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Homemade Marshmallow Recipes & Tips (Part 1)

Confections

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#31 nightscotsman

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Posted 14 May 2004 - 01:43 PM

Neil...I made passionfruit and they were incredible...how did you make the coconut ones...did you just replace the water with coconut milk? I did try a small batch of cocoa ones too -- delicious!

Yep, I just used coconut milk - but I made my own rather than use canned for better flavor. Pour boiling water over shredded, unsweetened coconut and let sit for about half an hour. Spin in a blender or use a stick blender. Strain through a triple layer of cheese cloth, squeezing out as much liquid as possible. You can also toast the coconut before adding water for a toasty flavor.

#32 andiesenji

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Posted 14 May 2004 - 02:34 PM

Also, for those of us trying this out at home (I may make these plain and then dip them in some fab chocolate for an event I am doing), any replacement ideas for a guitar? Can I refrigerate these, cut them, and let them warm up?

TiA,
Clay

I use a fine monofilament line - bought in the fishing section at Wal-Mart.

Cut a piece long enough with some extra to tie around a couple of bottle corks at each end.

Grasp the corks, stretch the line tight (I have water running in the sink and wet the line under the running water.
I put the taut line on the top then pull to one side while pushing down. This gives a clean cut.

You can also use a steel guitar string, very fine. You still need something to hold onto at each end.

I use this method for cutting lakhoum, taffy, cheeses, etc.
The mono line is very cheap, you can get a lifetime supply for a couple of bucks.
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#33 JustKay

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Posted 17 May 2004 - 08:36 AM

I tried nightscotsman's marshmallow recipe - vanilla version, and attempted it with Kojel. Kojel is in powdered form and not granules. And 3 packets, though weighs a total of .9oz, measures more than 4t.

First, I thought through the recipe trying to figure out how to adapt it to using Kojel which must be dissolved in boiling water and used immediately.

According to the marshmallow recipe, the gelatine mixture is cold (at room temperature) when the sugar mixture is added to it. I don't know if this is an important process but I was determined to stick as close to the instructions as possible.

Hence, this is what I did.

I boiled the 3C sugar, 3/4C water, 1 1/4C light corn syrup (I use Karo brand) and 1/4 tsalt until it reaches soft ball stage. I used the candy thermometer as well as did the cold water test. The thermometer registered 165 when the soft ball stage was achieved. (When it read 140, the syrup was still very watery and didn't pass the soft ball test in cold water.)

I then quickly added the Kojel to boiling hot water (1/4C - which is the puree portion substituted).

I had 1/2C cold water (added 1t vanila earlier) sitting in the bowl to which I poured the syrup in while whisking at highest setting. At the same time, I had my son help pour in the hot Kojel.

So, there I thought I have the hot syrup hitting cold water and also solve the problem of dissolving Kojel in hot water.

I proceeded to beat on high for about 20mins but nothing! The mixture turned slightly whitish/opaque but not at all what marshmallow looks like. It also tasted rather sourish. I think this is the off-taste of Kojel. Oh maaaan .... and I though there goes the expensive corn syrup down the drain. I continued beating maybe 5 mins more before giving up. It was just a thick runny mixture still.

And then I thought, why not try adding egg whites since the mixture is going to waste anyways.

I then quickly whipped up 3 egg whites in another bowl (the syrup mixture is still continued being whipped at high speed with the stand mixer while I do the eggs on another set of mixer) and then nuked the syrup mixture 1 min on high to rewarm it some and then poured this into the egg whites that has been whipped to soft peak stage.

The mixture then turned white. After beating the heck out of it for about 20 mins, I then poured the now somewhat stiffer 'whatever' into the prepared pan. I think it does look like marshmallow cream (if I remember correctly - I had one jar sent to me last year). After adding the egg whites, the sourish taste seemed toned down some too. The mixture now taste almost marshmallow-y. It doesn't seem very fluffy although the volume has increased.

I wonder what went wrong? Or is it just that Kojel isn't suitable? Or did I adapt the recipe incorrectly?

The measuring cup I used is American standard, so it's not the proportion (our cup here is Uk standard). It cannot be the recipe since it's a T&T. I won't be able to cut/taste it until tomorrow evening.

Any comments?

#34 Shannon_Elise

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Posted 18 May 2004 - 08:38 AM

Right now in my KitchenAid I have Kashmiri Saffron Marshmallows whipping up. I am thinking of covering them in dark chocolate after I cut them. Thanks for the recipe Neil.

I made marshmallows a while back from the book "Retro Desserts" by Wayne Harley Brachman, and I totally agree that the looks on peoples faces when you tell them the marshmallows are homemade is priceless.

