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Hot Milk with Dulce de Leche


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61 replies to this topic

#1 GG Mora

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 02:16 PM

I made a big batch of DdL for Christmas gifting and still have several jars left. One of the gifties asked what to do with it, and I ran down the usual suspects: serve it warm over ice cream, eat it off a spoon, lick it off your finger and uh....that was about all I came up with. But then I got it in my head that it would be delicious stirred into hot milk – sort of like hot cocoa only different. So I tried it last night. Guess what? It's deadly good. I can't wait to try it blended with some cocoa, or with a little rum mixed in. The kids aren't getting anywhere near it.

#2 fifi

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 03:09 PM

*heel of hand smacking forehead*

Oh my! What a fabulous idea! I have a couple of cans left that I didn't give away. I can't wait to try this. i am also going to call the lucky recipients of my gift and suggest this. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.
Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

#3 KatieLoeb

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 04:16 PM

I made a big batch of DdL for Christmas gifting and still have several jars left. One of the gifties asked what to do with it, and I ran down the usual suspects: serve it warm over ice cream, eat it off a spoon, lick it off your finger and uh....that was about all I came up with. But then I got it in my head that it would be delicious stirred into hot milk – sort of like hot cocoa only different. So I tried it last night. Guess what? It's deadly good. I can't wait to try it blended with some cocoa, or with a little rum mixed in. The kids aren't getting anywhere near it.

*heel of hand smacking forehead*


Oh. My. God. I am so right there with you on this. This sounds too decadent for words.

Maybe like hot cocoa or hot dulce with a wee dram of your favorite winter Keep-Me-Warm spirit? Rum? Brandy? Bourbon?

Oooooohhhhh! I just got chills thinking about it... :biggrin:

Katie M. Loeb
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Cheers!
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Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol


#4 foodie52

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 04:17 PM

Yeah...I'm thinking that this may become my bedtime beverage , with a shot of Bailey's or Kahlua.

I'll get back to y'all in a few months when I am 10 pounds heavier!

#5 hillvalley

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 04:25 PM

This sounds heavenly and perfect for this crappy weather we're having.
Add a little Bailey's, some whipped cream.

yummmm
True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.
It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,
but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

#6 beans

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 04:43 PM

This sounds heavenly and perfect for this crappy weather we're having.
Add a little Bailey's, some whipped cream.

yummmm

I'll echo that.

Bad weather here too -- in fact frozen rain storm turning into snow tonight and tomorrow.

#7 fifi

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 04:54 PM

I am thinking a good dark rum. Any suggestions for this non-expert on rum?
Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

#8 SobaAddict70

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Posted 02 February 2004 - 04:56 PM

And try making it as a component for either a flan or a souffle.

If it's great with hot milk, it's even better as part of a custard. :biggrin:

Soba

#9 GG Mora

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 07:49 AM

And try making it as a component for either a flan or a souffle.

If it's great with hot milk, it's even better as part of a custard. :biggrin:

Soba

....as in the custard base for ice cream....

#10 Lady T

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 08:45 AM

:biggrin:

Damn all. This could make me look forward to getting up early in the dark.

:biggrin:
Me, I vote for the joyride every time.
-- 2/19/2004

#11 fifi

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 09:41 AM

My grandmother used to make me "white coffee" when I was little. This was milk diluted by about half with water with some added sugar. The diluted milk has a much different taste than heated whole milk. I just put some dulche de leche in that and it was absolutely WONDERFUL. Sort of a childhood flashback with an added layer of decadence.
Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

#12 bergerka

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 10:14 AM

I would just like you all to know that it is threads like this that have caused me to gain six pounds (that I am now desperately trying to lose) since my arrival at egullet. Damn you. DAMN YOU AND YOUR DULCE DE LECHE. :angry:

...where can I get some? :wub:

K
Basil endive parmesan shrimp live
Lobster hamster worchester muenster
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Gruyere cheese angelhair please
And a vichyssoise and a cabbage and a crawfish claws.
--"Johnny Saucep'n," by Moxy Früvous

#13 Lady T

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 12:36 PM

:wink:

Hispanic markets have it in jars. There's probably a recipe around here somewhere (Marlene? Is there? Hmmm?) for making it fresh from scratch.

