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Ice Cream Machines


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#61 LaurieA-B

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Posted 03 July 2005 - 10:29 AM

New issue of Fine Cooking (Sept. 2005) has an ice cream machine test and one they recommend is the Salton Big Chill. Anyone tried it? The appealing feature is that instead of freezing the entire bowl, you freeze a disk that goes under the bowl (takes up less freezer space).
Hungry Monkey May 2009

#62 simdelish

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Posted 09 July 2005 - 04:41 PM

My new job has yet to get an ice cream maker for me... :angry: but in the meantime, one of the owner's friends, a caterer, brought in her Musso for me to use in the meantime.

For my purposes, it is a PITA, because it makes such small amounts (I get less than 2 qts out of it), and it is not easy to clean/sanitize, as there are no removable canisters, or an extruding exit to wash hot water thru. It takes me about 30-40 min to run a batch, sometimes more. When I have a big batch of some flavor, I just scoop out the first batch, don't even wipe out etc, just pour more base in and keep going.

The caterer said she hardly uses it (which is why she loaned it to me) (AND it won't pass the health inspector, so she keeps it hidden, and forgets she has it). She did say she used it for one very large NYE party, and they started cranking batches out starting at 4 or 5 pm, and didn't stop til 2 am. She said it didn't have a problem going that long.

I am fairly happy with the results, I guess an 8 out of 10. It definitely does not, for some reason, churn the mix as fine as the commercial machines I have used in the past (I found the CRM gelato maker the best of all).

For me, I have found I almost have to overdo it, as the super small batch has a tendency to start melting right away, while I am trying to scoop the stuff out and get into the freezer. The Musso does have 2 separate buttons, one for the dasher, and one for the cold/freeze. If I leave on the freeze while scooping, the edges get rock hard in a matter of seconds, which makes the mix lumpy.

I have used most of the home machines, and I would say this Musso definitely does the best job. If you are serious about ice cream, and can spring for the Musso, I would recommend it over the others. For now for me, the little Musso is doing the job at work, but it keeps my assistant busy, doing batch after batch. I am counting down the days, however, until I get a big 'un once again!
I like to cook with wine. Sometimes I even add it to the food.

#63 rmockler

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Posted 10 July 2005 - 09:36 PM

thanks all and everyone for their great, informed input.

....


So .. my question, as a once- or twice-a-year ice cream maker, is: what's wrong with the cheapo Rival-style version with the ice and the rock salt? I much prefer this to my cuisinart. Given how infrequently I make ice cream, it's a bit of a hit or miss for me perfection-wise, but I can't imagine that's the machine's fault.

Anyone have any beef with these little guys, other than the ice and rock salt hassle if you use them a lot? Are my aspirations to making perfect ice cream for naught unless I shell out for a big machine?
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#64 origamicrane

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 03:58 AM

one word
pacojet
:wub:
the ferrari of ice cream machines
"so tell me how do you bone a chicken?"

"tastes so good makes you want to slap your mamma!!"

#65 EllenC

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 07:37 AM

[/quote]

So .. my question, as a once- or twice-a-year ice cream maker, is: what's wrong with the cheapo Rival-style version with the ice and the rock salt? I much prefer this to my cuisinart. Given how infrequently I make ice cream, it's a bit of a hit or miss for me perfection-wise, but I can't imagine that's the machine's fault.

Anyone have any beef with these little guys, other than the ice and rock salt hassle if you use them a lot? Are my aspirations to making perfect ice cream for naught unless I shell out for a big machine?

View Post

[/quote]

I have a rival machine with ice and rock salt and we make ice cream two or three times a month during the summer. It works great and I get perfect results every time. We made raspberry ice cream on the 4th with fresh raspberries and it was perfect even four days later when I ate the last of it. Keep working at it - I am sure you will find a method that works in your machine.

#66 budrichard

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 01:49 PM

We have the Kitchenaid which is the 'Audi' of Frozen Dessert Makers since Ferrari does not win at Le Mans anymore! http://proline.kitch...aker_detail.asp
This is actually a pro machine and is equivalent to the machines used in many restaurants and cooking shows. No pre-freezing is needed and one can regulate the 'over run' as with commercials ice creams. I find no way to do this with the PacoJet.
It makes a lot of ice cream and it makes it fast. The ice cream can either be dispensed like soft serve or the whole front comes off to allow the frozen mixture and blades to be removed and the mixture transfered into a vessel for further hardening. -Dick

#67 tan319

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Posted 11 July 2005 - 08:28 PM

That KA looks kind of decent!
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#68 chefcyn

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Posted 12 July 2005 - 05:42 AM

[/quote]...So .. my question, as a once- or twice-a-year ice cream maker, is: what's wrong with the cheapo Rival-style version with the ice and the rock salt? I much prefer this to my cuisinart. Given how infrequently I make ice cream, it's a bit of a hit or miss for me perfection-wise, but I can't imagine that's the machine's fault.

