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Hot Milk with Dulce de Leche


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#31 therdogg

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 09:34 AM

Would it be possible to pass along the microwave recipe? I was going to try the 4-hour stove method this weekend, but I'm in the middle of summer and am absolutely going to melt. Thanks...

Sure. Place the can of sweetened condensed milk in a large Pyrex container and microwave on 50% power for about four minutes, stirring halfway through. Then microwave on 30% power for 12-16 minutes, stirring every couple minutes (or more frequently if you need to) with a wire whisk until desired level of caramelization is reached.

#32 sandra

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 10:09 AM

In Mexican markets look for Coronado brand (or other Mexican brand) cajeta. That's the Mexican "dulce de leche." It's light years better than US products.

You can order it from
MexGrocer

It even comes in squeeze bottles which you can just hold over your ice cream, pound cake, apple slices, hot milk, etc.

Yes, cajeta is delicous, and there are several varieties of it, BUT it is an entirely different animal, it's made with goats milk - this is the big difference between it and dulce de leche.

So maybe goats milk not so good in cow milky tea or coffee....

Try both cajeta and dulce de leche rolloed up in crepes, or spread over a chocolate cake.... or spread on a chessmen cookie....

Dulce de leche ice cream in South America is not what you know from Hagen Dazs with the swirls of the stuff, it's even better, it's used in the base and it has a caramelly colour throughout....yum...
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#33 hillvalley

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 03:51 PM

Last night, while drinking my hot milk with DdL, it occured to me how great it would taste in iced tea. Sort of a fusion Thai tea.

Question: what's the difference between ducle de leche and sweetened condenced milk?
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#34 Jaymes

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 05:01 PM

Question: what's the difference between ducle de leche and sweetened condenced milk?

Dulce de leche, and cajeta, are caramelized versions of sweetened condensed milk.

#35 Jaymes

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 05:05 PM

In Mexican markets look for Coronado brand (or other Mexican brand) cajeta.  That's the Mexican "dulce de leche."  It's light years better than US products. 

You can order it from
MexGrocer

It even comes in squeeze bottles which you can just hold over your ice cream, pound cake, apple slices, hot milk, etc.

Yes, cajeta is delicous, and there are several varieties of it, BUT it is an entirely different animal, it's made with goats milk

Oh great. You just HAD to go and tell them.

Now they'll NEVER try it. :raz:

:laugh:

#36 GG Mora

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 05:11 PM

Question: what's the difference between ducle de leche and sweetened condenced milk?

Answer: Dulce de Leche is a thick, sweet, caramelized milk jam (Argentinian in origin) that's used for a variety of soul-soothing treatments. It's traditionally eaten spread on toast, or used as a filling for a cake, or as a sauce on desserts.

Sweetened condensed milk is milk that's been sweetened (WAY sweetened) and condensed (not quite sure how) to form a thick ivory goo that's used as an ingredient in all sorts of sweet stuff. You can cook SCM to make DdL (sort of) but the two aren't remotely interchangeable.

I'm in the process of experimenting with the cooked-SCM version of DdL & comparing it with the "real" thing made from raw milk, sugar and vanilla cooked for hours. I'll prepare a brief report with photos and, er, "tasting notes". Things aren't looking so good for the cooked-SCM version (sorry, kids).

#37 hillvalley

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 05:33 PM

Question: what's the difference between ducle de leche and sweetened condenced milk?

Dulce de leche, and cajeta, are caramelized versions of sweetened condensed milk.

*smacks self upside the head* duh

GG, scm is one of my ultimate comfort foods. I love drizzling it out of the can. I knew the two had to be related. Can't wait to try it on toast. :smile:
True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.
It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,
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#38 Jaymes

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 06:55 PM

Question: what's the difference between ducle de leche and sweetened condenced milk?

Dulce de leche, and cajeta, are caramelized versions of sweetened condensed milk.

*smacks self upside the head* duh

GG, scm is one of my ultimate comfort foods. I love drizzling it out of the can. I knew the two had to be related. Can't wait to try it on toast. :smile:

But remember, as is stated elsewhere on this thread, in the case of true dulce de leche and cajeta, the milk is condensed and sweetened and caramelized by the cook from scratch -- not just from the canned product with which we are all so familiar.

Edited by Jaymes, 09 February 2004 - 06:57 PM.


#39 fifi

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 07:06 PM

Now I am wondering how much of it in Mexico is still made "the old fashioned way" like GG Mora does? (I can't wait for her taste comparison.) I say that because I have had it all over the place in Mexico, a lot outside of tourist areas, and it all tasted the same to me. I have to believe that starting with milk and sugar it might turn out differently. I am beginning to think I may have never tasted it other than starting with SCM.