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#35 JustKay

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Posted 18 May 2004 - 09:25 PM

I have been thinking and thinking about my Kosher marshmallows and I think Kojel simply won't work because (1) it is a fast acting gelling agent and (2) once set it you can't do anything to it anymore - it can't be set, melted and re-set like agar or gelatine.

Hence, I think what happened was during the beating time, the Kojel have passed it's setting stage and therefore will not set again. And the result - marshmallows that won't set. It also has a funny slightly sourish taste that even the sugars won't mask.

I will try with agar next.

I realize this isn't useful information to most people as you can all use real gelatine, but I hope this info might be helpful to those who need to make Kosher marshmallows like I do, because I've searched the Net for a recipe that gives correct instructions to use Kojel in making marshmallows but all recipes out there seem like the word gelatine is simply replaced with Kojel or Kosher gelatine.

#36 Behemoth

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Posted 24 May 2004 - 09:36 PM

I then quickly added the Kojel to boiling hot water (1/4C - which is the puree portion substituted).

Kew -- here is yet another version, it seems that person found success. She let the Kojel sit in room temp water for an hour to dissolve. I would try this recipe myself & report except a) I no longer own an electric mixer and b) don't need that much candy in my life. But maybe worth a shot, if you feel like experimenting. (Yeah, I like to let others do the work and reap the benefits :wink:) Actually, where I've read people have been unhappy with agar it seems like it is because it sets up too hard-- may just be that they put too much agar in there. Also maybe worth a shot...though I would use agar from a reputable health food store -- I've had problems with the packages of agar threads from asian marlkets, they had kind of a musty cardboard taste despite rinsing but that could have just been a quality issue. Well, maybe now that my semester is over I can try to give both versions a shot -- if I can find a mixer to borrow. Would a hand mixer have enough power?

#37 nightscotsman

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Posted 25 May 2004 - 06:46 AM

Would a hand mixer have enough power?

You certainly can make marshmallows with a hand mixer. The issue isn't power, but whether you have the stamina to hold the mixer while you beat for up to 10 minutes. Your arm may feel like it's going to fall off.

#38 Tepee

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Posted 25 May 2004 - 06:54 AM

Kew, do you think Konyaku jelly will do the trick? It seems to be such a strong gelling agent and it's vegetable-based.
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#39 JustKay

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Posted 25 May 2004 - 07:32 AM

Behemoth - thanks for the link! I will have to try to get my hands on this brand of Kosher gelatine. I don't think Kojel is workable in marshmallow recipes.

I have bought 3 envelopes agar-agar powder and thought I'd reduce the portion as it is indeed a strong gelling agent. Using the strips would even be trickier to estimate the quantity. But I'd go with full power first ie using 3 envelopes of 0.3oz agar-agar powder.

TP - Konyaku powder might work - good idea since the Konyaku jelly is softer i.e. more like gelatine. But I thought I'd try agar-agar powder first (not exactly cheap, this, eh?) Besides, when I was at Tesco the other day they don't have unflavored Konyaku powder. I am also going to Carrefour to see if they have Davis gelatine (from Australia) - this is certified Halal by the Australian Islamic Board. Carrefour used to sell this once. Wilton sells re-packed gelatine and told me they are Halal but when I requested the actual list of ingredients as on the original package, it listed beef gelatine .... the lady said ... "well, halal whaaaat? no pork meh? only beef". Nona products mostly carry the Halal logo but it is conspicuously missing from it's gelatine packaging - so I dare not buy.

Anyways ... I hope to try out with the agar-agar powder tomorrow. :smile:

Edited by kew, 25 May 2004 - 07:38 AM.


#40 JanKK

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Posted 27 May 2004 - 08:30 PM

OK......I'm thinking along the lines of Chocolate Marshmallows. Have you ever done that, Neil? Would it be reasonable to substitute 1/2 cup of melted chocolate for the Strawberry puree? Or am I crazed and not thinking properly??

#41 nightscotsman

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Posted 28 May 2004 - 03:01 AM

OK......I'm thinking along the lines of Chocolate Marshmallows. Have you ever done that, Neil? Would it be reasonable to substitute 1/2 cup of melted chocolate for the Strawberry puree? Or am I crazed and not thinking properly??

Melted chocolate won't work since the fat will keep the mixture from whipping. However, I've made them successfully with cocoa. I used 1/2 cup of cocoa, 3/4 cup water and a teaspoon of vanilla in place of the puree and water in the recipe. The mashmallows tasted almost fudgy.

#42 JustKay

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Posted 02 June 2004 - 09:53 PM

Bicycle Lee - I made Neil's marshmallow yesterday, using 30gm of pure agar-agar powder.