:biggrin:
Me, I vote for the joyride every time.
-- 2/19/2004

#14 Ladybug

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 12:39 PM

We make these and call them steamers - basically hot milk, maybe a dollop of half and half, sugar and flavoring. Sometimes the flavoring has sugar in it (so obviously delete the sugar) like dulce de leche, plain old caramel syrup, chocolate syrup, etc. My recipe varies according to what we have on hand. I've made them for a long time for my youngest daughter who is small for her age. The doctors worried about her weight, so I was trying to fatten her up. These helped because at her age then (about a year old) she was much more inclined to drink than eat. She'll probably always be small, but I'm sure these helped her pack on a pound or two! My two older kids love them too but don't get them as often. I just tried a new one with milk, half and half and some of the syrup leftover from macerated strawberries. It makes those strawberry milk powders pale in comparison.

#15 GG Mora

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 01:42 PM

There's probably a recipe around here somewhere (Marlene?  Is there?  Hmmm?) for making it fresh from scratch.

The recipe I use was published in Saveur several years back. See here. I start with 3 gallons of milk, though, to ensure a plentiful supply of the end product. :biggrin: I only skim once. After making it several times and having to cook it much too much to get it thick enough, I determined that a traditional Argentine recipe is probably NOT best suited to Holstein milk (low protein). My guess is that a typical Argentine cow is of a breed that produces high-protein milk, and that multiple skimmings would be necessary to avoid making sludge. But over-skimming Holstein milk left it kinda wimpy. One skim delivered a perfect result.

#16 fifi

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 02:27 PM

Here is what I do...

Get several cans of sweetened condensed milk. Remove the labels and scrub off the remaining glue (so you don't muck up your pot). Put a dish towel in the bottom of a big pot and put the cans in. Cover with several inches of water and simmer covered for about 4 hours. The dish towel muffles the noise from the cans bumping around. The cover keeps the water level from dropping too much. Some folks are worried about the cans exploding but I have never had that happen in 25 years of doing it.
Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

#17 KatieLoeb

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 04:15 PM

Here is what I do...

Get several cans of sweetened condensed milk. Remove the labels and scrub off the remaining glue (so you don't muck up your pot). Put a dish towel in the bottom of a big pot and put the cans in. Cover with several inches of water and simmer covered for about 4 hours. The dish towel muffles the noise from the cans bumping around. The cover keeps the water level from dropping too much. Some folks are worried about the cans exploding but I have never had that happen in 25 years of doing it.

This is the method I'm familiar with as well (although the dish towel trick is nice!), and it works like a charm and virtually effortlessly. You'll have cans of Dulce de Leche to your heart's content this way. They even keep on the shelf unopened once they're cooked!

Katie M. Loeb
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Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol


#18 Jaymes

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 04:22 PM

In Mexican markets look for Coronado brand (or other Mexican brand) cajeta. That's the Mexican "dulce de leche." It's light years better than US products.

You can order it from
MexGrocer

It even comes in squeeze bottles which you can just hold over your ice cream, pound cake, apple slices, hot milk, etc.
"And you, you're just a stinker."

#19 Jaymes

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 04:26 PM

Here is what I do...

Get several cans of sweetened condensed milk. Remove the labels and scrub off the remaining glue (so you don't muck up your pot). Put a dish towel in the bottom of a big pot and put the cans in. Cover with several inches of water and simmer covered for about 4 hours. The dish towel muffles the noise from the cans bumping around. The cover keeps the water level from dropping too much. Some folks are worried about the cans exploding but I have never had that happen in 25 years of doing it.

This is the method I'm familiar with as well (although the dish towel trick is nice!), and it works like a charm and virtually effortlessly. You'll have cans of Dulce de Leche to your heart's content this way. They even keep on the shelf unopened once they're cooked!

But it is CRITICALLY IMPORTANT to refrain from opening the cans until they are thoroughly cooled.
"And you, you're just a stinker."

#20 fifi

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 05:08 PM

Good catch Jaymes. I always forget that when this comes up. And I am the safety freak. :blink:

I guess it just seems obvious to me. Duhhh. It isn't exactly all that obvious.
Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

#21 GG Mora

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 05:56 PM

Good catch Jaymes. I always forget that when this comes up. And I am the safety freak. :blink:

I guess it just seems obvious to me. Duhhh. It isn't exactly all that obvious.