GG... Can you elaborate on your method? I can't get raw milk, though. Would that really make a difference? Is the vanilla added toward the end? I can't imagine it surviving the long cooking.
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#40 GG Mora

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 08:34 PM

Cher Fifi –

This recipe from Saveur is exactly the method I use. Whole milk from the grocery store works just fine. And the vanilla bean (or, should I say, the vanilla flavor) holds up just swell over the long cooking.

I recently found that the farm where I get my milk has a couple of Jersey girls mixed in the herd

Wow...I just got called away in the middle of this post. There's been a large owl around the property of late...my husband was out to empty the compost, and the owl was watching him from a nearby tree, so hub came in and called me up to see. There he was, about 20 feet up in a maple tree just on the edge of the dooryard: a Great Horned, I'm pretty sure. He waited just a moment and then took flight; had at least a 4-ft. wing span. Fucking awesome.

um...and the Jersey's are being milked into the bulk tank with all the Holsteins. Farm hand said he'd be happy to "bucket milk" the Jerseys for me, so I can get pure Jersey milk. ::dancing the Snoopy jig:: So, Jersey milk DdL, here I come (and butter and yogurt and CHEESE, if I dare).

Okay, here's the bad news. I've experimented with cooking Sweetened Condensed Milk to make Dulce de Leche, using the simmer-in-can method, the microwave method and, just for kicks, simmering it stovetop in a sauce pan. The brand I used was Carnation, so if there are differences between brands (which doesn't seem likely) perhaps I can blame the brand for my misfortune.

First, I simmered a can in a large pot of water for about 2 1/2 hours. Web research indicated that cooking for longer periods would produce a progressively thicker and, at 4 hours, nearly solid product. This is what the "Dulce de Leche" looked like after cooling slightly:
Posted Image

Next, on a whim, I just opened a can and dumped it in a sauce pan set over medium low heat. Before the contents even got hot enough to simmer, the bottom started to burn, but I persisted, stirring gently...until I just couldn't stand it any longer:
Posted Image

Then I tried therdogg's recipe for Dulce de Leche in the microwave:
Posted Image

I stopped before it got just too damned gritty.

It's quite possible that there's a learning curve here, but I've been cooking long enough to trust my instincts; I can't have gone that far wrong (can I have?). So, those of you that have made the SCM DdL, using whatever method, did yours look anything like any of my trials? Is it possible that a different brand of SCM would yield better results? I have to be careful here. My husband watched all of this and warned me I would probably be accused of rigging the trial, because this is what Dulce de Leche looks like when I make it (sorry about the fancy jar – that may be rigging enough):
Posted Image

I should mention that this one was snapped at room temperature. The others were all photographed when still warm enough to be uncomfortable at first bite.

As for taste, the actual flavor of the SCM versions (I only tried the simmered-in-can and microwaved versions; that other stuff the dog wouldn't even touch), it's close (ish) to the real thing, but only in that it has some milk flavor, some caramelization, and some sweet. But the SCM stuff has way too much sweet, sweet being the overriding presence. It has none of the depth, the richness, the (forgive me) complexity of the long-cooked DdL. And the texture is so far off...the simmered-in-can was like a chalky corn-starch pudding, the microwave version was offensively gritty, and the other stuff was like partially coagulated wallpaper paste.

This was, of course, an entirely unscientific trial, given my strong personal bias. And I'm open to suggestions for improving the quality of the SCM DdL – believe me, if I could get an equally good product with the minimal fuss involved, I'd be all over it.

I wish I could send you all a sample of the real stuff, or that you could find some in a jar close to home – you really don't know what you're missing.

#41 hillvalley

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Posted 15 February 2004 - 05:05 PM

Great post GG.

Now that I have a new love in my life, and I used up my virgin container, I am ready to committ to a larger size.

How long does this stuff last in the fridge?
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#42 GG Mora

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Posted 15 February 2004 - 05:28 PM

Hard to believe, but I've actually had a jar in the fridge for over a year (subsequent batches were so much better, this one's been sort of orphaned). Other than some crystalization of the sugars, it seems just fine...no mold, no slime. If I wanted to be compulsive, I could melt it down with a little water to get rid of the crystals but, to my mind, they just make it more interesting when sucking the DdL off my finger.

One of my husband's coworkers is an Argentinian woman & I got chatting with her about the DdL thing the other day. She said that when they made it at home, they would put glass marbles in it to keep it moving around the pan & prevent build-up along the bottom and sides. Very interesting. I'd be afraid of finding broken marbles in my otherwise lovely sauce. She's going to pass on her family recipe, along with a recipe for a special cake to be filled with DdL. I promise to share.

