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Dulce de Leche


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196 replies to this topic

#1 FoodMan

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Posted 05 September 2003 - 01:30 PM

I have made dulce de leche (kind of) using condensed milk by pouring the milk into a double broiler and cooking for A LONG TIME while stirring once in a while. It came out pretty good and I used it to make crepes, I think.
However, in Jamie Oliver's latest book "Jamie's Kitchen" he has a recipe for "Banoffee Pie" in which he says that "toffee" can be made by boiling the unopened can of condensed milk for four hours (making sure the water does not dry up)!! Now I do trust Oliver and I'm sure he knows what he's talking about, but for some reason I am afraid of having a potential milk/sugar bomb in my kitchen.
Has anyone tried that??? Does it really work??

FM

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#2 JFLinLA

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Posted 05 September 2003 - 01:52 PM

I heard about this once as a way to make Dulce de Leche. I think it was from a guest on Evan Kleiman's Good Food on KCRW. They also said to boil the can of condensed milk, keeping it covered with water, for a long time. I don't remember how long. Then leave the can to cool in the water.

Let us know how it turns out.
So long and thanks for all the fish.

#3 rickster

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Posted 05 September 2003 - 01:59 PM

I've heard of this too, but never tried it. I think it's in Rick Bayless' Mexican Kitchen recipe for tres leches cake using condensed goats milk.

#4 Katherine

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Posted 05 September 2003 - 02:11 PM

That's the way I always make it. I've never had a problem. Yum, it's about that time.

#5 Bond Girl

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Posted 05 September 2003 - 02:23 PM

The Union Square Cafe Cook book I think has it done the milk/sugar bomb way. You have to make sure it's completely submerged in water and cook it forever. I personally will not try it since my kitchen is very small so damage may be catastrophic.
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#6 KatieLoeb

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Posted 05 September 2003 - 02:36 PM

I just called my old boss Guillermo, who is the one that taught me this trick. I asked him specifically about putting small holes in the cans to prevent explosions and he said it's unnecessary. He puts as many cans of sweetened condensed milk as will fit standing into a very large stockpot. He said to completely submerge the cans in water, heat to a rolling boil and then turn down to a heavy simmer and boil the hell out of them for 4 to 5 hours. Make sure they stay submerged. Let them cool. Open can and use for whatever you'd like. It's great drizzled over cake, as a puddle of sauce under another dessert, or just off the end of a really big spoon. This stuff is indescribably delicious. I could eat it with a spoon (and I'm ashamed to say I have once or twice :blush: ) but it's just amazing in texture and caramelized flavor. I trust the source implicitly. He's a great chef and very into making things simpler rather than more complicated.

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#7 FoodMan

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Posted 05 September 2003 - 02:41 PM

Thanks for the advise, I will try it and it seems the main thing everyone agrees on (including Oliver) is to keep them submerged. I think I might try that Banoffee Tart or just a simple Dulce De Leche Tart.
In the recipe he also mentions that you can keep them in your pantry for a long time ,if not opened, after you boil them, sort of like "Dulce De Leche" for a rainy day kinda thing. That was another point that made me want to try it and boil a few cans :smile: .

FM

Edited by FoodMan, 05 September 2003 - 02:46 PM.

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#8 kitwilliams

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Posted 05 September 2003 - 03:05 PM

Yes, as most eveyone has stated, an unopened can, completely submerged. I learned it from Susan Feniger and Mary Sue Milliken's show and the single difference is that they turned the cans midway through the cooking process. Sounds as if it might be unnecessary considering the fact that no one else mentioned it and they seemed to get the same, tasty, eat-it-off-the-spoon kind of results!
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#9 fifi

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Posted 05 September 2003 - 04:11 PM

I have done this for years. I usually wait for the stuff to go on sale. It usually does around the holidays. I do 8 - 10 cans at a time. I get my big canning pot out, put a dishcloth in the bottom so I don't have to hear the cans clatter, and simmer away for about 4 hours. It is a good idea to scrub off the label adhesive before you do this so you don't gunk up your pot.
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#10 elyse

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Posted 05 September 2003 - 07:02 PM

Good advice, fifi.

I always have to say thi whenever the subject comes up: do NOT under ANY circumstances open the can until it is completely cool. You will regret it till your dying day.

#11 fifi

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Posted 05 September 2003 - 07:48 PM

Good advice, fifi. 

I always have to say thi whenever the subject comes up:  do NOT under ANY circumstances open the can until it is completely cool.  You will regret it till your dying day.

Thanks for bringing that up. I should have mentioned that. Well... maybe put it in big letters. My bad. Especially since I am a safety freak.

Don't open a hot can, you idiot!

(The loud voice of experience has spoken.)
Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

#12 aprilmei

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Posted 05 September 2003 - 08:00 PM

I've made it this way before, but I don't boil it. I do bring the pot of water (with the can of condensed milk) to a simmer, put on the lid and then turn the heat way down, as low as it will go. I usually cook it 3-4 hours, topping up the water whenever it gets too low, and then let it cool in the water.

