Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the society.

Photo

Opened and Closed


  • Please log in to reply
54 replies to this topic

#1 kaukaulesa

kaukaulesa
  • participating member
  • 46 posts

Posted 06 February 2004 - 11:42 AM

Hey,
If you spot a new place in your neighborhood or areas you frequent, tell us about it here. And if you notice a favorite spot of yours has closed, report it.

I was really bummed when I went to Kekaulike Coffee Shop yesterday and found out it had new owners, switching from healthy-oriented cheapo plates, specializing in Puerto Rican pasteles, to a run-of-the-mill plate lunch place. Wah! So in case you liked it as a funky, budget spot for good food, it is no longer.

#2 skchai

skchai
  • participating member
  • 1,038 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawai`i

Posted 07 February 2004 - 06:17 PM

Some places that closed in 2003:

Shishido Manju in Wailuku

Shishido Manju (another story)

Washington Saimin in Makiki

Beau Soleil in Manoa

Mongolian Bar-B-Q in Kaimuki

Jaja in Palama

Both Shishido Manju and Washington Saimin had been at their respective locations for over a generation. Shishido Manju was one of the most popular omiyage that people brought home from Maui. As Irwin noted in another thread, Washington Saimin was the prototype that McDonald's tried to imitate when it first introduced Saimin to their own menu.

Beau Soleil, Mongolian Bar-B-Q, amd Jaja were not quite as prominent or established, but all had their loyal customers and filled niches in the eating environment that really aren't served very well by other restaurants, so they will be missed.

RIP.

Sun-Ki Chai
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sunki/

Former Hawaii Forum Host


#3 kaukaulesa

kaukaulesa
  • participating member
  • 46 posts

Posted 13 February 2004 - 11:55 AM

Thanks for that update Sun-Ki.

Here's a brand new place: Japan's oldest bakery has its newest location in Kahala Mall. I haven't checked it out yet, but apparently Japanese expats are crowding it to get their signature item, the name of which escapes me.

#4 skchai

skchai
  • participating member
  • 1,038 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawai`i

Posted 13 February 2004 - 10:22 PM

That would be Ginza Kimuraya. Their founder, Yasubei Kimura, and his son, Eizaburo, are generally credited with inventing the most common Western-Japanese pastry, the "anpan" (baked wheat bun stuffed with sweetened azuki beans). As you mentioned, they are oldest Western bakery in Japan that is still in business.

Sun-Ki Chai
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sunki/

Former Hawaii Forum Host


#5 skchai

skchai
  • participating member
  • 1,038 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawai`i

Posted 13 February 2004 - 10:41 PM

BTW, those links were for its group head office. The Ginza bakery page is here.

Here's a good English-language description of Kimuraya's history from the Wabi and Sabi st. Ginza Guide.

Sun-Ki Chai
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sunki/

Former Hawaii Forum Host


#6 skchai

skchai
  • participating member
  • 1,038 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawai`i

Posted 13 February 2004 - 10:55 PM

Here's another historical description of anpan. I know, I know, enough already!

Sun-Ki Chai
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sunki/

Former Hawaii Forum Host


#7 rlivings

rlivings
  • participating member
  • 52 posts

Posted 14 February 2004 - 09:26 AM

chunky's drive inn was a great place to buy a big bag of fries for a cheap price ahh the hana bada days.

#8 skchai

skchai
  • participating member
  • 1,038 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawai`i

Posted 15 February 2004 - 02:21 AM

Chunky's - yeah - I think that closed about 15 years ago! It was across from old Honolulu Stadium on Isenberg - where First Hawaiian Bank is now (?)

Sun-Ki Chai
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sunki/

Former Hawaii Forum Host


#9 skchai

skchai
  • participating member
  • 1,038 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawai`i

Posted 18 February 2004 - 01:46 PM

Here's a short article on the Kimuraya opening (second blurb):

QUICK BITES. by Wanda A. Adams

Sun-Ki Chai
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sunki/

Former Hawaii Forum Host


#10 rlivings

rlivings
  • participating member
  • 52 posts

Posted 18 February 2004 - 07:42 PM

Chunky's - yeah - I think that closed about 15 years ago! It was across from old Honolulu Stadium on Isenberg - where First Hawaiian Bank is now (?)

yup thats right skchai.