Anyone have any beef with these little guys, other than the ice and rock salt hassle if you use them a lot? Are my aspirations to making perfect ice cream for naught unless I shell out for a big machine?
*
I have a rival machine with ice and rock salt and we make ice cream two or three times a month during the summer. It works great and I get perfect results every time. We made raspberry ice cream on the 4th with fresh raspberries and it was perfect even four days later when I ate the last of it. Keep working at it - I am sure you will find a method that works in your machine...[/quote]


I have three of these "Old fashioned" electric Ice cream machines that use rock salt and ice and they are great! One is only 1 qt, but the other two are 2 qt makers, and the only negative is that you have to find rock salt, and have lots of ice, and it's a little messy, but the results are fine. If I make up my simple syrup ahead( by the gallon or two, I can puree whatever fruits I want or get in season and combine, and in 20 min I have fabulous sorbet! Same for Ice cream, It's easiest to just use heavy cream and sugar, and flavor it with your choice of flavors for the fastest simple ice cream, but making more complex recipes don't take that much time and in 20 min in the machine, I have ice cream. How easy is that?

Minimal down time in between, too, just dump the ice and salt in a strainer(to get rid of the meltwater, clean out the ice cream container(freezing your ice cream in a nice tub), replace it, replace the remaining ice/salt, add more to fill, add your cream or sorbet base and go. I've made several batches of very different things in an easy afternoon.
And, I kinda like the white noise of the running machine in the corner of my kitchen while I do other things.
It's not the destination, but the journey!

#69 russ parsons

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 06:32 PM

I have a Cusinart and I think it works pretty well. And I got it for fifty bucks, with a second cannister thrown in, so I can make multiple 'screams at will.

View Post


busboy,
is this the dual canister cuisinart that you later referred to, or a single canister model that they included a spare. if so, where did you get it? i'm on deadline and that sounds like jsut the thing.

#70 bushey

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 06:32 AM

I just scored two ice cream makers on eBay (don't ask, I really don't know what I was thinking): the Panasonice battery-powered small one, and a gently used Rival electric 4-quart model. Total for both, shipped and all, was just under $40. Guess I'd better start looking for ice cream and sorbet recipes.............................

#71 tan319

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Posted 07 August 2005 - 07:23 PM

I was in a Williams Sonoma today and saw this CuisineArt ice cream machine with a built in freezer compressor for 249 bucks.Has anyone used it/bought it?
http://ww2.williams-...m...1|rshop/hme

What do you think?
The KA Pro Line looks great, it's built like a Taylor but this CuisineArt Supreme is very...affordable.
Talk to me!
Thanks!!!
2317/5000

#72 mart242

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Posted 15 August 2005 - 09:05 PM

I have the delonghi ICK8500. Bought it at the end of last year, made ~10 - 15 batches of ice cream / sorbet since then. Highly recommended, no problems with it beside a slightly noisy motor that mixes the ingredients. Easy to clean.

#73 scordelia

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 07:09 AM

I have a Cusinart and I think it works pretty well. And I got it for fifty bucks, with a second cannister thrown in, so I can make multiple 'screams at will.

View Post


busboy,
is this the dual canister cuisinart that you later referred to, or a single canister model that they included a spare. if so, where did you get it? i'm on deadline and that sounds like jsut the thing.

View Post


It's the single canister with an extra bowl thrown in (busbay and I have had this discussion as we have the same machine). That's what I have--the Ice 120 with an extra bowl. It works great! Very easy clean up and very good good textured ice cream. Also, is not much bigger than a blender.

Lots of people sell them. I got mine on sale from Neiman Marcus. Cook's Cupboard carries it. I am sure that Wiiliams Sonoma has it. I would go one of those web sites that does price comparisons like bizrate and see who has the cheapest.
S. Cue


#74 R Washburn

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 07:44 AM

I was in a Williams Sonoma today and saw this CuisineArt ice cream machine with a built in freezer compressor for 249 bucks.Has anyone used it/bought it?
http://ww2.williams-...m...1|rshop/hme

What do you think?
The KA Pro Line looks great, it's built like a Taylor but this CuisineArt Supreme is very...affordable.
Talk to me!
Thanks!!!

View Post


I have had the Cuisinart supreme for almost a year now and I really like it. Very nice if you are interested in making icecream in 1 Qt. batches. The only downside is that it is rather noisy.

