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Pate de Fruit (Fruit Paste/Fruit Jellies)

Confections

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495 replies to this topic

#481 Kerry Beal

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 03:32 PM

Yup - works fine with your own purees.

#482 chiantiglace

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 09:50 AM

Blueberry has enough pectin to make its own pate de fruit, you don't even need to add apple pectin if you don't want, but you can for a garuntee. And typically the most commonly used pectins are apple pectin and citrus pectin (pectin juane). Test the firmness of your pate de fruit with ice water. Use a spoon to extract a small amount, place it in the ice water until cool and touch it for firmness. Continue cooking the pate until you get the texture you want. You can also quickly strain the pate right before setting it to remove the graininess. Also, the myth about it being irreversible is simply that, a myth. You can gently melt down the pate de fruit and continue cooking, once its in liquid form, to your desired texture.
Dean Anthony Anderson
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#483 Kerry Beal

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 02:57 PM

Blueberry has enough pectin to make its own pate de fruit, you don't even need to add apple pectin if you don't want, but you can for a garuntee. And typically the most commonly used pectins are apple pectin and citrus pectin (pectin juane). Test the firmness of your pate de fruit with ice water. Use a spoon to extract a small amount, place it in the ice water until cool and touch it for firmness. Continue cooking the pate until you get the texture you want. You can also quickly strain the pate right before setting it to remove the graininess. Also, the myth about it being irreversible is simply that, a myth. You can gently melt down the pate de fruit and continue cooking, once its in liquid form, to your desired texture.


Not all pectins are reversible.

#484 Kerry Beal

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 04:43 PM

DSCN0733.jpg

30 seconds in the microwave - a bit of bubbling - measures 74º C

DSCN0734.jpg

Total of 60 seconds in the microwave - 113º C - falling apart - but not melted.

#485 emmalish

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 09:54 PM

I'm late to the party, but I've been attempting to make pate de fruit the last week or so. I've been using the old Boiron instructions for raspberry (thanks Kerry!), using my own purée.

The first time I tried was a complete bust because I didn't know there were different kinds of pectin (oops). So I ordered a bag of slow set apple pectin from Qzina. When it came, it was clearly labelled "jam pectin" (with a helpful photo of a jar of jam). I looked up the manufacturer's website and it states "Our pectin is specially designed to jellify and stabilize jam or for making "Pate de Fruit". And the label states "100% Apple Pectin." So I decided to give it a try.

First attempt came out thick and jammy, and it didn't set up properly. I thought that might have been my fault because when I added the bulk of the sugar the temperature dropped below 185°F (one of the hints on the Boiron sheet). So I tried again and paid careful attention to the temperatures. Nope. Same thing happened. It began thickening as soon as I added the pectin. But it doesn't gel completely and I'm still able to pour it even after adding the lemon juice @ the end (although gloopy) and wrangle it into the pan. I cooked it a bit longer this time around and it seems to be setting up better (to soon to tell for sure).

I've been adding the pectin after the fruit purée reaches a boil, but before the bulk of the sugar, per the Boiron sheet. I'm wondering whether I should try adding it towards the end of the process instead. In Greweling's At Home, the pectin isn't added until all the other ingredients reach the final temperature, but that recipe is formulated for supermarket pectin, so I'm not sure if that makes a difference.

Any ideas? Advice?

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?


#486 Kerry Beal

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:15 AM

dhardy123 and I were never able to get the jam pectin to make a decent PDF. I got it from Baker's Warehouse. You can get stuff from Snowcap where you are - perhaps buy some pectin from them?

#487 emmalish

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 10:59 AM

I just contacted Qzina and they do carry a pate de fruit pectin. My fault - when I searched their system I was looking for "apple pectin" and only the slow set and a reversible pectin showed up. I'll give it another shot. Hopefully I can try this weekend.

What I made last night did end up setting perfectly, and it's definitely going to be edible, but the texture is all wrong. I'm happy to know that the problem isn't just me really sucking at making pate de fruit.

Edited by emmalish, 04 December 2012 - 11:32 AM.

I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?


#488 minas6907

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 08:00 PM

Hey all, I got a question for you who make pate de fruit on a regular basis. I know it's quite simple to pour the finished pate de fruit into a frame, but does anyone here use a confectionery funnel to deposit them into forms? I'm asking because in Notters 'Art of the Chocolatier' it seems his primary way of making the jellies is to deposit the mixture into a flexipan, and his alternate method is to pour it into a frame. I'm wondering simply if anyone does/has done this before. The jellies seem to set quite quickly, and I'm not sure if you just need to be super fast with this or not. I want to try it, but shy away (I need to get appropriate forms first) because I keep feeling like I'll end up with half the mixture deposited and the other half solidified in the funnel. I assume warming the stainless funnel will aid the process, but I also assume that you have one attempt at this, and you cant rewarm the mixture as you would with fondant or gummies. Anyways, just a question I wanted to put out there. Thanks!

