Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Infusions & Tinctures at Home: The Topic


  • Please log in to reply
431 replies to this topic

#91 MiguelCardoso

MiguelCardoso
  • participating member
  • 275 posts
  • Location:Lisbon, Portugal.

Posted 10 December 2003 - 07:09 PM

I think it's a wonderful idea, beans! It's too late this year but perhaps next year we can organize an I-Swap whereby members can ship out their better infusions to each other. I understand that there are a few restrictions in the U.S. to sending booze in the post but perhaps a small, cologne-size bottle would be OK?

Tomorrow morning I'll be getting the very last strawberries of the year; freshly plucked raspberries and some new Chilean cherries. The Portuguese Ministry of Agriculture issues a very complete weekly report of all the crops and imports, with very reliable details on condition, scarcity, price and sales - so it's a cinch to order correctly, as my local greengrocer goes every evening to the big professional MARL Lisbon market. Here's the URL just out of curiosity: http://www.min-agric..._03/MENU_03.HTM. You just choose the latest week from the drop-down menu. Fascinating stuff!

Do you have a similar service in the States and Canada?

All the very best, beans - thanks again for your kindness and enthusiasm! :)

#92 MiguelCardoso

MiguelCardoso
  • participating member
  • 275 posts
  • Location:Lisbon, Portugal.

Posted 10 December 2003 - 10:37 PM

Oops, I forgot to add the link to your highly enlightening and entertaining cocktail seminar which is a must for all infusionistas.

Since I'm here again, I'll add that I'm going to take the experimental road with those cherries I'll be receiving in a couple of hours. One, I'll do the Russian way, with crushed cherry pits (36, no less, say the very creditable Vodkaphiles!). The second, just with the pulp. And a third I'll make with a combination of cherry pulp and a few crushed pits. I know that sour cherries would have been better, but I can't get my hands on any right now. One of the most popular drinks in Portugal is "ginjinha" (a little like the Danish Cherry Heering), which are sour cherries steeped in "bagaço" (grappa).

I'll report back on the results.

I should add an update on my several dozen infusions: in no case have I seen any advantage in removing the fruit/seeds/pods/whatever. The flavour just keeps growing and, with the citrus fruits, the very delicate mustiness which results is a feature, rather than a bug.

Cheers!

#93 mjg

mjg
  • participating member
  • 75 posts

Posted 11 December 2003 - 08:54 AM

Miguel, you mention that you don't need to take the fruit out of the infusion. I've seen commerically infused alcohols with fruit still in the bottle but figured that it was treated with something to prevent it from going bad.

So I guess it is safe to assume that fruit can stay in the alcohol indefinately without any loss of quality or spoilage? If that is the case, I'll be leaving the cranberries I currently have in a jar of vodka rather than straining them out.

#94 DrinkBoy

DrinkBoy
  • participating member
  • 227 posts
  • Location:Seattle

Posted 12 December 2003 - 07:32 AM

I've seen commerically infused alcohols with fruit still in the bottle but figured that it was treated with something to prevent it from going bad.

The fruit in the bottle -was- treated with something to prevent it from going bad. Alcohol. :biggrin:

-Robert

#95 trillium

trillium
  • participating member
  • 1,515 posts

Posted 12 December 2003 - 12:15 PM

Since I'm here again, I'll add that I'm going to take the experimental road with those cherries I'll be receiving in a couple of hours. One, I'll do the Russian way, with crushed cherry pits (36, no less, say the very creditable Vodkaphiles!). The second, just with the pulp. And a third I'll make with a combination of cherry pulp and a few crushed pits. I know that sour cherries would have been better, but I can't get my hands on any right now. One of the most popular drinks in Portugal is "ginjinha" (a little like the Danish Cherry Heering), which are sour cherries steeped in "bagaço" (grappa).

Infusing booze with sour cherries is popular in the US too. It goes by the name "bounce" and is usually done with bourbon and some extra sugar. After years of experimentation, we like including the pits, but not crushing them, and leaving the cherries lightly smashed as opposed to pulverized.

regards,
trillium

#96 beans

beans
  • legacy participant
  • 2,836 posts

Posted 13 December 2003 - 12:43 AM

I think it's a wonderful idea, beans! It's too late this year but perhaps next year we can organize an I-Swap whereby members can ship out their better infusions to each other. I understand that there are a few restrictions in the U.S. to sending booze in the post but perhaps a small, cologne-size bottle would be OK?

On a quick note -- thank you again MiguelCardoso. Your kind words cause me to :blush:

I'm thrilled that an eGCI class inspired another. I'm elated that infusing has occurred. :wub:

Regarding the shipping of an alcoholic/spiritous beverage. Rats! I've exhausted most shipping venues regarding this matter so as I may simply send a lovely bottle of Woodford Reserve to one within the United Kingdom. ( He's my inspiration, so what's with a little ole bottle gift for the holidays?? Hmmm. Guess I'll have to hand carry on the next visit.....)

In short, it is not legally cohesive. There are highly regulated rules on legally licensed liquor business to buisness, depending upon state. :wacko:

[b]Durn!!!!![/]

#97 beans

beans
  • legacy participant
  • 2,836 posts

Posted 13 December 2003 - 12:45 AM

Come on eG! How about this thread being the Infusion "club"????

#98 mjg

mjg
  • participating member
  • 75 posts

Posted 15 December 2003 - 07:59 AM

Count me as a member of the infusion club!

Of late I've developed a bit of an unhealthy obsession with infusing vodka. This weekend I started three more and new ideas keep popping into my head.

I'm using small mason jars (12 ounces, I think) for the infusion and am hoping to find some decorative bottles for storage after the infusion is complete. Anyone have any ideas for a source for such bottles?

Right now I have the following in the works.

1. Cranberry--This has been in the jar for about two weeks and still needs quite a bit of time. I poked about a handful of cranberries pretty enthusiastically with a fork before pouring in the vodka, figuring this would speed the process along. The vodka is a beautiful red color but the flavor hasn't developed much yet.

2. Lemon Lime--Zest of two limes and two lemons. Started two days ago and it is already extremely fragrant.

3. Lemon--I'm making this for a friend whose love of lemons has given him the nickname..."Lemons." Zest of three lemons. Again, started two days ago and it is well on it's way.

4. Cranberry Lime--Based on one of my favorite mixed drinks (vodka and cranberry with a twist of lime), this one is also a gift. Figured the green and red would make a nice Christmas-colored gift. However, the red from the cranberries (small handful) has already dyed the zest (two limes) red. Smells great, though.

Plenty more to come I'm sure. Next on the docket...ginger and red chile?

--Edited because "infusioning" isn't a word.

Edited by mjg, 15 December 2003 - 08:00 AM.


#99 beans

beans
  • legacy participant
  • 2,836 posts

Posted 19 December 2003 - 03:32 AM

Count me as a member of the infusion club!

Let's keep this Infusion Club idea alive!


Of late I've developed a bit of an unhealthy obsession with infusing vodka. This weekend I started three more and new ideas keep popping into my head.

No such thing! :raz:

I'm using small mason jars (12 ounces, I think) for the infusion and am hoping to find some decorative bottles for storage after the infusion is complete. Anyone have any ideas for a source for such bottles?


I really like that you do small and a variety of batches. :cool: Sometimes I feel like a 750ml or a litre is the project when in fact I ought to shoot for a litre bottle that can be divided into subparts for the flavour of the moment. Thanks for that idea. :smile:

As far as bottles, I've hunted the web for craft store types as I was giving my home infusions away for holiday gifts. My local craft stores sort of came up short on this too, so the web was it.

Try the local store as well as a good Googling, but this is one that I previously bookmarked:
http://www.save-on-c...iumbottles.html

This was one source I didn't order from, but have a variety of shapes and sizes I found appealing in this endeavour.

[I did have two other web sources that I ordered from a little over a year ago, that seems to no longer be on the web.... :unsure: Tough business and/or economic atmosphere these days, eh?]

I've also purchased those 4 pack mini bottles of white or red wine which I've used for both cooking and collecting small bottles for the infusion giving/sharing purpose. With much soaking, (and don't forget to save the metal, flimsy bottle screw cap) the labels eventually peel off and with the assistance of a funnel I will pour a small gift portion and make some fun, custom labels (if my printer is in a good mood) and glue them to my sparkling gem like gifts. :smile:


Right now I have the following in the works.

1. Cranberry--This has been in the jar for about two weeks and still needs quite a bit of time. I poked about a handful of cranberries pretty enthusiastically with a fork before pouring in the vodka, figuring this would speed the process along. The vodka is a beautiful red color but the flavor hasn't developed much yet.

2. Lemon Lime--Zest of two limes and two lemons. Started two days ago and it is already extremely fragrant.

3. Lemon--I'm making this for a friend whose love of lemons has given him the nickname..."Lemons." Zest of three lemons. Again, started two days ago and it is well on it's way.

4. Cranberry Lime--Based on one of my favorite mixed drinks (vodka and cranberry with a twist of lime), this one is also a gift. Figured the green and red would make a nice Christmas-colored gift. However, the red from the cranberries (small handful) has already dyed the zest (two limes) red. Smells great, though.

Plenty more to come I'm sure. Next on the docket...ginger and red chile?

--Edited because "infusioning" isn't a word.


Those are all delicious. Even more so as you created them. Post back with some of the favourite ways you enjoy these. :cool:



Yup, I think I like this Infusion Club idea. And the diversity! Not limited by merely VODKA!! I'd love to learn more about those bourbon ideas (inspired by one slkinsey) or rum ideas via Varmint. :cool:

Think of the summer herbals!

Since I adore picking and creating preserves, jams and jellies -- this is after all yet another preservation of the enjoyment of ___________ [fill in blank with seasonal flavour of choice] for future use and fits right into the enthusiasm I maintain for this sort of kitchen fun. :wub:

The minimal effort and fantastic rewards....

WOW!

#100 mjg

mjg
  • participating member
  • 75 posts

Posted 19 December 2003 - 06:33 AM

I've also purchased those 4 pack mini bottles of white or red wine which I've used for both cooking and collecting small bottles for the infusion giving/sharing purpose.


That is an excellent idea. We gave away little bottles of wine as wedding favors when we got married in October and I think we still have quite a few leftover bottles sitting around. I'll have to empty them out (into my stomach, of course) and get 'em soaking.

#101 KatieLoeb

KatieLoeb
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 9,156 posts
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 19 December 2003 - 08:10 AM

Beans:

I have a bottle of Heaven Hill 7 yr. old bourbon at home that's had a big handful of "used" (scraped out) vanilla pods in it for about 4 months (for those of you that work in restaurants with a Pastry Department-it is an excellent source of these used pods that would normaly just be tossed out). The pods themselves still have quite a bit of flavoring left to give off and it makes a mighty tasty bourbon & coke or is nice for sipping on its own over ice :cool:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol


#102 Shannon Essa

Shannon Essa
  • participating member
  • 12 posts

Posted 28 December 2003 - 12:30 PM

Up in San Francisco at 2223 Market, they served a Bloody Mary with "Gazpacho" infused vodka. I couldn't get the exact ingredients out of the bartender, but I want to try this. Do you think some chopped tomatoes and green peppers would work? I won't be able to infuse very long - I want to serve this January 1.

Any ideas for "Gazpacho" vodka?

#103 KatieLoeb

KatieLoeb
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 9,156 posts
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 28 December 2003 - 02:42 PM

Up in San Francisco at 2223 Market, they served a Bloody Mary with "Gazpacho" infused vodka. I couldn't get the exact ingredients out of the bartender, but I want to try this. Do you think some chopped tomatoes and green peppers would work? I won't be able to infuse very long - I want to serve this January 1.

Any ideas for "Gazpacho" vodka?

Shannon:

I think that you definitely need to infuse cucumbers and onion into the vodka as well. Infusing the tomatoes seems to be overkill since I presume this will eventually be mixed with tomato juice, right? I might even use red bell peppers rather than green so as not to get too "vegetal" a taste in the finished product with the cucumbers as well. Also some herbs like parsley or cilantro might be nice but I'm not sure how long you'd have to let everything infuse, or if the herbs might have to go in later.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol


#104 WolfChef

WolfChef
  • participating member
  • 258 posts
  • Location:Excelsior

Posted 28 December 2003 - 02:50 PM

Katie your post reminded me that i used to love vanilla coke in my Johnny Walker Black label over ice. I'd get lots of strange looks from bartenders when i would order it. Sure a few eGulleters out there raised a eyebrow or two my way also.

#105 beans

beans
  • legacy participant
  • 2,836 posts

Posted 28 December 2003 - 04:04 PM

Welcome to eG AgaCooker! :cool:

Yum. Vanilla.

I thought it was on this thread, however I searched to find something Sam did that I felt was a wonderful drink -- this

Cheers!

[and again, thank you for sharing that cocktail Sam!] :wub:


edit: checked on link -- not going where I thought it would -- :blink: Let's try again!

Edited by beans, 28 December 2003 - 05:29 PM.


#106 KatieLoeb

KatieLoeb
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 9,156 posts
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 28 December 2003 - 04:10 PM

Katie your post reminded me that i used to love vanilla coke in my Johnny Walker Black label over ice. I'd get lots of strange looks from bartenders when i would order it. Sure a few eGulleters out there raised a eyebrow or two my way also.

Great minds think alike... :wink:

I confess I drink Diet Coke but the Diet Vanilla Coke just isn't that tasty. The vanilla tastes kind of "plastic" and fake. Diet Vanilla Pepsi is sonewhat better but I haven't had any in the house when I needed it to experiment with this cocktail. The vanilla infused bourbon is the perfect answer. And it's actually delicious over ice for sipping as well.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol


#107 beans

beans
  • legacy participant
  • 2,836 posts

Posted 28 December 2003 - 04:13 PM

edited to add: Welcome to eG Shannon! :cool:

[forgot my manners getting all excited about gazpacho bloodies and vanilla in whiskey.... :blink: ]

Up in San Francisco at 2223 Market, they served a Bloody Mary with "Gazpacho" infused vodka.  I couldn't get the exact ingredients out of the bartender, but I want to try this.  Do you think some chopped tomatoes and green peppers would work?  I won't be able to infuse very long - I want to serve this January 1.

Any ideas for "Gazpacho" vodka?

Shannon:

I think that you definitely need to infuse cucumbers and onion into the vodka as well. Infusing the tomatoes seems to be overkill since I presume this will eventually be mixed with tomato juice, right? I might even use red bell peppers rather than green so as not to get too "vegetal" a taste in the finished product with the cucumbers as well. Also some herbs like parsley or cilantro might be nice but I'm not sure how long you'd have to let everything infuse, or if the herbs might have to go in later.

Add to that -- hot peppers like a jalapeno, or perhaps using Absolut Peppar as the infusion vodka?

Nah. I'd throw in the jalapeno.

Yum.

Edited by beans, 28 December 2003 - 04:15 PM.


#108 KatieLoeb

KatieLoeb
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 9,156 posts
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 28 December 2003 - 04:59 PM

Add to that -- hot peppers like a jalapeno, or perhaps using Absolut Peppar as the infusion vodka?

Nah. I'd throw in the jalapeno.

Yum.

Yeah - What she said.

I'll see your Yum and raise you to Yummy! :laugh:

Welcome Shannon!

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol


#109 beans

beans
  • legacy participant
  • 2,836 posts

Posted 28 December 2003 - 05:01 PM

:laugh:

only *fun* can be had here!!!

#110 Shannon Essa

Shannon Essa
  • participating member
  • 12 posts

Posted 28 December 2003 - 07:22 PM

Thanks for the welcome, and the tips!

I'll use cucumbers, red peppers, red onion and jalapeno and throw some parsley in at the end. Will let you know how it turns out!

I am having a New Year's Day Party - the theme is hangover relief. So I'll serve Bloody Marys with the infused vodka, a pretty intense homemade eggnog, Bellini's, and Anchor Steam Christmas Ale. Anyone in the San Diego area is welcome! :wacko:

#111 mjg

mjg
  • participating member
  • 75 posts

Posted 29 December 2003 - 06:12 AM

I made Bloody Mary's on Christmas Day with my habanero-infused vodka. They were intense. The first one I made I didn't cut with any regular vodka and it was like drinking really tasty fire.

The turnaround time for your gazpacho vodka is pretty tight, but I'm sure that you'll pick up the stronger flavors from the onion and jalepeno at the very least.

#112 mjg

mjg
  • participating member
  • 75 posts

Posted 29 December 2003 - 08:48 AM

Over the weekend I strained out three of my infusions. Here is a picture:

Posted Image

From left to right, they are Lemon, Cranberry, and Lemon Lime. I added some crystallized ginger to the lemon after straining out the lemon zest. We'll see how that works out.

On sampling, each turned out great. The Cranberry went well with Sprite. I mixed up a couple drinks using the Lemon Lime as well. One measure Cranberry, one half measure Lemon Lime, one measure Apple Pucker and one measure simple syrup was tasty, though my wife preferred the same concoction minus the Apple Pucker. Tasted quite a bit like pink lemonade.

I found the six ounce bottles at a craft store. I was hoping to find something a little larger, as the mason jars I use for the infusion hold 12 oz., but in the end I consider the extra 4 to 6 ounces left over the "angel's share" and will use that for testing out recipes before giving away the smaller bottles.

#113 beans

beans
  • legacy participant
  • 2,836 posts

Posted 29 December 2003 - 12:18 PM

Thanks for sharing mjg. :cool:

Those look fantastic.

In fact those look so lovely, I think I'm going to start a few new batches for "winter warmer" projects. I always want to make a bunch for the holidays, however infusions always get the short end of the stick on my homemade projects/gifts list. :sad: I always want to start them in the fall (or will think of it again around Thanksgiving), forget and get busy, then want them in a pinch come December! (I confess that the raspberry infusion I gave away was made last year and was one of the 750ml bottles that was stashed, hidden and sort of forgotten. ooops.)



If anyone finds a blend they really enjoy and wish to seek out some custom labels for these signature creations -- I've seen some nice work by this website, however I haven't ordered from them, yet. Again, this is one of those holiday things I always plan to do, but....

Alternatively, my Canon bubblejet is at a minimum -- fair on a good day with color printing and if I can sneak in and print a page on our office monster, mega color printer, a wonderful, powerful Minolta, they turn out beautifully. (And, the Minolta's toner doesn't run on contact with anything liquid). Today's MS publishing templates are almost as much fun as creating the infusion!

Edited by beans, 29 December 2003 - 12:19 PM.


#114 cinnamonshops

cinnamonshops
  • participating member
  • 31 posts

Posted 02 January 2004 - 09:52 AM

hi everyone, i'm new here & i have kind of a specific question about the whole vodka infusing thing:

a few days ago i bought a buddha's hand citron with the intention of infusing it. so. it's a weird fruit & i don't know too much about it, but i take it that there isn't much by way of actual fruit/flesh inside. so my question is, does anyone have an opinion about the best way to go about infusing it? in other words, would it make any sense to just leave it whole? or would i be better off cutting it up and scraping out whatever little fruit (and pith) it might have?

any ideas?

thanks in advance!

molly

ps: here's a link to a little information about the citron, and a picture:
http://www.daleysfru...ages/citron.htm

#115 JAZ

JAZ
  • manager
  • 4,901 posts
  • Location:Atlanta

Posted 02 January 2004 - 10:00 AM

hi everyone, i'm new here & i have kind of a specific question about the whole vodka infusing thing:

a few days ago i bought a buddha's hand citron with the intention of infusing it. so. it's a weird fruit & i don't know too much about it, but i take it that there isn't much by way of actual fruit/flesh inside. so my question is, does anyone have an opinion about the best way to go about infusing it? in other words, would it make any sense to just leave it whole? or would i be better off cutting it up and scraping out whatever little fruit (and pith) it might have?

Welcome, cinnamonshops!

Whenever I've done any infusions with citrus fruit, I've only used the outside layer of the peel, not the fruit itself. I peel it off in strips, leaving the pith behind. So that's what I'd recommend for the buddha's hand as well.

#116 beans

beans
  • legacy participant
  • 2,836 posts

Posted 02 January 2004 - 11:42 AM

:cool: Welcome to eG Molly!

a few days ago i bought a buddha's hand citron with the intention of infusing it. so. it's a weird fruit & i don't know too much about it, but i take it that there isn't much by way of actual fruit/flesh inside. so my question is, does anyone have an opinion about the best way to go about infusing it? in other words, would it make any sense to just leave it whole? or would i be better off cutting it up and scraping out whatever little fruit (and pith) it might have?

any ideas?