#11 stinkinbadges

stinkinbadges
  • participating member
  • 8 posts

Posted 08 March 2004 - 10:43 AM

Ting Yin Chop Suey on King St. I think it was the oldest Chinese restaurant in Hawaii. Closed last year, I think. Did it Move? They had the greatest, cheapest, small combo lunch in town. $3.75.

#12 kaukaulesa

kaukaulesa
  • participating member
  • 46 posts

Posted 08 March 2004 - 11:01 AM

Ah Chunky's. Why did you have to bring them up? I miss it every time I drive by that big ugly bank. When I used to come home to visit, sometimes I'd make my Mom stop their on the way home, for one of their cheeseburgers and an orange freeze. The burgers were disgusting...premade paper-thin patties, but it was that puke-green special sauce that did it for me. It was junk-food perfection.

Thanks for the info on the Chinese restaurant...another late-great landmark gone by the wayside.

New spot opened in Hawaii Kai (at the shopping center with Safeway): BluWater Grill. Owned and run by some Ryan's veterans. It opens today. Yes, there are kalua pig tostadas on the menu. You get the HRC drift. heh.

#13 skchai

skchai
  • participating member
  • 1,038 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawai`i

Posted 08 March 2004 - 02:11 PM

Aloha and welcome, stinkinbadges.

Tried to look up info on the whereabouts of Ting Yin, but they still seem to be listed on all the restaurant websites as being located at 125 N. King. So presumably it all happened fairly recently - do you know about when they chosed down last year? Also, it seems that the owners were involved in a fairly complicated legal battle over leases and such, though it's hard to figure out exactly what was going down from the documents on the web.

Lesa, that puke-green sauce from Chunky's intrigues me. Presumably it was not made from real hanabatas (sorry)! What approximately was in the sauce?

BTW, checked out the new Panya at Ala Moana Center. Seems to have a pretty similar selection of baked items to the old one in the McCully Shopping Center, with their "Hokkaido Bread" being the feature item. Haven't tried their sit-down dining service, though. One "innovation" that might alienate some people is that you have to pay a surcharge if you take your baked goods into the indoor dining area, though you can take them to their four outside tables without paying extra.

Some newly-opened places that I've started separate threads on:

California Wok (in Ala Moana Center)

Choi's Garden Restaurant

Sun-Ki Chai
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sunki/

Former Hawaii Forum Host


#14 skchai

skchai
  • participating member
  • 1,038 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawai`i

Posted 10 March 2004 - 01:04 AM

Another sighting: Noticed a "coming soon" sign on Ke`eaumoku Street announcing the opening of the "Taishoken Ramen". Or, as former Japan forum host BON would call it, "Taishoken@Ke`eaumoku". Taishoken is the name of two of Tokyo's most famous ramen houses. But it remains to be seen if the one here is actually affiliated with either of the Tokyo ones, which curiously enough are not affiliated with one another. Or at least a faithful copy of one of them . . .

Sun-Ki Chai
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sunki/

Former Hawaii Forum Host


#15 ryanozawa

ryanozawa
  • participating member
  • 31 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, HI, USA

Posted 10 March 2004 - 09:08 PM

It was only last summer that my coworkers introduced me to Pasta Italia, an Italian restaurant run by a friend of theirs in Waikele. They made the absolute best calimari I have ever had, anywhere. I also learned that they served breakfast, something unusual for an Italian joint and therefore making it quite a Sunday morning gem.


Sadly, the owner shut its doors in January, to make way for a larger dining chain that shall not be named. I hope he gets the restauranteur bug again soon!

Old eateries that are now only fond memories are a very popular talkstory topic. This thread over at HawaiiStories from August 2002 names quite a few.
HawaiiThreads.com - Let's talk story!

#16 skchai

skchai
  • participating member
  • 1,038 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawai`i

Posted 11 March 2004 - 03:04 AM

Thanks for the HawaiiStories link, Ryan. Great discussion!

One thing I noticed was that several of the participants mentioned Chicken Alice, which has also been mentioned by a number of people on this forum (though not on this thread) as a someplace they really miss. Also noticed that a lot of people mentioned Farrell's which kind of surprised me - I was one of the few people who could ever finish a Farrell's Pig Trough but otherwise I don't really remember the ice cream being all that different. . .
Jolly Roger . . . I could go for a Porky Boy right now. . .

Sun-Ki Chai
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sunki/

Former Hawaii Forum Host


#17 wesza

wesza
  • participating member
  • 1,103 posts
  • Location:Seattle, Wa.

Posted 11 March 2004 - 03:20 PM

Somehow the places that I personally miss the most are:

Flamingo Restaurant on Ala Moana as that was where my family went to eat most often for the friendly fast service and the consistent quality with reasonable prices, especially with the set dinner menus.

Pearl City Tavern. There wasn't anyplace even close for that special occasion meal. With the Monkey Bar and upstairs Garden it was always very special. The fact that it was a substantial sized independent Restaurant located in Pearl City that served Live Maine Lobsters [I generally ordered 3 or 4 pounders] comparable to the best Lobster places on the mainland at reasonable prices was really awesome. The decoration and amenities always felt right.

Mahi-Mahi Sandwiches and good breakfasts were always available at the various "Stewart's Pharmacy Restaurants" for locals and tourists.

Too many places have closed that seemed to be just there that were special that I'm not sure of their names and maybe never even knew what they were called. It seems like there were many open window or storefronts that every one sort of took for granted especially in the Kaimuki and Kilihi areas or Bretania and King Streets that only prepared a few special items that were really good.

Irwin :unsure:
I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

#18 skchai

skchai
  • participating member
  • 1,038 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawai`i

Posted 11 March 2004 - 04:50 PM

Thanks wesza. . . . the Ala Moana Flamingo Chuckwagon and the Pearl City Tavern were both landmark places whose niche hasn't been filled (at least not by any locally-owned restaurants).

BTW, we were finally able to check out Mary Jane's Kitchen (aka Gohyangjip), based on kaukaulesa's fine review in last week's Honolulu Weekly. It was just as good as you mentioned - really unique among Korean restaurants here in its honest appreciation of regional specialties. Unlike other places, that generally focus on standardized Seoul-centered menu, Mary Jane's carries a lot of dishes from the Southwestern (Jeolla-do) region of Korea, that you can't get elsewhere.

Posted Image

Here's a sample of what we ate. Thanks, again kaukaulesa, for the great tip.

Sun-Ki Chai
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sunki/

Former Hawaii Forum Host


#19 wesza

wesza
  • participating member
  • 1,103 posts
  • Location:Seattle, Wa.

Posted 11 March 2004 - 08:49 PM

Sun-Ki:

The Flamingo Chuckwagon was located on Kapolani Boulevard across from the Blaisdall Center. Served "Prime Rib" Buffet at reasonable price.

The original "Flamingo Restaurant" was located on Ala Moana Blvd at the location where a Restaurant Center was built after they lost their lease. There was also a Waikiki Location for Years where the Waikiki Center[?] was built. They also built a place in Pearl City as did the Columbia Inn. Don't know if any still operating.

Irwin :unsure:
I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

#20 skchai

skchai
  • participating member
  • 1,038 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawai`i

Posted 12 March 2004 - 03:27 PM

Thanks, Irwin, for clearing up my confusion. As far as I know, the Kapiolani and Ward Flamingo Chuckwagon is still there - at least the sign is there when I pass them on the street. Columbia Inn still has its Kaimuki location operating, though under new ownership (not the Kaneshiro family).

Sun-Ki Chai
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sunki/

Former Hawaii Forum Host


#21 Tani

Tani
  • participating member
  • 12 posts

Posted 24 March 2004 - 03:40 PM

Columbia Inn still has its Kaimuki location operating, though under new ownership (not the Kaneshiro family).


My ears are burning. If any readers have stories about the old Columbia Inn (Kapiolani), I'd love to hear them. I'm Tosh Kaneshiro's granddaughter, but a katonk who was still pretty young when the place turned over to Kyotaru.

Of course my family tells me some stories, but I am always on the lookout for more!

#22 skchai

skchai
  • participating member
  • 1,038 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawai`i

Posted 24 March 2004 - 10:10 PM

Welcome to the Hawai`i forum, Tani! It's nice to have a member of the Kaneshiro `ohana taking part here.

Here's a canned history of the Columbia Inn - correct me if I get any facts wrong!

The original Columbia Inn was opened on Beretania St. in Chinatown by Gentaro Kaneshiro soon after the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, and was passed onto Frank and Fred "Tosh" Kaneshiro. After they were forced to give up their lease, they moved to the historic 645 Kapiolani Blvd. location in 1964. This was originally the location "Times Grill", owned by Albert and Wallace Teruya of Times Supermarket fame. Both the Kaneshiros and the Terukyas were descendents of immigrants from Oroku Aza in Okinawa! The Kaimuki branch was opened a several years later. . .

Here's some more stuff I wrote on another thread:

We all have great memories of the Columbia Inns. They were sold in the 1980s by the Kaneshiro family to Kyotaru Corp. of Japan, a restaurant chain, which turned the Waimalu branch into a Kyotaru restaurant. Frank and Tosh Kaneshiro have long since gone on to the great Dodger Stadium in the sky. Though ironically the Inns were doing great business-wise, Kyotaru itself was teetering near bankruptcy by the late 1990s and they were sold off again. A bunch of people tried to have the Kapiolani branch turned into a State landmark, but they failed in the end and it became a Servo Pacific auto showroom. Fortunately, the Kaimuki location was bought up the brothers Tri and Thanh Nguyen who have kept it alive - as far as I know it is still open and doing well.


When the Kapiolani location closed in 2001, they held a great farewell party in which Tosh's widow Bea and her children Eugene, Norman, and Dennis were there. They showed off the famous photo for one last time. The most precious ones centered around the "Round Table" where the regulars hung out. A lot of the photos featured the Los Angeles Dodgers, of which Tosh was perhaps Hawai`i's greatest fan. Wonder what ever happend to those photos?

If you're interested in researching more about the family history, you might try contacting the Hawai`i United Okinawan Associations, which has been instrumental in developing an "Okinawan Restaurant Project" and has featured information about Oroku Aza families many times in their newsletter.

Sun-Ki Chai
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sunki/

Former Hawaii Forum Host


#23 Tani

Tani
  • participating member
  • 12 posts

Posted 25 March 2004 - 11:18 AM

Wonder what ever happend to those photos?


Thanks for the welcome, skchai.

It is rumored that my Uncle Gene has many of the photos in boxes on his lanai, lest you think that isn't very secure, I tried to find them last time I was there, and failed completely as his lanai is jam packed full of stuff. The (in)famous Round Table itself is there, too. Also protected by fortresses of other stuff (others might say "junk" or worse). :biggrin:

#24 skchai

skchai
  • participating member
  • 1,038 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawai`i

Posted 26 March 2004 - 10:57 PM

I hope Uncle Gene knows that he's dealing with important historical artifacts!

Seriously, I'm sure a lot of people have great memories of a lot of those things. . .

Sun-Ki Chai
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sunki/

Former Hawaii Forum Host


#25 kaukaulesa

kaukaulesa
  • participating member
  • 46 posts

Posted 20 April 2004 - 02:58 AM

Another golden oldie closing: House of Hong. The Lewers Street restaurant closes its doors at the end of this month, although the bar is staying open.

#26 kaukaulesa

kaukaulesa
  • participating member
  • 46 posts

Posted 19 May 2004 - 11:33 AM

Worth checking out is the new Cuisine Okonomi Kai. (Reviewed in last week's Weekly.) V. cool space and good food.

Also went to Inamas Tei next to Puck's Alley for the first time. Amazing! If you can't afford Sasabune, the sushi there is a good lower-priced alternative. Classic edomaezushi in perfect bite-size pods as it should be. But as I left, i stuck my head into the place next door. So Japanese, stuff like "baked onigiri" (!) and "liver and leek" on the menu. I guess it's izakaya. the chef is from Tokyo, the owner from Kanagawa. It's called Kohnotori.

#27 ryanozawa

ryanozawa
  • participating member
  • 31 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, HI, USA

Posted 27 May 2004 - 01:10 AM

Whatever the name of the place was that followed in the space long held by King's Bakery on S. King Street in McCully? Well, it's something else now. Can't say I miss it, though... never went there. (I'm glad Jimbo's is still going strong.)

And Eastern Garden at the base of Waialae has been gone a while. I just noticed today that it's been replaced by a very new-agey, all-black Japanese eatery called "Momono" (or something similar).

Anyone know anything about either?
HawaiiThreads.com - Let's talk story!

#28 skchai

skchai
  • participating member
  • 1,038 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawai`i

Posted 27 May 2004 - 11:54 AM

You mean the place that's now Makino Chaya? I forget too; it must not have been that memorable. Wasn't it something that kept the "King's" name, like "King's Garden" or something like that? Or was that the iteration before that even?

Don't know much about Momomo I thought I came across the Eastern Garden website fairly recently, though. . . spooky.

Sun-Ki Chai
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sunki/

Former Hawaii Forum Host


#29 skchai

skchai
  • participating member
  • 1,038 posts
  • Location:Honolulu, Hawai`i

Posted 11 August 2004 - 09:39 PM

Opened - (actually 3 months ago, but I didn't find out until recently). Hawaii's first (it's about time) full-fledged Indian Market, called . . . India Market. It's on 2570 S. Beretania St. #105, Ph: 946-2020, in the same building as the Well Bento takeout, just off University Ave., across Beretania from Kinko's. Spices, naturally, dals, ghee, packaged chaat, tamarind, refrigerated burfi, all the things you would expect. Bollywood DVDs renting for $2.00 a night. Owners have been here for over 15 years - asked them why they decided to open - just frustrated that there wasn't already a place like this in Honolulu! Hope it will do well - have positioned themselves in a good location to attract a wide range of customers - right near health food stores.

Sun-Ki Chai
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sunki/

Former Hawaii Forum Host


#30 LarryG

LarryG
  • participating member
  • 34 posts

Posted 13 August 2004 - 11:45 AM

I'm not sure this qualifies as "opened" since it has been around a while, also it is only open on Saturday, but I find one of the best places to scarf breakfast on that day is at KCC. Tomorrow looks especially promising. Here's the short writeup I put on my blog, to save you the trouble of going over there:

------

Friday, August 13, 2004
Breakfast bliss alert -- I can't wait for Saturday

I hope the folks at the Saturday Market will be putting out extra tables this weekend. They're going to need them to accommodate the crowds lining up for breakfast.

The KCC Saturday Farmers' Market tip sheet has my mouth watering already. And it's unfair, too -- I'll have to choose one dish, but I want to try all three! From the tip sheet, describing breakfast to be prepared by Chef Jim Gillespie of Sunset Grill at Restaurant Row:


* Portuguese Sweetbread Monte Cristo (ham and cheese sandwich dipped in an island fresh egg batter and fried)
* Wild Salmon Hash on Dean's Greens with Tarragon Vinaigrette and Hauula Tomato Relish
* Roasted Eggplant, Island Vegetables and Goat Cheese in a Wrap

What to do?? Maybe try one and take another home for lunch.