Edited by R Washburn, 16 August 2005 - 07:45 AM.


#75 tafkap4d

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Posted 17 August 2005 - 10:56 AM

I have the Cuisnart dual ice cream maker and while it is great it is a bear to store, clean and use. I wish I had purchased a smaller one. This one produces far more ice cream than three people can consume. If I were to do this over, I would definitely go smaller. :wink:
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#76 Mottmott

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Posted 17 August 2005 - 01:18 PM

I just borrowed a Krups freezer bowl and did a quick trial run with some juice.

Alas, it didn't come with instructions. I looked simple enough, though, so I decided to give it a go just with apple juice - no labor lost, eh? It froze the juice very quickly and the texture seems ok and it could be used without a stint in the freezer even though it is a bit loose.

But the bowl and paddle don't seem to seat well. The paddle didn't seem to scrape everything off the walls unless I held it in place amd a very icy film was left on the floor and walls when I scraped out the apple ice (which actually has a decent texture). Was I doing something wrong? Or is it just the nature of the beast? I assume that my result might have been different if I'd actually made an ice cream base with a lot of butterfat, but my first concern was to figure out how the machine works absent mfgr instructions.

I may I'll give it a try with waternelon tomorrow.
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#77 Mottmott

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Posted 17 August 2005 - 01:21 PM

I was in a Williams Sonoma today and saw this CuisineArt ice cream machine with a built in freezer compressor for 249 bucks.Has anyone used it/bought it?
http://ww2.williams-...m...1|rshop/hme

What do you think?
The KA Pro Line looks great, it's built like a Taylor but this CuisineArt Supreme is very...affordable.
Talk to me!
Thanks!!!

View Post


I have had the Cuisinart supreme for almost a year now and I really like it. Very nice if you are interested in making icecream in 1 Qt. batches. The only downside is that it is rather noisy.

View Post


When I get my own machine, I may go for one of these. I think I read upthread that some machines don't work well with smaller amounts. How does this one do?
"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

#78 tekna

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Posted 17 August 2005 - 02:48 PM

I just borrowed a Krups freezer bowl and did a quick trial run with some juice. 

Alas, it didn't come with instructions. I looked simple enough, though,  so I decided to give it a go just with apple juice - no labor lost, eh?  It froze the juice very quickly and the texture seems ok and it could be used without a stint in the freezer even though it is a bit loose.

But the bowl and paddle don't seem to seat well. The paddle didn't seem to scrape everything off the walls unless I held it in place amd a very icy film was left on the floor and walls when I scraped out the apple ice (which actually has a decent texture). Was I doing something wrong? Or is it just the nature of the beast? I assume that my result might have been different if I'd actually made an ice cream base with a lot of butterfat, but my first concern was to figure out how the machine works absent mfgr instructions.

I may I'll give it a try with waternelon tomorrow.

View Post


I have a Krups machine and it does that as well. And with ice cream, it seems that the fat gets pulled out of its emulsified state and sticks the walls of the bowl.

Has anybody else seen the fat separation problem in other machines where you need to pre-freeze the bowl? I'm wondering if it's because the bowl surface is so cold it pulls the fat since fat solidifies more quickly at 0 degrees F.

#79 kjohn

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Posted 17 August 2005 - 08:35 PM

A little off the beaten path, but my father makes killer ice cream with one of these:http://www.vitamix.com/

I use the Cuisinart and I've been very happy with it. I had a Krups, but the seal broke and the fluid inside started leaking out. I'm very interesting in that electric compressor machine that a number of people have pointed out in this thread. Perhaps the time has finally come for an affordable home version - I'd like to see (and taste) some test results though before I shell out for one. Perhaps they demo it at the Williams Sonoma?

#80 Mottmott

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 02:21 PM

I just borrowed a Krups freezer bowl and did a quick trial run with some juice. 

Alas, it didn't come with instructions. I looked simple enough, though,  so I decided to give it a go just with apple juice - no labor lost, eh?   It froze the juice very quickly and the texture seems ok and it could be used without a stint in the freezer even though it is a bit loose.

But the bowl and paddle don't seem to seat well. The paddle didn't seem to scrape everything off the walls unless I held it in place amd a very icy film was left on the floor and walls when I scraped out the apple ice (which actually has a decent texture). Was I doing something wrong? Or is it just the nature of the beast? I assume that my result might have been different if I'd actually made an ice cream base with a lot of butterfat, but my first concern was to figure out how the machine works absent mfgr instructions.

I may I'll give it a try with waternelon tomorrow.