But I have heard of a can blowing up - happened to a friend of a friend. She had caramel on her ceiling. My friend said it smelled good - too bad she didn't get to taste it.

#13 Myste

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Posted 05 September 2003 - 11:19 PM

This sounds interesting. I assume you're using sweetened condensed milk, not evaporated milk? (Just making sure... not sure what it'd do to evaporated milk)

#14 fifi

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Posted 05 September 2003 - 11:22 PM

Yep... sweetened condensed milk.
Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

#15 MGLloyd

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Posted 06 September 2003 - 02:03 PM

I used to make caramel by boiling the cans, as mentioned earlier in this topic. Then I found an easier way.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees

Pour one 14 oz. can sweetened condensed milk into a 9 inch glass pie plate

Place the pie plate into a bain marie (larger pan filled with hot water to the level of the milk in the pie plate)

Put bain marie into oven and bake for approximately 90 -120 minutes or until very thick and caramel colored. Color and consistency, as opposed to baking time, is the key to figuring out when it is done.

Stir a couple of times during baking if you wish.

Turn out of the pie plate while still warm into a mixing bowl and beat until smooth. The mixture will thicken as it cools.


Variations I have heard of:

Some people crank the oven up to 450 degrees and finish it in approximately 60 minutes

Some people cover the top with foil to prevent scorching

In my experience, setting the oven at 400 degrees and cooking for the longer time prevents scorching. Your mileage may vary, and feel free to experiment.

This method has worked well for me, and I cannot tell a difference in the finished product whether made by oven caramelizing vs. boiling the closed submerged can.

Regards,

Michael Lloyd
Mill Creek, Washington USA

Regards,

Michael Lloyd
Mill Creek, Washington USA

#16 fifi

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Posted 06 September 2003 - 05:55 PM

When I worked at FDA years ago we used to put pans of the stuff in the autoclave and let it go for a couple of hours so I know the pan method works. I just think it is a lot of trouble and you dirty dishes. A big pot with lots of water can sit at barely simmering for 4 hours without any attention. Then you can just put the cans in the pantry.
Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

#17 schnitzel

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Posted 07 September 2003 - 05:28 AM

There is a much quicker way.

Use a pressure cooker as they do in Brazil, it's called "doce de leite" in Portuguese.

Place a can of sweetened condensed milk (paper label removed) in the pressure cooker with water going halfway up the can.
Do not use the rack and avoid dented cans.

Bring up to pressure (15 lb) and depending on the desired consistency:
15 minutes is enough for a soft, spreadable consistency.
25 minutes will give you a thicker, darker product.
Any longer and you'll be able to slice it.

Slowly release the pan's pressure and just let it be.
Cool to room temperature before attempting to open the can.
~Amy

#18 sandra

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Posted 07 September 2003 - 12:32 PM

I used to make caramel by boiling the cans, as mentioned earlier in this topic.  Then I found an easier way. 

Preheat oven to 400 degrees

Pour one 14 oz. can sweetened condensed milk into a 9 inch glass pie plate

Place the pie plate into a bain marie (larger pan filled with hot water to the level of the milk in the pie plate)

Put bain marie into oven and bake for approximately 90 -120 minutes or until very thick and caramel colored.  Color and consistency, as opposed to baking time, is the key to figuring out when it is done.

Stir a couple of times during baking if you wish.

Turn out of the pie plate while still warm into a mixing bowl and beat until smooth.  The mixture will thicken as it cools.


Variations I have heard of:

Some people crank the oven up to 450 degrees and finish it in approximately 60 minutes

Some people cover the top with foil to prevent scorching

In my experience, setting the oven at 400 degrees and cooking for the longer time prevents scorching.  Your mileage may vary, and feel free to experiment.

This method has worked well for me, and I cannot tell a difference in the finished product whether made by oven caramelizing vs. boiling the closed submerged can.

Regards,

Michael Lloyd
Mill Creek, Washington  USA

WOW, if you're going to this much trouble, why not just make the real thing:

3 liters milk
800 gr sugar
1 vanilla pod
1/2 tea baking soda

Boil the milk, add the sugar, vanilla and bicarbonate - boil again on high heat and stir with wooden spoon continuosly until it thickens and becomes golden caramel colour - spoon out a small amount, if it's not runny, it's ready - dip the base of the pot in ice water. stir a bit more an leave to cool.

This usually takes under and hour.

The stuff in the can is good, but it's a totally different animal to dulce de leche, we call it telegoo (don't know why..)
www.nutropical.com
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#19 BettyK

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Posted 07 September 2003 - 12:41 PM

WOW, if you're going to this much trouble, why not just make the real thing:

3 liters milk
800 gr sugar
1 vanilla pod
1/2 tea baking soda

Boil the milk, add the sugar, vanilla and bicarbonate - boil again on high heat and stir with wooden spoon continuosly until it thickens and becomes golden caramel colour - spoon out a small amount, if it's not runny, it's ready - dip the base of the pot in ice water. stir a bit more an leave to cool.