#489 Kerry Beal

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 05:47 AM

Hey all, I got a question for you who make pate de fruit on a regular basis. I know it's quite simple to pour the finished pate de fruit into a frame, but does anyone here use a confectionery funnel to deposit them into forms? I'm asking because in Notters 'Art of the Chocolatier' it seems his primary way of making the jellies is to deposit the mixture into a flexipan, and his alternate method is to pour it into a frame. I'm wondering simply if anyone does/has done this before. The jellies seem to set quite quickly, and I'm not sure if you just need to be super fast with this or not. I want to try it, but shy away (I need to get appropriate forms first) because I keep feeling like I'll end up with half the mixture deposited and the other half solidified in the funnel. I assume warming the stainless funnel will aid the process, but I also assume that you have one attempt at this, and you cant rewarm the mixture as you would with fondant or gummies. Anyways, just a question I wanted to put out there. Thanks!


There is slow set pectin available for projects such as this - otherwise work really fast and really small batches.

#490 mkayahara

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 06:10 AM

I've poured pate de fruit base into flexipan forms just by transferring it into a plastic deli container and pouring it out into the mold. (It was the beet pate de fruit recipe from Next: Paris 1906, shown in my avatar off to the left there.) I would be a little worried about a confectionery funnel getting clogged.
Matthew Kayahara
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#491 sarlhar1

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 04:39 PM

Hi there-

 

I have been reading this entire thread for help with my Pate de fruit.  I have boiron cherry fruit puree, used their recipe, and it did not set whatsoever.  I then tried re-heating it, adding double the amount of pectin and some additional sugar, and it still did not set up. 

 

Has anyone had success with their recipe for cherry pate de fruit? Does anyone have an alternate recipe? Is apple pectin that crucial to the process?

 

I have so much puree!! I'd love any and all help y'all can give me!



#492 Kerry Beal

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 05:19 PM

Hi there-

 

I have been reading this entire thread for help with my Pate de fruit.  I have boiron cherry fruit puree, used their recipe, and it did not set whatsoever.  I then tried re-heating it, adding double the amount of pectin and some additional sugar, and it still did not set up. 

 

Has anyone had success with their recipe for cherry pate de fruit? Does anyone have an alternate recipe? Is apple pectin that crucial to the process?

 

I have so much puree!! I'd love any and all help y'all can give me!

Did you not use apple pectin?



#493 lebowits

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Posted 03 December 2013 - 04:23 PM

 

Hi there-

 

I have been reading this entire thread for help with my Pate de fruit.  I have boiron cherry fruit puree, used their recipe, and it did not set whatsoever.  I then tried re-heating it, adding double the amount of pectin and some additional sugar, and it still did not set up. 

 

Has anyone had success with their recipe for cherry pate de fruit? Does anyone have an alternate recipe? Is apple pectin that crucial to the process?

 

I have so much puree!! I'd love any and all help y'all can give me!

Did you not use apple pectin?

 

I've used both apple pectin and so called "yellow" pectin.  Have you diluted the tartaric acid with an equal weight of water and added the proper amount at the end?


Steve Lebowitz
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#494 Becca Porter

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 06:30 PM

I am dying to make pate de fruits. I'm getting apple pectin from L'Epicerie tomorrow. I need to know how to make my own purée without a refractometer. Does every fruit have added sugar? Are they cooked at all, or just puréed? Can I just add 10% sugar to the purée by weight? Thanks.
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#495 Kerry Beal

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 08:05 PM

I think the fruit purees have sugar added to help when freezing - you'll probably be fine just making a puree without any added sugar.  I cook the fruit just long enough to allow it to be passed though the fine plate on the food mill.  



#496 ElainaA

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 02:55 PM

This may be considered heresy but I make pate de fruit starting with jelly or jam rather than fruit puree. I like this because I preserve so much - this year I made pate from an orange-pinot noir jelly, blackberry jelly and green apple jelly. Last year I did a raspberry-cherry jam pate that tasted really good. They all set up well, have a nice texture and, to me, taste very good. Since I have never made the fruit puree version I can't really compare. I have gotten very good feed back on these from people to whom I have given them.

Elaina


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