View Post


I have a Krups machine and it does that as well. And with ice cream, it seems that the fat gets pulled out of its emulsified state and sticks the walls of the bowl.

Has anybody else seen the fat separation problem in other machines where you need to pre-freeze the bowl? I'm wondering if it's because the bowl surface is so cold it pulls the fat since fat solidifies more quickly at 0 degrees F.

View Post


It was a wonderful day, not hot and humid as most of the summer has been, so I thought I'd go for it and made a basic vanilla ice cream with creme anglaise base. I found I had to hold the machine steady so that the ice cream was scraped off the side. That didn't take care of the bottom, so I used a silicone spatula to scrape the bottom, which worked well enough that I wound up with a very acceptable vanilla ice cream.

I WOULD NOT buy the Krups because of all this fuss. I wonder if the Cuisinart works better than this.
"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

#81 star792

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Posted 19 August 2005 - 08:43 AM

i haven't seen the one i use on here so i thought i would put in my .02. i have a $20 hamilton beach model that i got from big lots and i use it all the time. i, of course, have never used a fancy machine so i can't compare but it really does make good ice cream. i was hesitant to spend a lot because i didn't know how much i would use it and thought my husband might not understand if i spent $50 on a machine.(we are a one income family-with small kids)
when mine breaks though i think i might go with the cuisinart, its probably more durable.
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#82 Sethro

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Posted 31 August 2005 - 03:25 PM

Well I killed my Krupps LeGlacier last month. Lets face it: Krupps is GARBAGE.
-8 hour pre-freeze time between each 1.5 pint batch
-paddle that doesn't even contact the walls or floor of the canister
-imposible to clean without icing over
-very hard to seal lid that is extremely easy to snap or crack
-shoddy freezing canister that is prone to leaking or bursting

If you are dead-set on the under $100 range, I would steer the hell clear of Krupps.


Anyways, I was hoping to gather some last minute advice before I go ahead and plunk down serious dough.

I've almost decided on the KitchenAid Pro ($1300), but one thing bothers me. The description cites the freeze time at "under 30 minutes", which seems ridiculous for a compressor of that size. Do you figure they are saying 30 minutes for the benefit of knuckleheads who plan on pouring hot base into the machine, or could it really be that slow to freeze a chilled base?

I've also done alot of research on the Musso Lussino($600), but I get the distinct impression that the compressor is under-powered and it is indeed very slow to freeze. Plus, I'm always weary of top-loaders knack for freezing a solid centimeter of base on the bottom surface.

The Cuisinart Supreme ($300) looks decent enough, but I haven't been able to gather many accounts of first-hand experience.

If I'm commting to the $1000+ range, are there other machines I should be looking at before the KA?

Thanks for any help, in advance.

Edited by Sethro, 31 August 2005 - 03:26 PM.


#83 tan319

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Posted 31 August 2005 - 07:58 PM

call up those KAPro people, tell them you're a serious pastry chef, and pose that same question to them.
Is it a safety measure for them, someone using it in a hot as hell place, pouring hot base in, etc.?
Good luck, sethro!
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#84 simdelish

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Posted 31 August 2005 - 08:27 PM

I've also done alot of research on the Musso Lussino($600), but I get the distinct impression that the compressor is under-powered and it is indeed very slow to freeze. Plus, I'm always weary of top-loaders knack for freezing a solid centimeter of base on the bottom surface.

View Post


I'm still using my Musso at work (or should I say my assistant is...). I am pretty impressed with it overall, I must say. I have never had a problem with the base having a frozen layer on the bottom. The dasher does a good job scraping the sides and bottom. If anything, I wish the blade went HIGHER, as the ice cream does pile up while its churning, because the top is convex and can accomodate it. But then again, I have a tendency to fill it as much as possible, because I seem to run it all day long, and am trying to get the most done as possible. :wacko:

As for freezing time, I only spin pre-chilled bases -- ones that I have made the day before to let the flavors develop more. My sorbets are spun as soon as they are made, but they are pretty darn cold because my syrup is cold, and I either use cold fruit, or barely thawed purees. Stuff freezes in about 30 minutes, but sometimes longer, as the kitchen is hot, or I have overfilled.

the only drawbacks I see are:
the small size (problematic for me)
not fast enough (for me) to freeze
no extraction process (I like to push a button and have the stuff extruded out a spout -- i don't have time to scoop out and handpack the ice cream)

I unfortunately, am used to a much bigger and more powerful machine, so that's why I complain. But really -- overall -- I think the Musso is impressive.
I like to cook with wine. Sometimes I even add it to the food.

