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Sorbet: Tips, Techniques, Recipes


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251 replies to this topic

#241 Sethro

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Posted 24 March 2008 - 08:33 PM

How can I avoid watery flavor and gritty texture, without a slick, weird, off-tasting effect from too many stabilizers?

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Don't use too much stabilizer?

Make a "sorbet syrup" that's saturated with dry ingredient (glucose atomize, stabilizer, etc), then experiment with balancing that and simple or strong syrup with your puree, juice, etc. Its the simplest way to find the best results (unless you are provided a recipe that calls for the exact base you plan on using). Cremodan makes a perfectly reliable and easy to find "sorbet stabilizer", as far as that goes.

#242 tan319

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Posted 25 March 2008 - 10:31 PM

I rarely use stabilizers or sorbet syrups in my sorbets.
I seem to only use a sorbet syrups when I'm making something with no fiber like a root beer sorbet or a orange sorbrt.
As Seth mentions, Cremodan makes a sorbet stabilizer and most of the time they have a "table" of fruits and recipes too but, to ensure good results 98% of the time you need a sugar densimeter, which measures in Baume or a refractometer that as already stated measures in Brix.
With the densimeter, I always go for 18 to 20 on it and I always get a creamy texture and the sorbet holds up in restaurant conditions very well.
Good luck on this!
2317/5000

#243 Nathan Kurz

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Posted 12 May 2008 - 04:50 PM

There's a whole topic on making ice cream, but the more I find, the more the art of sorbet becomes something different. I'm searching for a silky, smooth, intense dessert, however unlike my silken ice creams, I dont have use of egg yolks, lecithin, etc.

Anyone have any tips/techniques?
Gelatine/Xanthan Gum?
Cooked sugars?

How can I avoid watery flavor and gritty texture, without a slick, weird, off-tasting effect from too many stabilizers?

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I've mostly been making Pacojet sorbets recently (http://screamsorbet.com), but I have a few techniques that I think should work with standard methods as well. I haven't liked taste or texture of results with Xanthan or Guar gums (or products that use them like Cremodan), but I've had good results with Gelatin, Gellan, and Pectin.

I'd recommend starting with Pectin. You probably want an Amidated Citrus Pectin, also known as Pectin NH. I've tried several, and would recommend the CuisineTech Thermoreversible Citrus Pectin (http://thechefshack....ducts/tech.html).

I'll try to do a full writeup at some point, but the quick instructions are to mix 1 part of pectin to 4 parts of fine granulated sugar, and then sift into 15 parts of cool water while stirring. Bring to ~95C (just starting to boil), then blitz with an immersion blender. This makes a 5% 27.5 Brix pectin solution. While still hot (~70C) add this concentrated pectin to your room temperature or warmer pre-sweetened sorbet base while blitzing. If you add .175 of this solution by base weight, this should give you a .75% final pectin.

Gelatin also works well, but depending on who you are serving to you might not want add an animal product to an otherwise vegan dessert. Gellan works great with Pacojets, but I'm guessing that the more rigid gel might not come out as well with standard methods.
And as Tan319 says, you might not need stabilizers if you are using a lot of high pectin fruit solids.

Good luck with your experimentation!

#244 stscam

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 12:31 PM

SUGAR-FREE SORBET? Help!

We have a customer who would like us to make a trio of sugar-free sorbets. Splenda is not allowed. But stevia, agave, palm sugar, or other more natural sweeteners are okay. Has anyone done this successfully? I thought I'd ask before plunging in head first and eyes closed.

Cheers,

Steve
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#245 Josho

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 01:03 PM

SUGAR-FREE SORBET? Help!

We have a customer who would like us to make a trio of sugar-free sorbets. Splenda is not allowed.  But stevia, agave, palm sugar, or other more natural sweeteners are okay. Has anyone done this successfully? I thought I'd ask before plunging in head first and eyes closed.

