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How to get grease marks off outside of pan?


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17 replies to this topic

#1 ip

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Posted 31 December 2001 - 09:42 AM

I have a set up Demeyere cookware and some hot oil spilled out of the skillet onto the outside of the pan. The oil stains don't come off, even with the Demeyere cleaner that has worked great in the past.

I uploaded a picture of it in case that helps.
http://www.magicalch...uploads/pan.jpg

Anyone know if Demeyere has a good reputation (it was a very expensive set)? I tried emailing the company and I'm waiting for a reply.

Thanks for any help.


#2 Fat Guy

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Posted 31 December 2001 - 10:23 AM

It's an excellent company, and those stains should come right out with regular detergent and a stainless steel scrubber, like this:

Posted Image

Let us know if that doesn't work. There are more aggressive solutions available too.


#3 ip

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Posted 31 December 2001 - 11:32 AM

Thanks, I'll give it a try. After re-reading my post, I'm not sure how you understood what language I was speaking, though! ;)



#4 Fat Guy

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Posted 31 December 2001 - 12:40 PM

You can also try Orange Glo Power Paste, as seen on TV! :)

#5 tommy

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Posted 01 January 2002 - 05:55 PM

i took fat guy's advice and searched out these little scourers.  they work like a charm.  i actually found them at a King's supermarket.  2 for 2.50 or something silly.  the brand was o cedar.  they have a website, but it doesn't seem to include these scourers.

thanks!  and my pots thank you.


#6 Fat Guy

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Posted 01 January 2002 - 07:07 PM

The only thing I'd add about those scourers is that you need to be sure only to use them on stainless or cast-iron pots. If you use them on aluminum or non-stick, forget about it. Don't use them on your dishes, counters, or anything like that. They will rip pretty much anything but stainless or cast-iron to shreds. That's why you rarely hear anybody recommending them, even though they work so well.

#7 Peter B Wolf

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Posted 01 January 2002 - 07:45 PM

Steven, I agree with those pads ripping everything into shreds, but ... and here is the "but":
If you use the ones AMWAY distributors sell, you will have superior product, hardly shredding and most of all not "really scratching" your utensils. I have used on good china. (Did not let my wife see it while using)

#8 Fat Guy

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Posted 02 January 2002 - 10:54 PM

I'm completely unfamiliar with the whole Amway phenomenon. How do I obtain one of these items? The Web site is quite cryptic.

#9 Peter B Wolf

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Posted 03 January 2002 - 07:57 PM

Steven. And a phenomenom it is, but keep your ears open when with the ladies. There has to be someone in your circle of friends who knows about it, or better yet, is a distributor (or knows one). Could send an email to their contact site, asking for one nearby. My wife swears by their products, qualitatively and economically. Sample is shaving cream, a can lasts me six months. Do you need to change threads?

#10 Fat Guy

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Posted 03 January 2002 - 08:19 PM

I have so few friends, I can say with a high degree of certainty there are no Amway distributors among them. I think it's not really a Manhattan thing. But I want to learn more, that's for sure, because my shaving cream budget is way out of line.

#11 project

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Posted 05 January 2002 - 04:57 AM

YES, grease on the outside of a pot, frying pan, or
roasting pan is a good candidate for some of the
toughest nonmetallic stuff around!

The time I wanted to get that stuff off the outside
of an aluminum deep fat fryer, I used something
abrasive enough to leave lots of scratches in the
aluminum.

Often wondered what solvent would work.

Tried the usual ones, acetone, rubber cement
thinner, and some others, and didn't get anywhere.
The stuff's TOUGH!

As I recall, long the standard ingredient in paint
remover was methyl chloride.  Hmm?

So, typing "methyl chloride" into Google and taking
the first hit at

http://www.who.int/pcs/cicad/summaries/cicad_28.html

see some really tasty remarks such as

"Methyl chloride is clearly genotoxic in in vitro
systems in both bacteria and mammalian cells.
Although the positive effects seen in a dominant
lethal test most likely were cytotoxic rather than
genotoxic, methyl chloride might be considered a
very weak mutagen in vivo based on some evidence of
DNA -- protein cross-linking at higher doses.

