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Molded Chocolates: Technique Questions [MERGED TOPIC]

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#61 Lior

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 11:23 PM

Thanks Steve for your advice! It is amazing how one can always pick up a new tip!!! :biggrin:
The acetate method is actually not too messy. Liek a transfer sheet that comes off clean-from the magnetic mold. Yes, you scrape on top of the acetate which is ON top of the chocolate. If you put too much extra choc it will get on the sides otherwise it just comes off the end of the mold at the last place you swipe. Even if it does get on the sides a bit it is easy to scrape off as the mold is sitting on the counter just goe down the side. The extra bit of choc can be reused.

Next I will try Steve's method.

I just remembered last night that Schneich once gave a link to a utube video from some chocolate exhibition he was at and I think the demonstrator used this acetate closing method. Here !! I just found it!acetate method

Edited by Lior, 30 October 2008 - 11:28 PM.


#62 Anna N

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 01:37 AM

. . .

I just remembered last night that Schneich once gave a link to a utube video from some chocolate exhibition he was at and I think the demonstrator used this acetate closing method. Here !! I just found it!acetate method

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Thanks for finding that video. I was having a hard time visualizing how the acetate was being used and now I get it, finally. :smile:
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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#63 pastrygirl

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 03:48 AM

What are the advantages of the acetate? Shiny bottoms? The knife doesn't drag on the chocolate so no holes? You can keep re-using the acetate, right?

#64 John DePaula

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 07:42 AM

Thanks Steve for your advice! It is amazing how one can always pick up a new tip!!! :biggrin:
The acetate method is actually not too messy. Liek a transfer sheet that comes off clean-from the magnetic mold. Yes, you scrape on top of the acetate which is ON top of the chocolate. If you put too much extra choc it will get on the sides otherwise it just comes off the end of the mold at the last place you swipe. Even if it does get on the sides a bit it is easy to scrape off as the mold is sitting on the counter just goe down the side. The extra bit of choc can be reused.

Next I will try Steve's method.

I just remembered last night that Schneich once gave a link to a utube video from some chocolate exhibition he was at and I think the demonstrator used this acetate closing method. Here !! I just found it!acetate method

View Post

Just FYI: The acetate technique begins at time index 1:16 / 9:54.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#65 John DePaula

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 07:43 AM

What are the advantages of the acetate?  Shiny bottoms?  The knife doesn't drag on the chocolate so no holes?  You can keep re-using the acetate, right?

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I suppose you could reuse it but not sure it would be worth the trouble to clean it each time.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#66 ejw50

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 08:06 PM

Thanks Steve for your advice! It is amazing how one can always pick up a new tip!!! :biggrin:
The acetate method is actually not too messy. Liek a transfer sheet that comes off clean-from the magnetic mold. Yes, you scrape on top of the acetate which is ON top of the chocolate. If you put too much extra choc it will get on the sides otherwise it just comes off the end of the mold at the last place you swipe. Even if it does get on the sides a bit it is easy to scrape off as the mold is sitting on the counter just goe down the side. The extra bit of choc can be reused.

Next I will try Steve's method.

I just remembered last night that Schneich once gave a link to a utube video from some chocolate exhibition he was at and I think the demonstrator used this acetate closing method. Here !! I just found it!acetate method

View Post


great memory! And thanks for the video.

I still have to say it looks messier this way.



In this method in the video, it looks like the chocolate gets all over the table from the mold when it is set down. Then chocolate gets on the bottom of the mold from the table. Then you "track" chocolate even more places when you put the mold down to set. And the excess off the side when you scrape. Plus the acetate when you take it off and set it down somewhere. I was also surprised to see the guy wasn't using gloves but maybe that is a difference between American and Euro production.



The other way, the chocolate only goes from the mold to the melter (mostly) with nothing on the table or even your hands.

#67 Lior

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Posted 21 November 2008 - 04:18 AM

Well I took some photos I hope you can tell that the bottoms are nice and shiny! The odd thing is that even when there was a bit of a mess- there really was not much, on the side of the mold and on the baking sheet, it seemed to just pop off the mold and peel so clean and shiny off the baking sheet. The chocoalte on the side of the mold came off in one long shiny piece. Iwonder why this happened??

Posted Image

post acetate

Posted Image

#68 sote23

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Posted 22 November 2008 - 11:59 PM

Lior,
Thanks for posting the pics. your chocolates look great. I'm going to try that technique in the next few days.
Luis

#69 Lior

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 12:13 AM

:rolleyes:

#70 gap

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 12:53 AM

I also use this technique quite often with transfer sheets instead of acetate to get a print on the bottom of the chocolate and, like Lior said, its not really that messy once you get the technique down.

#71 Lior

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 03:45 AM

:biggrin:

#72 ejw50

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 05:41 PM

Those are backed off beautifully. Thanks for the pics!

I'll trust you guys on the mess factor. Maybe that guy in the video is just messy.

#73 gap

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 06:01 PM

Those are backed off beautifully.  Thanks for the pics!

I'll trust you guys on the mess factor.  Maybe that guy in the video is just messy.

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The trick to minimising mess is to use the minimum amount of chocolate that allows you to scrape across and get the acetate to stick - you usually get the amount right in 3 or 4 moulds

#74 Anna N

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 07:07 PM

Those are backed off beautifully.  Thanks for the pics!

I'll trust you guys on the mess factor.  Maybe that guy in the video is just messy.

View Post


The trick to minimising mess is to use the minimum amount of chocolate that allows you to scrape across and get the acetate to stick - you usually get the amount right in 3 or 4 moulds

View Post


I tried this technique tonight and it does require a certain level of experimentation - not enough chocolate and you don't get the smoothness, too much and you get a mess. Tonight I did not leave enough chocolate and hence had some "dips". I will try again tomorrow.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#75 John DePaula

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 08:07 PM

Those are backed off beautifully.  Thanks for the pics!

I'll trust you guys on the mess factor.  Maybe that guy in the video is just messy.

View Post


The trick to minimising mess is to use the minimum amount of chocolate that allows you to scrape across and get the acetate to stick - you usually get the amount right in 3 or 4 moulds

View Post


I tried this technique tonight and it does require a certain level of experimentation - not enough chocolate and you don't get the smoothness, too much and you get a mess. Tonight I did not leave enough chocolate and hence had some "dips". I will try again tomorrow.

View Post

It really looks tricky to me, Anna, but I want to try it soon. Please let us know if you come across a good method.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#76 sote23

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Posted 23 November 2008 - 11:44 PM

I also use this technique quite often with transfer sheets instead of acetate to get a print on the bottom of the chocolate and, like Lior said, its not really that messy once you get the technique down.

View Post



so you put a transfer on the bottom. Interesting. any pics?
Luis

#77 Lior

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 01:41 AM

Here is a picture of when I did the transfer on the back of the bar a week or so ago. I put chocolate on row one-near me and then haphazardly squiggle chocolate here and there, and it worked very nicely, not too little and only slight mess. As said earlier, the mess was incredibly easy to clean-shiny and peeled straight off all surfaces.
Posted Image

Edited by Lior, 24 November 2008 - 01:41 AM.


#78 Anna N

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 07:25 AM

Those are backed off beautifully.  Thanks for the pics!

I'll trust you guys on the mess factor.  Maybe that guy in the video is just messy.

View Post


The trick to minimising mess is to use the minimum amount of chocolate that allows you to scrape across and get the acetate to stick - you usually get the amount right in 3 or 4 moulds

View Post


I tried this technique tonight and it does require a certain level of experimentation - not enough chocolate and you don't get the smoothness, too much and you get a mess. Tonight I did not leave enough chocolate and hence had some "dips". I will try again tomorrow.

View Post

It really looks tricky to me, Anna, but I want to try it soon. Please let us know if you come across a good method.

View Post


It really is not difficult. I did it again this morning using a transfer on the back of a mold of solid chocolate. However, I managed to get a wrinkle in there! :angry: I would have shared a photo but my daughter borrowed my camera!

I am not esp. interested in getting shiny backs but very interested in putting a transfer on the back of some molds. Next challenge will be to try and back off filled chocolates in a similar fashion but I will use plain acetate for that. I'll let you know how it works.

If you want to try it and you have a thin mold that is good for solid chocolates I think you will find it easy to experiment with techniques. If you use plain acetate you have nothing to lose - just re- temper and try again.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#79 John DePaula

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Posted 24 November 2008 - 08:26 AM

Those are backed off beautifully.  Thanks for the pics!

I'll trust you guys on the mess factor.  Maybe that guy in the video is just messy.

View Post


The trick to minimising mess is to use the minimum amount of chocolate that allows you to scrape across and get the acetate to stick - you usually get the amount right in 3 or 4 moulds

View Post


I tried this technique tonight and it does require a certain level of experimentation - not enough chocolate and you don't get the smoothness, too much and you get a mess. Tonight I did not leave enough chocolate and hence had some "dips". I will try again tomorrow.

View Post

It really looks tricky to me, Anna, but I want to try it soon. Please let us know if you come across a good method.

View Post


It really is not difficult. I did it again this morning using a transfer on the back of a mold of solid chocolate. However, I managed to get a wrinkle in there! :angry: I would have shared a photo but my daughter borrowed my camera!

I am not esp. interested in getting shiny backs but very interested in putting a transfer on the back of some molds. Next challenge will be to try and back off filled chocolates in a similar fashion but I will use plain acetate for that. I'll let you know how it works.

If you want to try it and you have a thin mold that is good for solid chocolates I think you will find it easy to experiment with techniques. If you use plain acetate you have nothing to lose - just re- temper and try again.

View Post

I am interested in trying this technique especially for bars. When I make a chocolate bar that's just chocolate (no inclusions like nuts or fruit), it's difficult to keep the very fluid chocolate from spilling over and ruining the edge. You have to keep the mold absolutely level until it begins to crystallize a bit. Using the acetate would definitely solve that problem.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#80 Anna N

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Posted 25 November 2008 - 12:50 PM

Third attempt today with a transfer on the back of solid chocs and it worked like a charm. As someone else said, it's a matter of determining how much choc to leave on the mold and then to get the right angle of the scraper and the right wrist action.

Next up is trying it on filled chocolates but that won't be for a day or two.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#81 sote23

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 02:14 PM

Here is a picture of when I did the transfer on the back of the bar a week or so ago. I put chocolate on row one-near me and then haphazardly squiggle chocolate here and there, and it worked very nicely, not too little and only slight mess. As said earlier, the mess was incredibly easy to clean-shiny and peeled straight off all surfaces.
Posted Image

View Post



looks good.
Luis

#82 Lior

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 02:20 PM

:cool: Thanks!!!

#83 sote23

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 04:15 PM

:cool: Thanks!!!

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One quick question. I'm heading over to my kitchen in a few hours. When you put the acetate sheet and scrap it with the scraper, do you leave the acetate on while it drys or do you pull it off right away?

Luis

#84 gap

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 04:20 PM

Leave it to dry before pulling off

#85 sote23

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Posted 04 December 2008 - 05:22 PM

Leave it to dry before pulling off

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Thanks.
Luis

#86 mostlylana

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 01:33 PM

It's a little more time consuming, but if you want you can use a guitar sheet or acetate to cap your chocolates. It makes for the most 'perfect' finish and also allows you to have more filling and a less thick base. You ladle chocolate on just one edge of the mould, put the plastic so that it covers the open surface of the mould and then, using a squeegee or triangle spatula, pull the chocolate across to the other side

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I would like to try the acetate method for bottoming chocolates during the holidays. Most of the talk about this method in this thread dealt with solid chocolate. I would like to try this on filled chocolates. Anna, I think you were going to try it... did it work out for you? I was thinking you would have to sort of fill using your spatula before doing the acetate method to ensure the chocolate fills each cavity properly. I would be concerned with just using the acetate method as there might be crevices left unfilled. I would love to hear people's thoughts and experiences. HQAntithesis - it sounds like you just go for it with the acetate on your filled chocolates. Do you have any issues with unfilled spaces?

#87 Anna N

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 01:44 PM

It's a little more time consuming, but if you want you can use a guitar sheet or acetate to cap your chocolates. It makes for the most 'perfect' finish and also allows you to have more filling and a less thick base. You ladle chocolate on just one edge of the mould, put the plastic so that it covers the open surface of the mould and then, using a squeegee or triangle spatula, pull the chocolate across to the other side

View Post


I would like to try the acetate method for bottoming chocolates during the holidays. Most of the talk about this method in this thread dealt with solid chocolate. I would like to try this on filled chocolates. Anna, I think you were going to try it... did it work out for you? I was thinking you would have to sort of fill using your spatula before doing the acetate method to ensure the chocolate fills each cavity properly. I would be concerned with just using the acetate method as there might be crevices left unfilled. I would love to hear people's thoughts and experiences. HQAntithesis - it sounds like you just go for it with the acetate on your filled chocolates. Do you have any issues with unfilled spaces?

View Post


It worked fine for me with filled chocolates without pre-coating the bottoms. I gave up for the time being as I was making a bigger mess each time I tried it. :wacko:

However, it does work well and seems to make a good seal. In the meantime I have learned to work much more cleanly backing off traditionally so I have not returned to the acetate method. I expect I will give it another go soon.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#88 mostlylana

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 03:08 PM

Thanks Anna. I don't think I would use this method on a regular basis but want to use it for some special Valentine chocolates I will be making... my 'jewels'! Glad to hear you don't have to pre-coat first. It's already more work - don't want to add more!

#89 gap

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 03:46 PM

When I use transfer sheets (or acetate) on the bottom of moulded chocolates I close them as normal, let it set and then apply the transfer with a thin layer of chocolate.

#90 mostlylana

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Posted 23 December 2008 - 03:57 PM

When I use transfer sheets (or acetate) on the bottom of moulded chocolates I close them as normal, let it set and then apply the transfer with a thin layer of chocolate.

View Post


Ahhhhhh. I normally do a 'beauty coat' when bottoming traditionally. I guess doing the beauty coat using acetate would just be extra beautiful! Thanks for the tip.

.

Edited by mostlylana, 23 December 2008 - 03:58 PM.






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