I'm going to have to try the simmer-the-can method and do a side-by-side tasting with the long-suffering-all-day-burbling-sticky-mess version.

#22 KatieLoeb

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 07:10 PM

Good catch Jaymes. I always forget that when this comes up. And I am the safety freak. :blink:

I guess it just seems obvious to me. Duhhh. It isn't exactly all that obvious.

I'm going to have to try the simmer-the-can method and do a side-by-side tasting with the long-suffering-all-day-burbling-sticky-mess version.

Simmer-in-the-can is soooooo easy. And the results, in my experience, have always been excellent. I learned this trick from an Argentine chef that I used to work for. At the restaurant we used it as a dessert sauce, a plate decoration for desserts, swirled in ice cream (the BEST!), etc. Not a single guest ever complained that it didn't taste homemade.

Katie M. Loeb
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Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol


#23 SobaAddict70

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 07:14 PM

But it is CRITICALLY IMPORTANT to refrain from opening the cans until they are thoroughly cooled.

Oh yes. If you don't, it'll make Suzanne's adventure with oil look like a stroll in the park on Sunday. :biggrin: :blink: :biggrin:

Soba

#24 fifi

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 07:24 PM

I just drizzled a little bit over buttered baked sweet potato. :biggrin:
Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

#25 KatieLoeb

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Posted 03 February 2004 - 07:48 PM

I just drizzled a little bit over buttered baked sweet potato. :biggrin:

Holy Mother of God! You're EVIL!!! :wub: :wub:

Katie M. Loeb
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Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol


#26 therdogg

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Posted 05 February 2004 - 01:30 PM

[quote name='KatieLoeb' date='Feb 3 2004, 07:10 PM'] [quote name='GG Mora' date='Feb 3 2004, 07:56 PM'] [quote name='fifi' date='Feb 3 2004, 07:08 PM']
I'm going to have to try the simmer-the-can method and do a side-by-side tasting with the long-suffering-all-day-burbling-sticky-mess version. [/QUOTE]
Simmer-in-the-can is soooooo easy. And the results, in my experience, have always been excellent. I learned this trick from an Argentine chef that I used to work for. At the restaurant we used it as a dessert sauce, a plate decoration for desserts, swirled in ice cream (the BEST!), etc. Not a single guest ever complained that it didn't taste homemade. [/quote]
So I decided to try this since I have a can of Carnation scm here- then I noticed that the can says "do not heat in can." So I called up the folks at Carnation, wondering if they'd actually had any lawsuits over explosions. The guy said he can't go into it for legal reasons, but then also mentioned that you can make dulce de leche in the microwave. He emailed directions. It takes all of 16-20 minutes using the can of milk and a Pyrex container, and it won't heat your whole kitchen like having the stove on for four hours will (in summer that might be a big plus). So I gave it a whirl- not so bad. I added some to hot milk, which was quite delicious. Inspired, I then added a square of Lindt bitterweet chocolate as well. It was a bit too much like drinking a melted candy bar for my taste, but it might appeal to somebody else.

#27 LittleMissCrepe

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Posted 07 February 2004 - 09:55 AM

Would it be possible to pass along the microwave recipe? I was going to try the 4-hour stove method this weekend, but I'm in the middle of summer and am absolutely going to melt. Thanks...

#28 Suzanne F

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Posted 08 February 2004 - 10:05 AM

Tried the ddl in hot skim milk last night: YES!!

And it works very well in a cafe con leche, heated/melted into the milk in the microwave.

When I use up the jar, I'll probably make more with the ancient cans of scm in the closet. Which, by the way, start to caramelize on their own after a few years (I've made some pretty weird-looking key lime pies).

#29 lia

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Posted 08 February 2004 - 06:11 PM

tried it with diluted 1% milk and an argentinian brand jarred dulce de leche. After it cooled a bit, tasted exactly like Sugar Babies.

#30 hillvalley

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Posted 08 February 2004 - 06:23 PM

tried it with diluted 1% milk and an argentinian brand jarred dulce de leche. After it cooled a bit, tasted exactly like Sugar Babies.

Drinking that as we speak. I have a new favorite winter drink :wub:

Now all we need is some snow
True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.
It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,
but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe