 1/3.

Kew, Thank you soooo much!
Patti Davis
www.anatomyofadinnerparty.com

#106 JustKay

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Posted 25 August 2004 - 03:17 AM

Kew, Thank you soooo much!

You're welcome.

I just made 2 batches of the vanilla marshmallow this morning and I noted down some observations. It's probably not as accurate as any thermometer or cold-water test but hopefully will aid you somewhat in addition to doing the cold-water test.

I use medium-low flame all through and 3L clear Corning pan. The first number is recorded for first batch and the ones in the bracket for second batch.

At 12 (13) minutes, the sugar looks almost dissolved and the temperature was at 200F. The liquid is opaque.

At 13 (15) minutes, the syrup begins to boil and temperature now is 100C/212F.


At 14 (16) minutes, the syrups comes to boil and temp now is 108C/225F. It begins to foam.

At 15 (17)minutes, it really foams as the syrup is now at a rolling boil. 230F.

Just keep stirring gently and at 17 (19) mins there will no more foaming and the liquid is now very clear, no longer opaque. The temp is now 234F.

At 20 (22) mins, the syrup reaaches the temp of 240F and is ready to be poured into the gelatine mixture.

I use the 1/2C measuring spoon with spout to help pour the syrup in a thin stream into the bowl. After the first 1/2C I use the spatula to ensure all the gelatine coagulated at the bottom of the bowl is incorprated into the liquid. Continue pouring hot syrup in thin stream while beating on high speed. It takes me about 5mins to finish pouring all the syrup.

I then let the mixer run undisturbed for another 10mins on high. The syrup will then be very fluffy, very white and more than doubled the volume. It's ready to be poured into your prepared pan.

I would say that the syrup after the foaming and turning clear needs to be boiled for at least 3 mins before it's ready. Which is total about 5 mins after it comes to a boil.

I hope this helps any 'newbies' to making marshmallows, in addition to the cold-water test (as sometimes I am rather confused about the soft-ball test myself - homebaker here :wink: )

#107 momlovestocook

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Posted 25 August 2004 - 05:43 AM

Okay, total idiot question here. I have been looking for potato starch and have only found potato flour. Is it the same thing? I know it's probably not but I thought I would ask(since I already bought the flour).
Sandra

#108 LoveToEatATL

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Posted 25 August 2004 - 08:54 AM


Kew, Thank you soooo much!

You're welcome.

I just made 2 batches of the vanilla marshmallow this morning and I noted down some observations. It's probably not as accurate as any thermometer or cold-water test but hopefully will aid you somewhat in addition to doing the cold-water test.

I use medium-low flame all through and 3L clear Corning pan. The first number is recorded for first batch and the ones in the bracket for second batch.

At 12 (13) minutes, the sugar looks almost dissolved and the temperature was at 200F. The liquid is opaque.

At 13 (15) minutes, the syrup begins to boil and temperature now is 100C/212F.


At 14 (16) minutes, the syrups comes to boil and temp now is 108C/225F. It begins to foam.

At 15 (17)minutes, it really foams as the syrup is now at a rolling boil. 230F.

Just keep stirring gently and at 17 (19) mins there will no more foaming and the liquid is now very clear, no longer opaque. The temp is now 234F.

At 20 (22) mins, the syrup reaaches the temp of 240F and is ready to be poured into the gelatine mixture.

I use the 1/2C measuring spoon with spout to help pour the syrup in a thin stream into the bowl. After the first 1/2C I use the spatula to ensure all the gelatine coagulated at the bottom of the bowl is incorprated into the liquid. Continue pouring hot syrup in thin stream while beating on high speed. It takes me about 5mins to finish pouring all the syrup.

I then let the mixer run undisturbed for another 10mins on high. The syrup will then be very fluffy, very white and more than doubled the volume. It's ready to be poured into your prepared pan.

I would say that the syrup after the foaming and turning clear needs to be boiled for at least 3 mins before it's ready. Which is total about 5 mins after it comes to a boil.

I hope this helps any 'newbies' to making marshmallows, in addition to the cold-water test (as sometimes I am rather confused about the soft-ball test myself - homebaker here :wink: )

Kew, now I am really excited about making the marshmallows. I can't thank you enough!
Patti Davis
www.anatomyofadinnerparty.com

#109 Tepee

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Posted 25 August 2004 - 07:48 PM

Woooohoooo! I did it! I did it! Thank you so much, Nightscotsman, and, all of you who posted your experience with his recipe. It's the best marshmallow I've ever tasted and I didn't even use puree. I can just imagine how heavenly those with puree in it will taste. I made 2 layers; one, rose-flavored, and, the other, pandan-flavored. I'll never buy commercial marshmallows again, that's for sure!