This usually takes under and hour.

The stuff in the can is good, but it's a totally different animal to dulce de leche, we call it telegoo (don't know why..)


I'd buy one of these first :biggrin:

Posted Image

#20 tan319

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Posted 07 September 2003 - 12:49 PM

I usually pour the amount I want to have on hand and put it into a mid size pan, seal it w/ foil and set into another pan filled with water, cover that and bake at 400 'till it's Dulce.
I've always been paranoid about the cans.
2317/5000

#21 MGLloyd

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Posted 07 September 2003 - 01:09 PM

Bring up to pressure (15 lb) and depending on the desired consistency:
15 minutes is enough for a soft, spreadable consistency.
25 minutes will give you a thicker, darker product.
Any longer and you'll be able to slice it.

That sounds interesting with the pressure cooker insofar as I imagine the cooker is strong enough to contain any problems with ruptured cans.

Also of note was the cooking of the milk until it reaches slicing consistency. I have seen people do this, and then cut off both ends of the can and use one lid to slide the firm caramel out onto a plate whole, much like a can of jellied cranberry sauce. Then thinly slice the caramel, plate, garnish and serve.

I wonder if anyone has any data on time to either boil or pressure cook the can until it reliably reaches a slicing consistency yet without being burned or scorched.

Regards,
Michael Lloyd
Mill Creek, Washington USA

Regards,

Michael Lloyd
Mill Creek, Washington USA

#22 PastryLady

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Posted 07 September 2003 - 06:37 PM

Mmmmmm Michael, you got me thinking about Thanksgiving cranberry already!!! Pop it out of the can so you still can see the rings and slice. Yum! Sounds great with a dark chocolate sauce (the dulce. Well, I guess you could do either with choc. sauce).


Question along same topic :

Has anyone tried this with the reduced fat or even fat free types???



Just wondering if you get the same result or possibly a lighter testure/taste
Debra Diller
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#23 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 07 September 2003 - 07:37 PM

Please forgive me for not reading everyones post...if someone aready posted this-why not buy it already done? Same price, same company that makes sweetened condensed milk, ready to use Dulce de leche! Look in the Spanish section in your grocery store.

#24 FoodMan

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Posted 07 September 2003 - 09:00 PM

Ok well I did make it and I am amazed at how good it came out, I only tried it with one can as a test and it turned out perfect both consistency and taste wise.

Posted Image


Thanks for all the suggestions
FM

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Houston, TX

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#25 sandra

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Posted 08 September 2003 - 02:00 AM

Please forgive me for not reading everyones post...if someone aready posted this-why not buy it already done? Same price, same company that makes sweetened condensed milk, ready to use Dulce de leche! Look in the Spanish section in your grocery store.

Totally agree with you!

But if you're going to buy it already made, why not buy the real stuff?

I wish someone would explain to me this fascination with boiled condensed milk, when it's just as easy to make the real stuff... the taste is totally different!

Maybe it's just the will it, or will not explode factor...
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#26 bushey

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Posted 08 September 2003 - 06:55 AM

Can someone suggest creative ways to use Dulce de Leche in addition to the ones already mentioned? I'm looking for ideas for a simple but delicious dessert and don't want to go the crepe route. It's apple time in New England and I was thinking about combining the two somehow.

Edited by bushey, 08 September 2003 - 06:57 AM.


#27 KatieLoeb

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Posted 08 September 2003 - 07:13 AM

Can someone suggest creative ways to use Dulce de Leche in addition to the ones already mentioned? I'm looking for ideas for a simple but delicious dessert and don't want to go the crepe route. It's apple time in New England and I was thinking about combining the two somehow.

Apple Cobbler with Dulce de Leche drizzled on top. Droooling just thinking about it.

Cheesecake with diced apples and a ribbon of Dulce through it.

Apple bread pudding with Dulce sauce.

I'll post again if I think of others.

Katie M. Loeb
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#28 sandra

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Posted 08 September 2003 - 09:04 AM

Tarte Tatin with a big dollop on the side

Apple flan with dulce de leche on top ( a variant of the classic)

Apple cake filled and frosted with dulce de leche
www.nutropical.com
~Borojo~

#29 elyse

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Posted 08 September 2003 - 09:13 AM

Fondue.

#30 Mottmott

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Posted 08 September 2003 - 09:31 AM

[quote name='BettyK' date='Sep 7 2003, 12:41 PM'][quote name='sandra' date='Sep 7 2003, 12:32 PM']WOW, if you're going to this much trouble, why not just make the real thing:
The stuff in the can is good, but it's a totally different animal to dulce de leche, we call it telegoo (don't know why..)[/quote]...

I'd buy one of these first :biggrin:

Posted Image[/quote]
[QUOTE]

Wow! if that thing works it might be worth its space. Does it? :cool: :unsure: :blink:

If so, what do you call it, and do you have a web address?
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