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Gyoza

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60 replies to this topic

#31 torakris

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Posted 09 February 2005 - 04:23 PM

I love those bite sized gyoza, they look something like this

I have seen them called hitokuchi gyoza (一口餃子) one bite gyoza
otsumami gyoza (おつまみ餃子) snack gyoza
and Naniwa gyoza (なにわ餃子) Naniwa is the old name for Osaka

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#32 SobaAddict70

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Posted 12 April 2005 - 01:51 PM

The ones at Minca seem pretty good. Light and almost greaseless, peppery/porky filling and a nice vinegar-soy sauce.

Another place to try is Zen Noodle Shop on St. Mark's Place between 2nd and 3rd Avenues. (These are NYC-based restaurants.)

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#33 Kiem Hwa

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Posted 25 April 2005 - 11:48 AM

Last night I made Gyoza, featuring shiso:

I made Gyoza stuffed with a ground pork-shrimp-cabbage-etc. mixture, and either added a shiso leave or put cheese.
Posted Image

Also, I made Shiso-kabocha-mochi gyoza, using grated kabocha, and pieces of chopped up of mochi blocks wrapped in a shiso leaf!
Posted Image
(You cant see the mochi piece in this picture, it buried in the kabocha)

Our stuffing came out good, especially the kabocha ones cause I could really taste the shiso flavor, and it had creamy mochi inside, but for some reason our wrappers ended up being kind of stiff and rubbery. We had bought the wrappers, and cooked the gyoza by frying it in a little bit of oil for awhile (~7min), and them adding water and steaming it with the lid on (~7min), but maybe we over cooked them? (we were paranoid about the ground pork getting cooked well). Any ideas?

#34 torakris

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Posted 06 May 2005 - 04:53 PM

I just picked up the new book by NHK's Tameshite Gatten and they say to get the best tasting gyoza you should boil them first and then fry them. This is the opposite of how most people do it.
They say to put the gyoza into a frypan and add very hot water to half of their height, turn on the heat and boil for three minutes, then carefully holding the lid down pour the water off. Then drizzle the pan with oil and cook until they have a nice crisp crust.


As to the gu or filling:
For meat gyoza, you should place the meat in a bowl and add a bit of salt and soy sauce and then knead it really well, only after you have kneaded it should you add the rest of the ingredients.

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#35 easternsun

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 07:03 AM

Well, I decided to do a pictorial of my veggie gyozas with TSP (textured soy protein).

The photos are a little scary and belong here but the final product is quite tasty and satisfies my gyoza cravings.

Scroll down at your own risk :laugh:

Posted Image

The measuring cup on the right contains TSP. I use a dried flake version that I order from Tengu Natural Foods. The brownish bits on the cutting board are maitake and shiitake mushrooms.

Posted Image

Now I put the TSP and chopped mushrooms in a bowl and chop cabbage.

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The cabbage was added to the bowl along with some chopped nira (garlic chives). Next step is to add some German Mozzarella. The bottles are organic soy sauce and organic goma (sesame) oil, some crap cooking sake because I was out of the good stuff and mirin. I add a bit of each.

You can quit now and you'll save yourself from....




Posted Image

Looks gross doesnt it? This is the filling all mixed up. It smells great btw.


Posted Image

We usually get our gyoza wrappers from a gyoza shop near our house but on this particular day, they were not selling any. So I used the supermarket variety. I think this was the shot that got the camera a bit mucky!

Posted Image

Into the pan my little pretties!

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Not much to see here - gyoza are on the fire and the rice is cooling. My DH likes his rice on the cool side.

Posted Image

We :unsure: ummmm....well, we ate the money shot!

The 100 yen shop was my best friend when I got married and had to buy absolutely everything. I cant stand this crockery now :rolleyes:

Posted Image

I made a few more so that we could eat/show them but by the time I did, I was pooped and made no effort to make it pretty.

TSP is really not as bad as it looks. When I dont feel like making two completely different meals for DH and myself it is a life saver.

Sorry for the food smut :wink:
"Thy food shall be thy medicine" -Hippocrates

#36 sanrensho

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 11:20 AM

Looks good to me! The gyoza skins look a lot thinner than the ones we used to buy in Japan (and the Chinese ones we buy here in Vancouver). Is that the norm in your part of Japan?