Posted Image
TPcal!
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#110 Tepee

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Posted 25 August 2004 - 09:23 PM

Just want to mention that I used glucose syrup instead of corn syrup, and I dusted entirely with potato starch to cut off some sweetness.
TPcal!
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Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

#111 Joni

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Posted 26 August 2004 - 07:48 AM

Those are gorgeous...so did you just make each color one at a time and then pour on top of each other?

BTW..has anyone made Kahlua ones or used a sweet liquor - Baileys, etc. in making marshmallows?

#112 Tepee

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Posted 26 August 2004 - 06:56 PM

I made the first batch pink, poured in the jelly roll tin, then made the second batch right away and poured on top of the still soft first batch.

Your liqueur variations sound decadent! Do let us know after you've tried it.
TPcal!
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Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

#113 JanKK

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Posted 26 August 2004 - 07:14 PM

Ok ....it's 9:15pm and y'all have me wanting to run out to the kitchen and make more marshmallows.


Oh well .....sleep is over-rated anyway, right? ;)

#114 JustKay

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Posted 27 August 2004 - 09:52 AM

I made these multi-colored marshmallows last week.

When the mixture was ready to be poured out, I just divided it into separate bowls and colored them and then poured each color on top of another.

Posted Image

I also made cocoa marshmallow. I should've dusted it with cocoa powder but I was afraid it might be bitter .... but then dusted with potato starch, they didn't look too bad ... :biggrin:

Posted Image

Now I can't look at some fruit (or even vege!) and think about making a puree out of it to try in the marshmallow recipe. LOL! :rolleyes:

Edited by kew, 27 August 2004 - 09:53 AM.


#115 Redsugar

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Posted 27 August 2004 - 01:51 PM

At least for the sake of historical curiosity, here is a recipe for marshmallows included in a 1920 cookbook which had belonged to one of my great Aunts:

3 cups granulated sugar
1 cup cold water
1 package gelatine
1 cup cold water
2 tablespoons vanilla essence

Soak gelatine 20 minutes in 1 cup cold water. Boil sugar & water together 10 minutes. Add gelatine to syrup and cook until it is dissolved.

A coating for the marshmallow:

2 cups brown sugar, 2 tablespoons water, 2 tablespoons vinegar, 1/4 cup butter. Boil until brittle in cold water; then dip marshmallows in it.

A recipe for Marshmallow Fudge is appended in the book.

Incidentally, TP(M'sia)'s substitution (posted above) of glucose syrup for corn syrup theoretically reminded me of...

Turkish Delight

250g liquid glucose
1.25 kg granulated sugar
2250g cornflour
2 Tbsps rosewater
1/2 tsp pink food colouring, optional
120g powdered sugar

#116 amccomb

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Posted 27 August 2004 - 03:37 PM

I'm interested in hearing ideas for other flavors. So, I saw recommendations to avoid things with fat (such as melted chocolate, however I saw that someone made coconut with coconut milk - sounds wonderful!). I was thinking peanut butter would be a decadent treat, but if the fat keeps it from whipping up, that would be a no-no. Could you whip in the peanut butter after the rest of the mixture is already whipped and fluffy?

I edited this post to add that maybe using grade B maple syrup would be a nice flavor - but would the extra sugar cause a problem?

Edited by amccomb, 27 August 2004 - 03:38 PM.


#117 LoveToEatATL

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Posted 27 August 2004 - 05:02 PM

KEW - NEIL!!!!!

I believe I did it!!

Kew, your step by step directions were a godsend - thank you so much!! They look like they should and are now cooling. WOW! My hubby and I were licking the bowl - what a silly mess!!

Cannot wait until morning and then to share them with friends - they are gonna freak!!

Whisking the gelatin at the bottom of my kitchen aid was key!

I am sooooo excited!

Patti
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#118 Tepee

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Posted 27 August 2004 - 06:07 PM

Turkish Delight

250g liquid glucose
1.25 kg granulated sugar
2250g cornflour
2 Tbsps rosewater
1/2 tsp pink food colouring, optional
120g powdered sugar

Oh, Oh, Redsugar! After the divine marshmallows, DH and I were dreaming about Turkish Delights. You must be telepathic! Thank you! :laugh:
TPcal!
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#119 AlainV

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Posted 29 August 2004 - 06:15 AM

Here is my variation of Nightscotsman's fabulous marshmallows : plain marshmallows coated with chocolate :smile:

Posted Image

When you eat them, you have first the crackling thin chocolate layer followed by the smoothness of the marshmallow. I just love it !

#120 viva

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Posted 29 August 2004 - 08:15 AM

AlainV, those look spectacular!

I was thinking of something similar for Thanksgiving (yeah, I start thinking about Thanksgiving 3 months in advance)...Has anyone tried making pumpkin or cranberry flavored marshmallows? I was thinking of a pumpkin or cranberry marshmallow, dipped in chocolate, sandwiched between thin, crispy gingerbread cookies as my cookie this year.
...wine can of their wits the wise beguile, make the sage frolic, and the serious smile. --Alexander Pope





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