I must have the marsmallow jinx or something coz it didn't turn out right!

I don't know what went wrong. I heated the sugar mixture up to 240F. And then whisked it but it never turn fluffy. I beat for a total of 25 mins before giving up. It remained syrupy.

After 18hrs, it still does not set. Does not even look like marsmallow creme this time. :sad:

I am going to find HALAL gelatine and try to make it, and then if it turns out ok, I will try again using agar-agar powder as well as the Konyaku jelly powder.

Sorry that wasn't of much help.

#43 Bicycle Lee

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Posted 03 June 2004 - 09:14 AM

Are you kidding me? That IS of great help...This agar is tricky stuff and you were putting your walnuts on the line trying it out. Like I said in my PM, I am having trouble with agar across the board...NO ONE seems to know how much to use because every recipe I've tried needed more. I dunno...
I'll try the gelatin sheets....boo...
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#44 stscam

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Posted 06 June 2004 - 07:09 AM

I've made them successfully with cocoa. I used 1/2 cup of cocoa, 3/4 cup water and a teaspoon of vanilla in place of the puree and water in the recipe.

Neil,

I've tried this twice and all I end up with is goop. Too much liquid? Not enough gelatin? What are your thoughts?

Cheers,
Steve Smith
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#45 JanKK

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Posted 06 June 2004 - 01:19 PM

I've made them successfully with cocoa. I used 1/2 cup of cocoa, 3/4 cup water and a teaspoon of vanilla in place of the puree and water in the recipe.

Neil,

I've tried this twice and all I end up with is goop. Too much liquid? Not enough gelatin? What are your thoughts?

Cheers,

I made these this week and they turned out perfectly!

How much water did you use total? I admit I had to read the recipe and variation directions over a few times - and this is what I came up with (and I figure I must have done it correctly, cuz they turned out ;)

The strawberry recipe calls for 1/2 cup strawberry puree and 1 1/4 cups water total - 1/2 cup with the puree and 3/4 cup with the sugar. For the chocolate, it should be 1/2 cup cocoa and 1 1/2 cups water total- 3/4 cup with the cocoa and 3/4 cup with the sugar.

#46 nightscotsman

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Posted 06 June 2004 - 02:41 PM

I've made them successfully with cocoa. I used 1/2 cup of cocoa, 3/4 cup water and a teaspoon of vanilla in place of the puree and water in the recipe.

Neil,

I've tried this twice and all I end up with is goop. Too much liquid? Not enough gelatin? What are your thoughts?

Cheers,

I made these this week and they turned out perfectly!

How much water did you use total? I admit I had to read the recipe and variation directions over a few times - and this is what I came up with (and I figure I must have done it correctly, cuz they turned out ;)

The strawberry recipe calls for 1/2 cup strawberry puree and 1 1/4 cups water total - 1/2 cup with the puree and 3/4 cup with the sugar. For the chocolate, it should be 1/2 cup cocoa and 1 1/2 cups water total- 3/4 cup with the cocoa and 3/4 cup with the sugar.

Yep, that's correct. Sorry the directions were confusing. I'll try to edit the recipe so it's more clear.

#47 stscam

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Posted 09 June 2004 - 02:10 PM

VEGAN/KOSHER MARSHMALLOWS

One of my customers gave me a bag of Emes Vegetarian Gelatine to try to make marshmallows with. I found a receipe here that seemed to work very well (in fact, it set up much faster than with the sheet gelatine I usually use). I don't know much about the Emes, but the woman who gave it to me said it was Kosher.

Cheers,
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#48 stscam

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Posted 19 June 2004 - 11:22 AM

I have been thinking and thinking about my Kosher marshmallows and I think Kojel simply won't work because (1) it is a fast acting gelling agent  and (2) once set it you can't do anything to it anymore - it can't be set, melted and re-set like agar or gelatine.

Kew,

I was given some Emes Kosher Jel to try for marshmallows. As you can see from my last post, it worked very well. Like regular gelatine, it soaks in cold water for a bit to soften. In fact, we're switching to Emes for all our marshmallows because the texture is better and they're easier to handle. There are a couple of places you can order them on the web. Dunno if they'll ship overseas, but it's worth a try. Use the plain, not the flavored.

Cheers,
Steve Smith
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#49 JustKay

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Posted 20 June 2004 - 05:54 PM

Kew,

I was given some Emes Kosher Jel to try for marshmallows. As you can see from my last post, it worked very well. Like regular gelatine, it soaks in cold water for a bit to soften. In fact, we're switching to Emes for all our marshmallows because the texture is better and they're easier to handle. There are a couple of places you can order them on the web. Dunno if they'll ship overseas, but it's worth a try. Use the plain, not the flavored.