#85 Sethro

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Posted 01 September 2005 - 01:34 PM

call up those KAPro people, tell them you're a serious pastry chef, and pose that same question to them.
Is it a safety measure for them, someone using it in a hot as hell place, pouring hot base in, etc.?
Good luck, sethro!

View Post


I did take your advice and call the customer service line. Its actually well-set up; I was directed to representatives that dealt with the pro-line frozen dessert maker specifically. Unfortunately, they were still unable to give me a satisfactory answer on run-times. What they did tell me is that the first batch does take over 20minutes, and subsequent batches take 10-15. They didn't seem too sure about that though. I wish I could get some advice from someone who actually uses one...

I'm still using my Musso at work (or should I say my assistant is...).  I am pretty impressed with it overall, I must say.  I have never had a problem with the base having a frozen layer on the bottom.  The dasher does a good job scraping the sides and bottom.  If anything, I wish the blade went HIGHER, as the ice cream does pile up while its churning, because the top is convex and can accomodate it.  But then again, I have a tendency to fill it as much as possible, because I seem to run it all day long, and am trying to get the most done as possible.  :wacko:

As for freezing time, I only spin pre-chilled bases -- ones that I have made the day before to let the flavors develop more.  My sorbets are spun as soon as they are made, but they are pretty darn cold because my syrup is cold, and I either use cold fruit, or barely thawed purees.  Stuff freezes in about 30 minutes, but sometimes longer, as the kitchen is hot, or I have overfilled.

the only drawbacks I see are:
the small size (problematic for me)
not fast enough (for me) to freeze
no extraction process (I like to push a button and have the stuff extruded out a spout -- i don't have time to scoop out and handpack the ice cream)

I unfortunately, am used to a much bigger and more powerful machine, so that's why I complain.  But really -- overall -- I think the Musso is impressive.

View Post


Speed is my concern, not because of time constraint but because of crystalization and over-churning. I want my ice creams spun in 8 minutes or less, and sorbets in 10. So it sounds like the Musso is not the machine for me.

#86 tan319

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Posted 01 September 2005 - 06:39 PM

Yeah, it would be nice to be able to talk to someone about how the KAPro works.
Two things come to mind...
Google for a customer site or something like that ( Yahoo?, places like that)
Or call the KA people back and see if they can put you in touch with any buyers, especially restaurant people, or if they know of any user groups.
If there's resistance, you can always tell them you're personally putting your cash on the line ( the impression I have?) so it's doubly important.

One thing I have to mention about how quickly your mix freezes.
When I used a Taylor the 1st batch always took longer then subsequent batches.
Maybe not 20 minutes but up to 12 for sure.
After that it was more like 8 to 10 except for chocolate, which always seemed to freeze faster, because of the fat I guess.
Over churning is going to be a case of trail and error, no matter what.
When I used a ColdElitte, it seemed to throw all of my "timings" off of mark.
It was very easy to go from "not quite ready" to "remelt and chill".
RE: Crystalization: Why would that be a problem?

You could always stabilize or if you get your baume or BRIX right you're going to be there, no problems.
My two cents...
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#87 joaquin

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Posted 03 September 2005 - 08:57 AM

To RedHermes who asked about the KitchenAide Attachment, I have tried it and rate is as okay but the recipes that come with the machine do not really fit the bowl...that is they make too much ice cream and overflow the bowl. Not really that serious a problem because you can eat the excess while the rest is freezing. But I would use recipes that call for less finished product.

Also I got it when it first came out and used a discount and free shipping coupon. :blink:

#88 Moopheus

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 05:52 PM

Well, I'm a bit peeved. My little Krups has started leaking stuff out of its seams. It's only two years old. So I guess I have to get a new machine. I think I may have to spring for a compressor machine this time. I think the leading contender right now is the Lello 4070, or maybe the Cuisinart. I would like to have the Musso, but I can't afford it.
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#89 eje

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 08:48 PM

The Lello Gelato 4070 has worked well for my home use so far. It's done a good job with everthing I've thrown at it, from rich custard based ice cream to sorbets.

Complaints:

The paddle and other parts are plastic and seem somewhat flimsy.

The bowl lid is attached to the motor arm with two screws. To clean the lid the screws must be removed with a screw driver.

The "ingredient chute" in the bowl lid is so small it is nearly useless for anything other than liquids.

Not really a complaint; but, it is pretty big and heavy. About 1.5 to 2 times the size of my electric rice cooker. Unless you have a lot of counter space and make ice cream frequently, it's probably not something you're going to leave sitting on the counter.

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#90 Sethro

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 09:25 AM

Amazon.com has the Kitchenaid Pro for $1199 now. Just an FYI.