#43 GrizzyLemon

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Posted 15 February 2004 - 07:10 PM

A little side note, we Argentinians always laugh when we see the word 'cajeta' which to us is slang for female genitalia.

#44 Jaymes

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Posted 15 February 2004 - 08:43 PM

Now I am wondering how much of it in Mexico is still made "the old fashioned way" like GG  Mora does? (I can't wait for her taste comparison.) I say that because I have had it all over the place in Mexico, a lot outside of tourist areas, and it all tasted the same to me. I have to believe that starting with milk and sugar it might turn out differently. I am beginning to think I may have never tasted it other than starting with SCM.

Sweetened condensed milk is rather expensive to be a standard ingredient in restaurants, especially in so poor a country as Mexico. I would be quite surprised if any of the restaurants "outside of tourist areas" in which you have had dulce de leche used sweetened condensed milk to prepare it. I'm certain that they used milk (although perhaps evaporated milk) and sugar and vanilla.

One Mexican friend did give me a recipe that called for SCM as an ingredient. It was for a flan. My friend laughed about it. She said that it was "la favorita de nadie, pero..." In other words, it was nobody's favorite recipe for flan, but that it was quick and easy so they made it sometimes when they were in a hurry.

And the name for this SCM version? "Gringo Flan."

:laugh:

Edited by Jaymes, 15 February 2004 - 10:16 PM.


#45 hillvalley

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Posted 15 February 2004 - 08:53 PM

And a recipe?
True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.
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#46 Jaymes

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Posted 15 February 2004 - 09:07 PM

And a recipe?

Unfortunately, all my stuff is packed up in expectation of my upcoming move.

But I'm sure you can find lots of recipes for it if you google it. You make it in a blender. So just google sweetened condensed milk and flan and blender. Those recipes are all pretty much the same -- you caramelize sugar in your pan, and then in the blender combine milk or cream, eggs & egg yolks, vanilla, SCM, and sometimes other flavorings like orange or rum or Kahlua.

They're really pretty good. I made that type of flan for several years before I branched out into more complicated ones.

Edited by Jaymes, 16 February 2004 - 08:25 AM.


#47 sandra

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Posted 16 February 2004 - 03:21 AM

And a recipe?

Flan Napolitano

3/4 cup sugar
14 ounces canned sweetened condensed milk
1 cup whipping cream
1/2 cup milk
4 eggs
1 cinnamon stick

*Heat sugar in a 7 inch skillet over medium high heat. When the sugar begins to melt, reduce the heat to medium. Continue to cook sugar, stirring occasionally. When sugar is melted and browned, immediately spoon over the bottom and sides of a shallow 1 1/2 quart baking dish or mold. Set aside for caramel to cool.
*Preheat the oven to 325 F (165 C).
*Combine condensed milk, cream, milk and eggs in the blender. Process until thoroughly mixed. Pour into the baking dish lined with caramelized sugar. Drop the cinnamon stick into the middle of the mixture.
*Place the baking dish in a baking pan. Pour hot water into pan halfway up the sides of the baking dish.
*Bake about 1 hour 50 minutes or until a knife inserted off-center comes out clean.
*Cover flan loosely with foil if necessary to prevent excessive browning.
*Remove baking dish from the pan of hot water. Cool, then refrigerate at least 3 hours.
*To serve, run a knife around top edge and invert flan onto a serving plate.

Serve it with a BIG dollop of cajeta or dulce de leche on top....
www.nutropical.com
~Borojo~

#48 fifi

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Posted 16 February 2004 - 06:48 AM

Great trial GGMora.

Your simmered can looks like what I get. I do take mine a little longer and it gets a little darker but not much. The consistency is the same.

I had the same problem with the microwave method a few years ago. I haven't tried it since.

I don't think I would even attempt the saucepan method. Too much trouble.

Now to your wonderful stuff! That looks like an entirely different thing. Obviously it is darker and is more of a syrup. I have to say that I have never had anything like that either here or in Mexico. Some of what I have had in Mexico is more of the consistency as this one but lighter in color, about the same as the can, and tastes about the same as the can.

Guess what I am going to try next?
Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

#49 Jaymes

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Posted 16 February 2004 - 08:28 AM

And a recipe?

Flan Napolitano

Thanks, Sandra. And may I say that "Flan Napolitano" sounds sooooo much better than "Gringo Flan."

:biggrin:

#50 Jaymes

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Posted 16 February 2004 - 08:30 AM

A little side note, we Argentinians always laugh when we see the word 'cajeta' which to us is slang for female genitalia.