Cheers,

stscam,

Thanks for the heads-up.

For time being, I've found gelatine powder from Australia that's Halal certified at one of the local hypermarkets.

But, it's good to know something else that will work.

Thanks again! (And would you be so kind so as to share your marshmallow recipe? :biggrin: )

#50 mktye

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Posted 22 July 2004 - 06:22 AM

I also want to add my thanks to nightscotsman for posting that recipe. The whole process seemed so easy that I was worried it would not work. I was thinking: "surely there must be some trick." But, no. :smile: I made the recipe exactly as written with no problems whatsoever.

I am also looking forward to trying other flavors. But I'll have to make half-batches, since Mr. mktye does not like marshmallows and I cannot eat a whole batch by myself. Of course, I could share them with hillvalley if she did not have such an aversion to crossing the Potomac... :wink:

#51 stscam

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Posted 22 July 2004 - 08:32 AM

We tried making banana marshmallows. I do not recommend banana. The texture was so wierd that my first reaction was to spit the cube out. But the flavor lingered and made me queasy. Perhaps this was because we used very ripe bananas. Perhaps if we had used greenish bananas the formula would have worked. But I'll never know. I have no plans to try this flavor again.

Another thing we've been doing is piping choclolate marshmallow into a silcone toy bear mold. We're using chocolate chips for the eyes. We powder them with a cocoa mixture. Customers love them. We had a little trouble with the "eyes" migrating under the pressure of the piping. One bear ended up with eyes in his ears, looking for all the world like a fuzzy frog. One turned out to be a cyclops with a tasty belly button. The first batch we did was vanilla, and the bears closely resembled the Ewoks in Star Wars.

Fun with marshmallows!

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#52 hillvalley

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Posted 22 July 2004 - 09:18 AM

Glad you liked them, hill :smile: . They really are super easy to make and keep forever. If you give the recipe a try yourself and use another flavor, be sure to let us know how they came out. I've been thinking about experimenting with pumpkin myself.

Unfortunately I don't have a hand or stand mixer. There is just no more room in the kitchen for any more appliances! Someday, though. I think raspberry would be good too.

I have found the strawberry flavor more pronounced after a few days compared to when they were 24 hrs. old. Is this just my pathetic taste buds?


mktye, for your marshmallows (and bread, but that's another thread) I would even cross over the Potomac into your foreign territory :smile:

stscam, I can't believe how cheap you sell your marshmallows for! Here in DC you could get at least twice that. The smores sound wonderful. Does the chocolate mask the flavor of the marshmallow? Have you tried them with the cinammon sugar covered grahms?
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#53 alacarte

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Posted 22 July 2004 - 10:31 AM

Is there a way to make homemade marshmallows without using corn syrup?

For example, would a simple syrup (using sugar) work well or backfire?

#54 Joni

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Posted 22 July 2004 - 11:31 AM

I made passionfruit ones for valentine's day and gave them to friends...one friend said she "hit" hers for about 3 weeks and ate them...said the flavor was very intensed and even more wonderful later...at first, I was horrified and had told my other friends to eat them right away ...did not realize that they keep for so long!

Do you think you can use the Torani syrups for flavorings..i.e. blueberry, etc?

#55 nightscotsman

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Posted 22 July 2004 - 02:30 PM

Is there a way to make homemade marshmallows without using corn syrup?

For example, would a simple syrup (using sugar) work well or backfire?

I think you could probably use all sugar, though the mouth-feel might not be as creamy and they would be a bit sweeter (corn syrup has a lower sweetening power than sucrose). You could also use glucose if that is easier for you to find.

Do you think you can use the Torani syrups for flavorings..i.e. blueberry, etc?

Possibly, but Torani syrups contain a lot of sugar which you would have to rebalance the recipe for. I think you would get much better quality from unsweetened ingredients like fruit purees, spices, cocoa and such.

#56 KatieM

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Posted 26 July 2004 - 07:58 AM

Neil, I made three batches of your marshmallows this weekend - vanilla, strawberry, and chocolate. I'm working on making a Neopolitan Marshmallow Tray as a nice add-on for my special occasion cake business. This is one thing that could actually be profitable, since the ingredients are not very expensive. Of course, I may call them "Neil Robertson Marshmallows", or "Nightscotsman Marshmallows" which would give them a fun sort of intrigue, and also give you credit. :wink:

The strawberry marshmallows were DIVINE, and the vanilla ones turned out great as well. The chocolate ones didn't have quite the same volume, and the cocoa didn't dissolve all the way, so I'm going to have to experiment with that one. Since the gelatin needs to bloom in cold liquid, I'm thinking I might dissolve the cocoa in boiling water and then cool before using. When I did them this weekend, I just sort of combined the cocoa and water in the mixer bowl. Duh, no wonder it didn't dissove completely. Any suggestions for getting more volume out of the chocolate ones?

