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Pizzelle Pointers


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5 replies to this topic

#1 Lisa1349

Lisa1349
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Posted 08 February 2004 - 10:14 AM

Hi Everybody,

A few weeks ago a friend asked me to make pizzelles for him. Being that I bought the iron 4 years ago and used it just as many times, I was excited.

In the beginning, I used the recipe that came with the Salton Pizzelle Master that I was using. I since lost the paper, i used Classic recipe #1. The first time I made them incorrectly accoring to the recipe and added the butter last. They were wonderful, however,very flaky and crisp with high butter flavor. The second time I followed the redipe exactly, and added the butter before the flour. There were much firmer and solid, not flaky-crisp.

I hypothesize that the first time, I was coating the flour with fat creating enjoyable crispness and the second time, the flour absorbed all the moisture and I made little fried breads.

So, what techniques do the rest of the eGulleters employ, and to what successes?

Thanks
Lisa K
Lavender Sky

"No one wants black olives, sliced 2 years ago, on a sandwich, you savages!" - Jim Norton, referring to the Subway chain.

#2 marthapook

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Posted 08 February 2004 - 10:25 AM

I can't even give approximates on the recipe i use because i eye everything the way Nonna does it and when it looks (and tastes) right I go.

The one thing I'd like to add is that I've used the electric irons and not had good results. ITS NOT THE SAME.

I can only turn them out right if I use the hand made iron my Zio Levino forged in Argentina in 1976.

PS - never, ever try it on an electric burner - as I found out the hard way when I was newly married, homesick and living in a god forsaken place that had an electric stove :angry: - nasty.

#3 I82Much

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Posted 04 June 2004 - 08:12 PM

This is my aunt's recipe, I helped her prepare them at Christmas and they were oh so good.

Beat well: 6 eggs
1 1/2 cups sugar

Add: 1 cup melted margarine/butter
2 cups flour
2 tsp vanilla
1 oz anise (she threw in the whole 2 oz bottle)
pinch of salt
Let rest for 1 hour

#4 JanKK

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Posted 04 June 2004 - 08:38 PM

The recipe I have always used in almost identical to your "classic recipe 1" , including the mixing instructions, except that it has 4 tsp baking powder instead of 2. I use an electric pizelle maker. Never had a problem and they're always very good! (At least IMHO!! ;)

#5 Java-Joe

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Posted 05 June 2004 - 09:56 PM

Boy, I feel silly asking this question, but is the cookie produced with these recipes the same as the stroopwafel?
I enjoyed reading the stroopwafel thread recently on this board. I checked out all the pizelle makers on eBay. Wow!
Anyway........just curious
Joe
You gonna eat that?

#6 Lisa1349

Lisa1349
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Posted 06 June 2004 - 08:51 PM

The stroopwaffles I've had (that we sell) are a bit crunchier, not as crumbly as a pizzelle. The cookie must be sturdy to hold up to the tasty filling. I shall do a side by side comparison.
Lisa K
Lavender Sky

"No one wants black olives, sliced 2 years ago, on a sandwich, you savages!" - Jim Norton, referring to the Subway chain.