Do you always use a kama for your rice?
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#37 torakris

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 02:18 PM

Those skins look a lot thinner then the supermarket ones I buy, they are almost transparent.

If you hadn't told us what was in it we might never have known..... :biggrin:
I have never had either tp or cheese in gyoza, but I shouldn't knock it til I've tried it, right? It does look good though.

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#38 Hiroyuki

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 05:29 PM

Great photos! They are not gross at all.

I have one question: What is the dipping sauce?

I usually mix soy sauce and vinegar at a ratio of 1:1. I hate rayu (sp?) because it's too piquant for me, and never put it in my dipping sauce.

#39 easternsun

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 07:49 PM

Looks good to me! The gyoza skins look a lot thinner than the ones we used to buy in Japan (and the Chinese ones we buy here in Vancouver). Is that the norm in your part of Japan?

Do you always use a kama for your rice?

View Post


Hey Vancouver :wub:
(egullet makes me homesick!)

Yes, I always use a kama. People keep trying to give me an electric rice cooker, but I am happy with the way I do it. I wont go as far as to say the rice tastes better...ok I will :wink: !

They are thin skins arent they?? As we usually get them at the back door of the kitchen of a local gyoza shop, this was the first time in a very long time for me to purchase them from the supermarket. Kristin said they are thin too....maybe just that brand??
"Thy food shall be thy medicine" -Hippocrates

#40 easternsun

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 07:57 PM

Those skins look a lot thinner then the supermarket ones I buy, they are almost transparent.

If you hadn't told us what was in it we might never have known..... :biggrin:
I have never had either tp or cheese in gyoza, but I shouldn't knock it til I've tried it, right? It does look good though.

View Post



Kristin, you should try TSP! I know lots of people hate it and I am not really into fake meat things but sometimes I dont feel like making a meat dinner and a veg dinner and this way I save so much time (and money). I can make it taste fairly meaty and control the texture with the amount of liquid I add. I use it for a quick Ma Po Tofu/Nasu or anything else that requires mince. I am a daily shopper and if I work late and dont make it to the shops before they close....I know what dinner will be!

Cheese in gyoza was an idea I got from one of those television programs on "Japan's Best Gyoza". I love cheese and want to put it in everything anyway so it wasnt hard to convince me!
"Thy food shall be thy medicine" -Hippocrates

#41 mizducky

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 08:02 PM

I think your pictures (and food) look great too!

About the TSP: I had tried, and kind of given up on, TSP, mainly because I was not liking the texture/mouthfeel of the stuff I was working with. Nomatter how long I cooked it, the little bits would still come out like rubbery little pencil-erasers. But now I'm wondering if it was just the brand of TSP I was using. Could you tell me the brand you get from Tengu, so I can see if I can find it here in the US? Thanks!

#42 easternsun

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 08:03 PM

Great photos!  They are not gross at all.

I have one question:  What is the dipping sauce?

I usually mix soy sauce and vinegar at a ratio of 1:1.  I hate rayu (sp?) because it's too piquant for me, and never put it in my dipping sauce.

View Post



Hiroyuki,

We always have three options: Asahi Ponzu, salt and a shoyu (soy), goma abura (sesame oil), su (vinegar) and rayu (chili oil) sauce that I make myself.
"Thy food shall be thy medicine" -Hippocrates

#43 sanrensho

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 10:30 PM

They are thin skins arent they??  As we usually get them at the back door of the kitchen of a local gyoza shop, this was the first time in a very long time for me to purchase them from the supermarket.  Kristin said they are thin too....maybe just that brand??


Where in Japan are you? Maybe it's a local thing?
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#44 easternsun

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Posted 29 October 2005 - 06:20 PM

I think your pictures (and food) look great too!

About the TSP: I had tried, and kind of given up on, TSP, mainly because I was not liking the texture/mouthfeel of the stuff I was working with. Nomatter how long I cooked it, the little bits would still come out like rubbery little pencil-erasers. But now I'm wondering if it was just the brand of TSP I was using. Could you tell me the brand you get from Tengu, so I can see if I can find it here in the US? Thanks!

