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Infusions & Tinctures at Home: The Topic


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#451 Hassouni

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Posted 26 September 2014 - 03:56 PM

Giving the Pur another attempt:

 

iSi infusion of dried fruit in brandy...somewhat cloudy. Thru the grain bag it went, then into the Pur, filtered in no time at all. Not crystal clear but not mucky at all. Looks decent in a stirred cocktail.

 

It does however lighten the color noticeably (not surprising), and also would appear to suck some flavor out.

 

 

Hmmmm


Edited by Hassouni, 26 September 2014 - 03:58 PM.


#452 pto

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 05:37 AM

Decided to make my first infusion, standard 80 proof vodka infused with walnuts. I'm following a recipe that's actually for walnut liqueur, but then I got to thinking: Why put the sugar in it? Why not just leave it as walnut infused vodka and add simple syrup to cocktails that I make with it as I see fit? Even if I wanted to drink it as a liqueur, I could add the desired amount of SS at the time of drinking. Does that make sense or is there a reason why it would better to add the sugar to the whole batch?

 

Also, how long would you infuse with the walnuts? (I used around 1 and 3/4 cup walnuts for 750ml vodka).



#453 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 08:40 AM

 

Also, how long would you infuse with the walnuts? (I used around 1 and 3/4 cup walnuts for 750ml vodka).

I did a walnut infusion in rum and let the walnuts infuse for 5 days. If you wait too long, it becomes unpleasantly tannic.



#454 Hassouni

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 05:54 PM

More updates - the Pur rocks for clarifying vermouth, but I think the fruit infused brandy clogged it the hell up - I had to change filters. For doing very murky stuff, I think each filter has a functional lifespan of maybe a gallon or two.



#455 Rafa

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 10:47 AM

In the new issue of Imbibe Dave Arnold recommends Pectinex Ultra SP-L for clarifying fruit infusions. You can buy it here.


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#456 haresfur

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 02:58 PM

In the new issue of Imbibe Dave Arnold recommends Pectinex Ultra SP-L for clarifying fruit infusions. You can buy it here.

 

Interesting.  I wonder if it would work to promote dissolving marmalade into drinks. Save a lot of shaking but maybe lose some mouth-feel? 


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#457 bostonapothecary

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 11:56 AM

Interesting.  I wonder if it would work to promote dissolving marmalade into drinks. Save a lot of shaking but maybe lose some mouth-feel? 

 

I'm pretty sure that one of the products of these enzymes breaking down pectin is methanol and this is one reason they are not used in wines make for distillation. in the context of a fruit juice or even a table wine it is absolutely not a big deal, but in an nth degree scenario like a marmalade, it might not be something you want.

 

I recently visited Greenhook Ginsmiths where they make a really cool beach plumb liqueur. beach plumbs have an extremely high pectin content but they don't use a pectic enzyme on it, they use other fining agents which are enough to precipitate enough of the pectin which floats to the top as a scum. it is then scooped out leaving far less to clog the filters.

 

if you are working with a fruit where pectin is a big concern but you want to be less invasive, you can perform your infusion at a very high proof which is often enough to precipitate much of the pectin. after that you can cut it down to your desired %. you might also just be over infusing by using too much contact time.

 

I think bar fabrication is going to go through a phase where people use all sorts of invasive techniques then eventually retreat back to less invasive techniques once everyone gets a better handle on all their options. I filter far less than other people. some of the recipes I tried from the Booker & Dax catalog seemed pretty much stripped of flavor to me.


Edited by bostonapothecary, 29 October 2014 - 12:02 PM.

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