Well then, you must find it particularly amusing when we refer to "squeeze cajeta."

:laugh:

#51 sandra

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Posted 16 February 2004 - 08:34 AM

And a recipe?

Flan Napolitano

Thanks, Sandra. And may I say that "Flan Napolitano" sounds sooooo much better than "Gringo Flan."

:biggrin:

Ya, either way, it ain't too Mexican, eh?

I do make it though, I like the little holes it comes out with, like little nooks and crannies for the caramel...
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~Borojo~

#52 hillvalley

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Posted 11 March 2004 - 01:55 PM

I introduced my students to hot milk with Dulce de Leche today.

They absolutely loved it! We could only give them a small amount because we didn't have enough milk, but the little they got was inhaled. Most didn't want to try it because of the funky color, but with one sip they were hooked :smile:
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It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,
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#53 Suzanne F

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Posted 11 March 2004 - 04:42 PM

Answer to a question people asked way back:

I've had an open jar of DdL in my fridge for 2 1/2 years (well, it took a while until this thread came through) and it's fine. Like other preserved foods -- miso comes to mind -- as long as it doesn't get adulterated, it should last a long, long time.

And to a question no one has asked: if you just leave a can of SCM in the closet for a few years, it will eventually "madeirize" and while not be quite DdL, will take on a caramel color and flavor. Makes a pretty weird-looking Key lime pie, though.

#54 hillvalley

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Posted 24 March 2004 - 07:10 AM

Has anyone tried making DdL with the fat free sweetened condensed milk?
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#55 fifi

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Posted 24 March 2004 - 08:51 AM

Has anyone tried making DdL with the fat free sweetened condensed milk?

The horror! um... No.

As I think about it, though, it might work ok. The sugar carmelizes and the milk solids toast. The fat component doesn't change. There might be some textural differences but it should work. I say give it a try.
Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

#56 hillvalley

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Posted 24 March 2004 - 09:44 AM

Has anyone tried making DdL with the fat free sweetened condensed milk?

The horror! um... No.

As I think about it, though, it might work ok. The sugar carmelizes and the milk solids toast. The fat component doesn't change. There might be some textural differences but it should work. I say give it a try.

I agree that it is an abomination, but my coworkers are fat free crazy. I'll le tyou know how it turns out :smile:
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It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,
but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

#57 andiesenji

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Posted 06 February 2005 - 10:24 AM

There are several web sites that include the directions for simmering the unopened cans of sweetened condensed milk in a lot of water. That means you have to use a deep pot and put the can on a wire grid to hold it off the bottom of the pot and the can has to be covered by three times its depth by water, and it should be allowed to cool in the water, otherwise you can have an exploding can - the pressure in the can will cause it to split along a seam. I have seen this happen even in a pan of water but that contains the mess.

I have many recipes for dulce de leche, including one that uses half and half cows and goats milk and is very, very good, and is cooked in a crockpot with none of the inherent problems of stovetop cooking.
It is delicious and you would never guess it had goat milk in it.

I posted the recipe on another thread last year, sometime before the SoCal potluck.
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#58 kitwilliams

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Posted 06 February 2005 - 10:36 AM

Not to say any way is better than other, but I have had no problems, ever, with the following:

put can(s) of sweetened condensed milk in deep saucepan so that they are well covered with water. bring to boil, reduce to a simmer for two and a half hours, checking every so often to ensure cans are covered. With tongs, turn cans over and continue to simmer for another two and a half hours.

Done. Chill.
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#59 chefcyn

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Posted 06 February 2005 - 02:25 PM

Here is what I do...

Get several cans of sweetened condensed milk. Remove the labels and scrub off the remaining glue (so you don't muck up your pot). Put a dish towel in the bottom of a big pot and put the cans in. Cover with several inches of water and simmer covered for about 4 hours. The dish towel muffles the noise from the cans bumping around. The cover keeps the water level from dropping too much. Some folks are worried about the cans exploding but I have never had that happen in 25 years of doing it.

This is the method I'm familiar with as well (although the dish towel trick is nice!), and it works like a charm and virtually effortlessly. You'll have cans of Dulce de Leche to your heart's content this way. They even keep on the shelf unopened once they're cooked!

But it is CRITICALLY IMPORTANT to refrain from opening the cans until they are thoroughly cooled.

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Also critical to keep them covered with water the whole time.
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#60 tan319

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Posted 06 February 2005 - 05:26 PM

The simmer the can method is the best.
Used to do itt with Bain Maries, hotel pans, foil, blehhhh!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Started simmering those cans, life was brilliant .
I would simmer for around 4/5 hours, then leave over the pilots overnight to just get the color perfect.
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