View Post


Sorry Tengu makes their own and I think it is available only in Japan. I can tell you that I have had the best results with the flakes not the chunks.

I do season the flakes but I dont pre-cook them. I add a little hot water and seasoning, fluff it with a fork and toss it in when a recipe calls for mince. I use Bragg to flavour it.

I hope that helps!
"Thy food shall be thy medicine" -Hippocrates

#45 easternsun

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Posted 29 October 2005 - 06:22 PM

They are thin skins arent they??  As we usually get them at the back door of the kitchen of a local gyoza shop, this was the first time in a very long time for me to purchase them from the supermarket.  Kristin said they are thin too....maybe just that brand??


Where in Japan are you? Maybe it's a local thing?

View Post


I am in Osaka. I will see if I can find out! Does Gyoza King still make those yummy prawn gyoza?
"Thy food shall be thy medicine" -Hippocrates

#46 sanrensho

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Posted 29 October 2005 - 08:42 PM

I am in Osaka.  I will see if I can find out! Does Gyoza King still make those yummy prawn gyoza?


Sorry, I have no idea. I've only been to Gyoza King once in the last 5-6 years. :sad:

That's what I get for living in the culinary backwaters of Deep Cove. :biggrin:
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#47 torakris

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Posted 29 August 2006 - 09:30 PM

I just ran across this.
Gyoza sweets
1. ichigo daifuku gyoza
2. apple pie gyoza
3. gyoza parfait

I am not quite sure what I think of this yet but I wouldn't mind trying the apple pie one!

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#48 Cheeko

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 06:51 PM

Gee --
I would have said shrimp and shiitake, but after reading these posts and seeing some of the gorgeous dishes I've seen would make me think I haven't even begun to live yet... The Shiso-kabocha-mochi gyoza! Sounds good to me, rubbery skins or not :rolleyes:

#49 _john

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Posted 01 September 2006 - 05:23 AM

I had a great goya rafuti gyoza at an okinawa restaurant. simply amazing. I've also had normal gyoza that contained strawberries mixed in, also extremely good. I will be going to a couple famous gyoza places in Osaka in the next few weeks and I will fill you in on the fillings.

#50 piazzola

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Posted 03 September 2006 - 04:40 PM

Funny these gyoza thingies, these gems assume different shapes and fillings across Asia yet the cooking method remains almost the same boil and shallow almost dry fry for the skin to crisp up.
Also known as pelmeni, vareniki, pierogi or pyrogy, koldunai, kreplah, manti but Siberian pelmeni and Kazakh manti share very similar fillings with gyoza.

#51 MoGa

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Posted 01 May 2008 - 04:46 AM

I hesitated about including this information in the 'everything ramen' thread (gyoza arguably comes under this category), but found this dedicated thread.

---

For those who are drawn to ramen places mainly for the gyoza, there is a place where a selection of gyoza restaurants are huddled together. I regard the environment in which they're situated 'challenging' - the sort of place that can only be enjoyed by the sort of connoisseurs of kitsch who openly enjoy the seedier-yet-still-family-friendly corners of places such as Niagara Falls, Las Vegas, Benidorm, Lourdes, Blackpool or Southend, at least on their first visit.

It's the misleadingly named Gyoza 'stadium' in Namja Town (entry fee required) in the Sunshine City Complex in Ikebukuro. (Same location as the Ikebukuro Sunshine Prince Hotel.)

There's a video tour somebody uploaded here:
http://au.youtube.co...h?v=0a0oAJnNTog

Familiarise yourself with the location of the nearest fire exits before you settle down to eat there.
Only reason I know about Namja Town is because we went specifically to buy dried miracle fruit there. Unfortunately, I needed to sit outside in a wheelchair (in front of the gyoza stadium adverts) whilst my non-kitsch appreciating husband went inside to get the berries. They were kind enough to give him a generous discount on the entrance price. I got a full and fresh second-hand commentary on the wonders inside Namja Town.

There's currently some kind of Gyoza Challenge event at Gyoza Stadium featuring highlights such as monster lobster gyoza and 1 metre long gyoza
More infor here: http://www.sunshinec...vent/e0114.html

#52 gfweb

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 09:19 PM

Thought I'd bump this old thread up.

 

I've been fooling around with potstickers lately.  Besides the usual porky/shrimpy fillings, I've made a pretty darn tasty Reuben filling (corned beef + kraut + Russian dressing)...a cheeseburger filling (cheddar, beef, ketchup) and a jalapeno/tuna salad filling  (tastes much better than it sounds), and a breakfast sausage and cheese potsticker.

 

Potstickers have turned into a way to dispose of a small quantity of meat in a tasty way.

 

Anybody have novel dumplings they'd like to share?



#53 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 12:11 PM

There are some unorthodox jiaozi here.


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#54 rotuts

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 12:23 PM

any sort of BBQ:  Ckicken / Ck. skin / dab of ' sauce '  same w pork ribs: bit of rib meat  bit of 'char' bit of sauce  

 

I used to make ravioli this way w left over BBQ.

 

but you've already got the idea:  anything really good 'before' , in small bits later is good in a dumpling skin or a ravioli skin.

 

PS:  some of the best ravioli Ive ever made ( and dumplings would work just as well ) were from left-over

 

'BBQ' oven made chicken wings from an Rx in the book "Frog Commissary" a PHIL PA restaurant back in the day:  you just stripped out the bones and put the remaining meat/sauce/skin in ravioli or dumpling skin.

 

http://www.amazon.co...s/dp/0940159732

 

my book unfortunately has traveled to an unknown spot.


Edited by rotuts, 28 February 2014 - 12:37 PM.

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#55 djyee100

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 12:36 PM

A friend once brought some "Tex-Mex" siu mai (shaomai) to a potluck party. It tasted surprisingly good. It was a ground beef filling mixed with a salsa (tomatoes, garlic, onion, cilantro, chiles, salt--anything else go into salsa?). He put some shredded mild cheddar into the filling also. I didn't care for the cheese part, at least in the steamed siu mai. I bet if this filling was fried in potstickers it would taste good, with or without cheese. I suggest draining the tomatoes well so the filling isn't too wet for frying. If using fresh tomatoes, cut them up, salt them, and let drain in a sieve set over a bowl for 10 mins or more.


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#56 gfweb

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 01:13 PM

any sort of BBQ:  Ckicken / Ck. skin / dab of ' sauce '  same w pork ribs: bit of rib meat  bit of 'char' bit of sauce  

 

I used to make ravioli this way w left over BBQ.

 

but you've already got the idea:  anything really good 'before' , in small bits later is good in a dumpling skin or a ravioli skin.

 

PS:  some of the best ravioli Ive ever made ( and dumplings would work just as well ) were from left-over

 

'BBQ' oven made chicken wings from an Rx in the book "Frog Commissary" a PHIL PA restaurant back in the day:  you just stripped out the bones and put the remaining meat/sauce/skin in ravioli or dumpling skin.

 

http://www.amazon.co...s/dp/0940159732

 

my book unfortunately has traveled to an unknown spot.

I remember Frog well. One of the few decent places back then.



#57 rotuts

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 01:35 PM

BTW  if you ever get on the 'steamed-bread' type dumplings, all these things work well, and are a bit of a surprise when tried.



#58 gfweb

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 05:01 PM

BTW  if you ever get on the 'steamed-bread' type dumplings, all these things work well, and are a bit of a surprise when tried.

Not familiar with these. Steamed bread?



#59 heidih

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 05:20 PM

BTW  if you ever get on the 'steamed-bread' type dumplings, all these things work well, and are a bit of a surprise when tried.

Not familiar with these. Steamed bread?


I think the reference is to bao https://www.google.c...iw=1093&bih=497
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#60 gfweb

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 06:43 PM

 

 

BTW  if you ever get on the 'steamed-bread' type dumplings, all these things work well, and are a bit of a surprise when tried.

Not familiar with these. Steamed bread?

 


I think the reference is to bao https://www.google.c...iw=1093&bih=497

 

Forgot all about bao...never thought of t hem as steamed bread, but of course they are







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