Do you have a zester/channel knife? Pictured below is from the eGCI class Evolving Cocktails, Part I, that I've found to be the best tool for the job. :smile:

Posted Image

Posted Image

Sure, you could use one of those zesters with the tiny holes or a micro-planer, but then the zest will be a real bugger racking (filtering) out of the infusion, after the desired amount of time steeping all of that lovely goodness. However if you have the patience -- more surface contact of the fruit, in this case the zest, in the alcohol does provides optimal flavouring -- go for it! :raz:

The above pictured zester/channel knife provides the best and most attractive strips also leaving out the bitter pith. Plus you may find yourself curiously seeing exactly how long you can keep zesting one continuous strip (or maybe that's just me :biggrin: )! Also, removing the zest strips will be much easier and less of the alcohol will be sacraficed during the filtering process as you can simply use a pair of tongs to fish them out.

A restaurant/bar supply will have a "lemon zester" (look for one with the channel knife indent) at a most economical price, usually under US$5, making it a worthy investment to seek out. Restaurant/bar supply stores do sell to the public and welcome the business, so there is no secret handshake or piece of paper that keeps you from visiting them for some economical and practical home bar supply purchases.

The point being, have fun with it. The more fun you have making it the more fun you'll have enjoying your own creation. :smile:

I hope some of this helps.
Cheers!

#117 beans

beans
  • legacy participant
  • 2,836 posts

Posted 02 January 2004 - 11:45 AM

Oh! I almost forgot! Molly -- juice the remainder of that buddha's hand citron for use in a lovely cocktail and don't waste it after skinning the little thing! :biggrin:

Edited by beans, 02 January 2004 - 11:46 AM.


#118 DrinkBoy

DrinkBoy
  • participating member
  • 227 posts
  • Location:Seattle

Posted 02 January 2004 - 11:54 AM

When you are wanting to use citrus peels for "infusing", you probably -don't- want to use a channel knife.

The problem is that it is the oils in the skin of the citrus that are adding the flavors to the infusion, and the "stress" of using a channel knife will actually pre-release many of these oils. Carefully watch the next time you spin a zest using a channel knife, and you'll see a spray of oils fly into the air.

This is also why when you use a channel knife to cut a zest for a garnish that you should cut this "over" the glass that the garnish will be used for. This will allow these essential oils to be deposited into the drink where they can add a nice touch of flavoring.

For infusions, you can just slice the citrus into thin slices and put them into the vodka whole, although this will result in a slightly cloudy result. If you want to use just the peel, then my recommendation is to use a pareing knife and gently cut off the peel of the citrus, trying to avoid as much of the white pith as possible (but you can't avoid all of it).

-Robert
www.DrinkBoy.com

#119 beans

beans
  • legacy participant
  • 2,836 posts

Posted 02 January 2004 - 12:05 PM

When you are wanting to use citrus peels for "infusing", you probably -don't- want to use a channel knife.

The problem is that it is the oils in the skin of the citrus that are adding the flavors to the infusion, and the "stress" of using a channel knife will actually pre-release many of these oils. Carefully watch the next time you spin a zest using a channel knife, and you'll see a spray of oils fly into the air.

This is also why when you use a channel knife to cut a zest for a garnish that you should cut this "over" the glass that the garnish will be used for. This will allow these essential oils to be deposited into the drink where they can add a nice touch of flavoring.

For infusions, you can just slice the citrus into thin slices and put them into the vodka whole, although this will result in a slightly cloudy result. If you want to use just the peel, then my recommendation is to use a pareing knife and gently cut off the peel of the citrus, trying to avoid as much of the white pith as possible (but you can't avoid all of it).

-Robert
www.DrinkBoy.com

Robert,

So would the channel knife over the desired infused liquor, catching all of the citrus essential oils, be best? I find that paring knives make removing zest from pith to be a real pain, stressing me out! :biggrin:

Edited by beans, 02 January 2004 - 12:07 PM.


#120 flacoman

flacoman
  • participating member
  • 112 posts

Posted 03 January 2004 - 05:49 PM

How would dried cherrires work as an infusing element?
I got a big bag of 'em and am getting tired of eating them out of hand

TIA
Flacoman