Testicular lesions and epididymal granulomas
followed by reduced sperm quality lead to reduced
fertility in rats at 980 mg/m3 (475 ppm) and to
complete infertility at higher doses.

Methyl chloride induced heart defects in mouse
fetuses when dams were exposed to 1032 mg/m3 (500
ppm) during the gestation period.

Effects on humans, especially on the central nervous
system, can be clearly seen after accidental
inhalation exposure.  In short-term exposure of
volunteers to methyl chloride, no significant
effects were seen that could be attributed to the
exposure.  There are insufficient epidemiological
data available to assess the risk for humans to
develop cancer as a result of methyl chloride
exposure."

So, better use it outdoors, when no one from the EPA
or NYT is watching, and use rubber gloves, a
chemical suit, and a breathing apparatus.  And, on
what to do with the rinse water, can't say!

Seems a lot just to wash a pot.

There has to be a better way.


#12 tommy

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Posted 05 January 2002 - 07:49 AM

the scourer i used did in fact seem to scratch the surface of the outside of my pan slightly.  

the all-clad website recommends a product called bar keeper's friend.  i may give this stuff a shot, as it might keep my pots prettier.  and as you know, everyone likes pretty pot.


#13 mamster

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Posted 05 January 2002 - 09:17 AM

Like everything in life, tommy, it's a compromise.  BKF is less harsh but also less, um, scrapy than a scouring pad.  So try BKF first and if you're not getting anywhere by the time your hand curls into a claw from excessive scrubbing, switch to the steel.

#14 Margaret Pilgrim

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Posted 07 January 2002 - 03:08 PM

The way professionals (dealers in antique and retro copper, enamel, etc. cookware) remove burnt on grease is oven cleaner.  You CANNOT use it on aluminum or bare cast iron, but it is the method least abrasive to a polished stainless, copper or enamelled pan.  It is essential that you follow the instruction on the can to the letter, both in regards to ventilation, gloves, etc, and regarding the surfaces on which it can be used.

I have used it on le Creuset, Desco, allclad, hammered copper, antique "graniteware" enamel bakeware with glowing results.


#15 ip

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Posted 10 January 2002 - 07:16 AM

I just want to say thanks to everyone who responded. I couldn't easily find the scourer so I tried the BarKeeper's Friend alone with paper towels and it worked. It took some scrubbing but the stains are just about gone. I got a reply back from Demeyere that basically said that the stains occured due to overheating the skillet and they recommended using acetone while also saying that it will take a long time to remove. I used BKF instead so I'm not sure if the acetone works too.

Cheers! :)


#16 Niall

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Posted 14 January 2002 - 05:40 PM

When I've got difficult stuff to clean I use fine steel wool pads that are called "Brillo" in the UK and Steelo in Oz. The wool is pretty fine, and is good on steel & cast Iron, but should not be used on non-stick or enamel. I don't have any aluminium pots so I don't know about that. Can't find a product website though..

#17 Mottmott

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Posted 16 May 2007 - 06:45 PM

When I've got difficult stuff to clean I use fine steel wool pads that are called "Brillo" in the UK and Steelo in Oz. The wool is pretty fine, and is good on steel & cast Iron, but should not be used on non-stick or enamel. I don't have any aluminium pots so I don't know about that. Can't find a product website though..

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You can find packets of steel wool in several grades of fineness in most hardware, paint stores or lumber yards. One used to be able to get it in the grocery store as a Brillo/SOS package with a bar of soap to use with it, but now they saturate the pads with soap and they don't work nearly so well.

They work well in conjunction with the powders.

And they work work on aluminum, too.
"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

#18 Jmahl

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Posted 16 May 2007 - 06:58 PM

I just did all the pots and pans that I have using oven cleaner. If stainless steel works like a charm. If aluminum clad have to finish with some fine grit waterproof wet sandpaper. Then they come out like new. By the way I got some spray on a All-Clad pan with a black finish. Completely messed up the finish. I am tempted in removing it completely. Go-know.

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