Is anyone else reminded of Count Chocula cereal when they eat the chocolate ones? Obviously, these marshmallows are not hard little pellets, but big soft, creamy ones, but still. Makes me wonder why my mother fed me candy for breakfast as a child! :blink:


These marshmallows are awesome! I'm finding myself inventing reasons to make them now, since they are so easy! My roommate and I are having a party this coming weekend, so we've decided to somehow incorporate s'mores into the theme (also, fun with torches!).


Also, does anyone have any suggestions for making lemon marshmallows? I think the acidity of lemon juice might mess with the gelling power of the gelatin, but maybe I'm wrong. Obviously, lemon curd is out, because of the fat. I'm thinking of using lemon zest and lemon extract, but if anyone has made them, let me know.

Thanks for sharing your recipe, Neil!

:wub: Katie


Edited to add that I am definitely going to try pumpkin marshmallows for Thanksgiving. I'll probably reduce the pumpkin puree to intensify the flavor (I know, I'll be adding water back, but I still think it would help). I'll probably add pumpkin pie spices to the marsmallows themselves AND to the dusting powder, like I added cocoa powder to the dusting mixture for the chocolate ones.

Edited by KatieM, 26 July 2004 - 08:03 AM.

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#57 alacarte

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Posted 26 July 2004 - 01:06 PM

Is there a way to make homemade marshmallows without using corn syrup?

For example, would a simple syrup (using sugar) work well or backfire?

I think you could probably use all sugar, though the mouth-feel might not be as creamy and they would be a bit sweeter (corn syrup has a lower sweetening power than sucrose). You could also use glucose if that is easier for you to find.

Thanks, nightscotsman!

#58 nightscotsman

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Posted 26 July 2004 - 02:22 PM

Neil, I made three batches of your marshmallows this weekend - vanilla, strawberry, and chocolate. I'm working on making a Neopolitan Marshmallow Tray as a nice add-on for my special occasion cake business. This is one thing that could actually be profitable, since the ingredients are not very expensive.

Yep, that's where pastry chefs make their money - selling air and water. :wink:

The strawberry marshmallows were DIVINE, and the vanilla ones turned out great as well. The chocolate ones didn't have quite the same volume, and the cocoa didn't dissolve all the way, so I'm going to have to experiment with that one. Since the gelatin needs to bloom in cold liquid, I'm thinking I might dissolve the cocoa in boiling water and then cool before using. When I did them this weekend, I just sort of combined the cocoa and water in the mixer bowl. Duh, no wonder it didn't dissove completely. Any suggestions for getting more volume out of the chocolate ones?

I'm very happy you like them and the recipe works for you. If you would like more volume from the chocolate ones, you might try using less cocoa. They won't be as strongly flavored, but the mixture should foam better. You're right about dissolving the cocoa in hot water and letting it cool. That's actually what I did and I should have mentioned it in the recipe.

Also, does anyone have any suggestions for making lemon marshmallows? I think the acidity of lemon juice might mess with the jelling power of the gelatin, but maybe I'm wrong. Obviously, lemon curd is out, because of the fat. I'm thinking of using lemon zest and lemon extract, but if anyone has made them, let me know.

The acid in lemon juice shouldn't affect the gelatine at all. It's only an enzyme in some fresh tropical fruits that you have to watch out for. So using lemon juice and zest (or lemon oil) should work fine. Orange might be another nice flavor to try, maybe with a bit of orange flower water and vanilla.

#59 Joni

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Posted 26 July 2004 - 03:45 PM

Katie...if you have access to any Perfect Puree...try making them with this. I used the passionfruit to make marshmallows and it is absolutly delicious. I get it from a wholesaler who sells to restaurants, etc. Only problem is that you have to buy a case (6 jars)..but they are frozen and you can use in other recipes, etc.

#60 Marmish

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Posted 26 July 2004 - 04:06 PM

I saw this thread when it started, and so far have resisted the temptation to make marshmallows. But, this is the week.

Stupid question. What size pan should I use? A "sheet pan" to me means something bigger than what one has in a home kitchen.

Edited to add that I intend to use Nightscotsman's recipe from recipegullet.

Edited by Marmish, 26 July 2004 - 04:16 PM.






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