Cheers,

Steve

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I would not recommend stevia as it adds a distinct grassy flavor that would be out of place in most sorbets (and, I think, is out of place in just about ANY dish). If you can use palm sugar, that's great and while it also has a flavor to it, it's not nearly as discordant as stevia's -- it's almost caramel-like. I'm surprised that palm sugar is okay but cane and beet sugar aren't, but if that's the case, that would be a good substitution.

--Josh

#246 stscam

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 02:46 PM

SUGAR-FREE SORBET? Help!

We have a customer who would like us to make a trio of sugar-free sorbets. Splenda is not allowed.  But stevia, agave, palm sugar, or other more natural sweeteners are okay. Has anyone done this successfully? I thought I'd ask before plunging in head first and eyes closed.

Steve

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We tried palm sugar. The simple syrup was about 30 Brix. For fruit we used some sour cherry puree we made up from last year's cherry crop (our area is famous for its cherries).

The result was a pretty creamy sorbet with a pronounced caramel-y flavor. The cherry fruit by itself cannot compete with the palm sugar. Perhaps something like raspberry might, but our customer wants mango and lemon too, and those are pretty mild flavors.

Back to the workbench.

Cheers,

Steve
Steve Smith
Glacier Country

#247 CSY

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 11:22 PM

hi Steve,

Liquid nitrogen maybe? Or is that not practical...

#248 tan319

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Posted 19 June 2008 - 05:24 AM

hi Steve,

Liquid nitrogen maybe? Or is that not practical...

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The deposit on a tank would seem a bit impractical??? :unsure:
2317/5000

#249 CSY

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Posted 19 June 2008 - 08:53 AM

hi Steve,

Liquid nitrogen maybe? Or is that not practical...

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The deposit on a tank would seem a bit impractical??? :unsure:

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hi tan319,

I know. I just can't get it off my mind(b/c of the many diff. flavors you could creat w/ LN). But somehow intimidated by the safety issues.

If, Steve could get a uni lab to agree to produce in their lab, then shift the product back to shop...what do you think?

#250 tan319

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Posted 19 June 2008 - 09:15 AM

I'm not sure that LN is more dangerous then 375f oil but...
The purity of flavour with it would surely wow the guests.
A thought I just had is Isomalt.
Diabetics can have that.
Mixed with water it could be used just like simple syrup, I believe?
Check it out.
2317/5000

#251 ejw50

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Posted 19 June 2008 - 06:38 PM

SUGAR-FREE SORBET? Help!

We have a customer who would like us to make a trio of sugar-free sorbets. Splenda is not allowed.  But stevia, agave, palm sugar, or other more natural sweeteners are okay. Has anyone done this successfully? I thought I'd ask before plunging in head first and eyes closed.

Cheers,

Steve

View Post


I would not recommend stevia as it adds a distinct grassy flavor that would be out of place in most sorbets (and, I think, is out of place in just about ANY dish). If you can use palm sugar, that's great and while it also has a flavor to it, it's not nearly as discordant as stevia's -- it's almost caramel-like. I'm surprised that palm sugar is okay but cane and beet sugar aren't, but if that's the case, that would be a good substitution.

--Josh

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Well stevia might be OK if you are making Vernors sorbet or root beer sorbet or something like that. Vernors is a type of ginger ale sold in Michigan.

Though, isn't it illegal to use stevia?

#252 Josho

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 08:17 PM

Well stevia might be OK if you are making Vernors sorbet or root beer sorbet or something like that.  Vernors is a type of ginger ale sold in Michigan.

Though, isn't it illegal to use stevia?

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...or semi-savory sorbets like basil or wasabi...

I hadn't heard that it was illegal to use stevia. We have a health food store (well, HAD, it closed a few months ago) that had a variety of stevia sweeteners. I'd be surprised if they were selling something illegal out on the shelves like that. But I'll ask at the co-op next time I'm there -- they'll know.

--Josh